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Christian the lion – Full ending

Video:  Christian the lion – Full ending

In 1969 a young Australian, John Rendall and his friend Ace Bourke, bought a small lion cub from Harrods pet department, which was then legal. ‘Christian’ was kept in the basement of a furniture shop on the Kings Road in Chelsea, the heart of the swinging sixties. Loved by all, the affectionate cub ate in a local restaurant, played in a nearby graveyard, but was growing fast…

A chance encounter with Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna led to a new life for Christian. He came to live in a huge enclosure and to sleep in a caravan at their Surrey home. Then in 1971 he was flown to Kenya, his ancestral home, and returned to the wild by lion-man George Adamson. Nine months later in 1972, John and Ace returned to Kora in Kenya. This clip is of their reunion at that time.

It was an emotional reunion: "He ran towards us, threw himself onto us, knocked us over and hugged us, with his paws on our shoulders."

John Rendall

Christian’s story. Directed by Bill Travers, commentary by Virgina McKenna, founders of the Born Free Foundation.

See http://www.bornfree.org.uk for more about this story.

Christian the Lion is distributed by Beckmann Visual Publishing

Movie:  Born Free

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Motherly Devotion

November 2, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Just One More Pet, Wild Animals | , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Animal welfare film honored with Emmys – Temple Grandin Wins 7 Emmy Awards!

Temple Grandin Wins 7 Emmy Awards!

We couldn’t be happier about Temple Grandin’s success at last night’s Emmy Awards Ceremony! The film was nominated for a whopping 15 Emmys, and walked away with seven — including the coveted Emmys for Outstanding Made for Television Movie and Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie.

HBO’s outstanding biopic movie Temple Grandin is near and dear to our hearts at American Humane Association as the inspirational story of one of the world’s true animal welfare champions. We are honored that part of Temple Grandin’s life’s work includes serving on the Scientific Advisory Committee of American Humane Association’s farm animal welfare program, the force behind the ultra-successful American Humane® Certified label for humane farming practices.

It’s also a movie that met our high standards for the treatment of animals on set. HBO looked to American Humane Association’s Film & Television Unit to oversee the “animal action” during the filming of Temple Grandin. We were pleased to reward the production with our famous “No Animals Were Harmed”® end-credit disclaimer and our Monitored: Outstanding rating.

Our congratulations go out to HBO, Claire Danes — who portrayed Temple Grandin in the film and won the Lead Actress Emmy — and everyone else affiliated with this magnificent film.
Learn more about Temple Grandin, the American Humane Association’s Certified farm animal welfare program and our Film and Television Unit.

Temple Grandin

“Temple Grandin’s remarkable talents and dedication have contributed immeasurably to the welfare of farm animals, and we deeply value her active involvement with American Humane Association’s farm animal welfare program. It was a thrill to see her receive the recognition she so richly deserves during last night’s broadcast, and our heartfelt congratulations go out to her and everyone who made this important film possible.”  –Dale Austin, CEO of American Humane Association’s farm animal welfare program

TIME MAGAZINE NAMES SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBER TEMPLE GRANDIN A HERO

Honored as One of ‘The 2010 Time 100 People Who Most Affect Our World’

Temple Grandin, a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the American Humane® Certified farm animal welfare program, was named by Time magazine as one of the 100 people “who most affect our world.” She was honored in the Heroes category for being an inspiration to people with autism, as well as her groundbreaking work designing livestock-handling systems that reduce stress on animals. Grandin has received numerous awards and recognition for her work in animal science and humane treatment of animals.

As a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for American Humane Certified, Grandin consults with program management to improve the program’s standards and methodologies and makes recommendations on animal welfare policy. American Humane Certified is the nation’s pre-eminent and fastest-growing monitoring, auditing and labeling program that attests to the humane care and handling of animals raised for food.

Grandin is also the best-selling author of Thinking in Pictures,Animals in Translation and Humane Livestock Handling. She recently authored an article titled “The Importance of Farm Animal Welfare” forThe National Humane Review.

MOVIE TELLS INSPIRATIONAL LIFE STORY OF AMERICAN HUMANE ADVISOR

‘Temple Grandin’ Premiered Feb. 6 on HBO

HBO premiered an original film based on the inspirational, true story of Temple Grandin, starring Claire Danes, on Feb. 6, 2010. The film was critically acclaimed, and received seven Emmy awards, including Outstanding Made For Television Movie and Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie.

Temple Grandin paints a picture of a young woman’s perseverance and determination while struggling with the isolating challenges of autism. Grandin became a successful doctor in animal science through her unique connection to animals and is now a world-renowned consultant in the field. She is widely recognized within the animal welfare and livestock-handling industries as a pioneer in the ethical treatment of animals.

In producing the film, HBO also engaged the services of American Humane’s Film & Television Unit, which is the exclusive monitoring and granting agency to award the coveted “No Animals Were Harmed”® end-credit disclaimer. The production followed American Humane’s strict Guidelines for the Safe Use of Animals in Filmed Media, had an American Humane Certified Animal Safety Representative™ on set to ensure animal safety and welfare, and earned the famous assurance to viewers that “no animals were harmed” in the making of the movie. Learn more about American Humane’s Film & Television Unit.

See film clip about this HBO original film here.

American Humane - ABRIOnline.org

Please Join and Support American Humane

August 31, 2010 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet | , , | Leave a comment

Movie inspires Petfinder’s Foster a Lonely Pet for the Holidays Program


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Hallmark’s CBS special, A Dog Named Christmas DVD (Hallmark Hall of Fame) inspires holiday pet fostering

‘Tis the season … of Christmas re-runs. But there’s a new movie I bet will be on your seasonal favorite list from now on — and a brand new Petfinder program to go with it.

The show is Hallmark Hall of Fame’s presentation of A Dog Named Christmas DVD (Hallmark Hall of Fame).

Based on a great little book by author and Petfinder blogger, Greg Kincaid, the story follows a developmentally challenged young man who fosters a dog from his local shelter during the holidays and he gets the whole community involved. It’s a feel-good story with a great message.

The idea inspired Petfinder to start the Foster a Lonely Pet for the Holidays program, and we hope you will invite a shelter pet into your home for this special time of year.

By contacting a participating Foster a Lonely Pet for the Holidays shelter or rescue, you’ll be helping a shelter during a season when it’s short-staffed or when the pet’s regular foster “mom” or “dad” needs some respite time. Plus, you’ll be making a difference in some little (or big) critter’s life. You can hardly top that for imbuing yourself with Christmas spirit!

Fostering doesn’t have to be a long-term commitment — just a few days or a week. And if you’re thinking of adopting, this will be a great way to see how adoption might work out.

If you missed the movie on Sunday, November 29, on CBS, go to Hallmark.com and then find a participating shelter in your area and give them a call.

See if you can help. It will be a case of life mimicking art where everyone has a very happy holiday season.

You Might Also Like:

Before You Foster
Blog: 8 reasons you CAN foster a cat — even if you think you can’t
Video: Volunteering with Shelter Cats
Video: Volunteering with Shelter Dogs

Posted:  Just One More Pet

SEASON’S GREETINGS
Did you see “A Dog Named Christmas” on TV? We have our own share of pets named Christmas. Like the TV dog, they all need forever homes. How about yours?

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December 15, 2009 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Rescues, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Disneynature’s Earth Opened for Earth Day – Buy a Ticket and Plant a Tree

Disneynature’s Earth opened for Earth Day
The Story of  Polar Bears, Humpbacked Whales, and Elephants


 

April 23, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Polar Bears, Humpbacked Whales, and Elephants – Experience the Planet Like Never Before

 

Director Mark Linfield and Friend

Ever wonder about the world’s largest land predator, how soon newborn whale calves are able to swim, or the little-known function of an elephant’s ears? While the answers might surprise and amuse you, it’s the adventure these questions pose that promises to be unforgettable. On April 22, you’re invited to experience an epic journey when Disneynature premieres “Earth,” the Company’s first wildlife film in over 60 years, continuing a legacy that began with Walt Disney’s Academy Award®-winning “True-Life Adventures.” Narrated by screen, stage, and television legend James Earl Jones, “Earth” reveals the seasonal struggles facing three animal families from the Arctic to Antarctica … and some of the planet’s most remote regions in between. 

Acclaimed wildlife filmmaker/director Mark Linfield tells why he and director/partner Alistair Fothergill chose polar bears, humpbacked whales, and elephants as their endearing main stars. “One thing that unites every being on the planet is the sun and its annual north-south journey. We wanted to document three animals that embark on incredible migrations due to the influence of the sun’s extreme seasonality … and these are large, engaging animals that we felt people could relate to. As the moviemaking went on, it became clear to us that we wanted a very subtle reference toward the future and conservation, which is why they had calves or cubs. Many of us have little ones and we’re always thinking of what the world will be like for them and their children. Most of the animals’ dramas are driven by their quest to protect their infants and get the best out of the planet for their offspring … nature truly writes the most amazing scripts.” 

To record “true” true-life adventures, there’s one thing Mark and his team couldn’t change, accelerate, or follow with a script — the erratic schedule of nature itself. He points out, “You’re lucky if the animals show up at all. Most days we didn’t see anything, that’s almost the law … the only way to stack the odds in your favor is to spend huge amounts of time in the field. We spent 2,000 days filming with 40 different crews in 26 different countries. It took about five years to make and we filmed solidly for three of those years … it was just a big logistical exercise, but that’s what it takes. Movies like this are powerful partly because it’s the simple truth.” Mark also explains that natural history actually translates better on the big screen because some of the up-close realism is lost when viewed on television. 

Larger than life, the animals’ determined battle against the elements is amazing, entertaining, and ultimately heartrending. Extreme weather conditions from pole to pole presented unique, and nearly impossible, filming challenges. “Just look at the environments that our three characters live in … like the polar bear. We’re actually in the middle of the  with crews working in 40-degree-below-zero temperatures. It’s so unbelievably cold that most of the time the equipment barely works or the tripod sticks to your fingers. Daylight was like five or six minutes long, which means it was dark the rest of the time. Polar bears are hugely influenced by the seasonality of the sun — half their year is spent in absolute darkness while the other half produces 24-hour daylight,” says Mark. The team was the first ever to be given access to the Kong Karls Land polar bear denning site in Norway, 700 miles south of the North Pole. 

Conditions proved no easier when the crew was filming the elephants in Botswana, the Sahara and Kalahari Deserts, and Namibia’s sand dunes, some of the largest in the world. “We worked in unbelievable heat, dust, and sandstorms … without water. The elephants aren’t affected from changes in daylight, but the sun drives the wet and dry seasons, forcing them to undertake huge migrations — their quest to finally find water hundreds of miles away at the Okavango Delta is pretty dramatic.” From helicopters, gyro-stabilized Cineflex aerial cameras allowed filmmakers to track the animals without disturbing them in their natural environment. 

“For the humpbacked whales, we filmed from a boat at sea, sometimes in a helicopter, through storms and a huge range of conditions,” he continues. “The mother whale and her calf travel 4,000 miles south, from the Equator’s tropical waters to the Antarctic Sea … it’s the longest journey of any marine mammal.” During the course of filming, the crew was able to feature dozens of marine costars, including schools of sailfish and a great white shark … the footage is nothing short of spectacular. 

The journey, as always, proved fantastic for Mark, who doesn’t hesitate when asked about his most memorable moment. “Filming the elephants caught in the sandstorm … it was totally unexpected. Just watching them trapped in a sandstorm, trying to battle the elements while looking after their calves, was very sad and emotional for me.” 

He then comments on his expectations for the film. “I hope people will fall in love with the Earth and basically see how much there still is to care about. Everything in the movie is available and can be saved. I hope people realize it’s not futile, it’s not too late … we have an absolutely amazing planet.” 

“Earth” promises to give audiences 85 amazing minutes that wouldn’t be humanly possible in an entire lifetime … or 10 lifetimes.

Source:  Disney Insider

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April 22, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments