JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

How Many Pets is Too Many??

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Puppy Love

How many pets are too many pets???  How many kids are too many kids???  It is a very individual choice and number.

Animal Planet has announced a new series about people who own a lot of animals.  They are looking for pet families with 15 or more.

Some brand them as “animal hoarders.”, and some are, but some people have enough love in their heart and the where-with-all to properly take care of and lover a large group of pets or animals.

Where is that line between realizing that you have too many pets and not being able to take care of them and just being a huge animal person or family that can.

Trying to care for too many animals can sometimes be overwhelming. There can be financial burdens, health issues, family conflicts, even the run-ins with authorities. The new show wants to see how animal lovers – and their families – deal with these challenges and offer them some help.

In a time where there are so many families experiencing financial problems and so many pets and animals needing good homes and care… permanent, temporary or foster, the goal of all animal people should be to find solutions, give people willing to adopt and care for just one more pet help and put a stop to unreasonable pet restriction rules and laws and move to a no kill philosophy by working together.

To learn more, contact us at email: realstories@petfamily.org – or call them at our toll free number: 1-877-MY8-PETS.

Ask Marion – Just One More Pet

April 8, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Rescues, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

ASPCA Rescues 25 Dogs from Queens Hoarder

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On August 19, the ASPCA, NYC Animal Care & Control and the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals worked in tandem with local police to rescue 25 dogs from an animal hoarder in Queens, NY. After a carefully planned intervention led by the ASPCA, the hoarder, a man in his mid-50s, voluntarily relinquished the dogs.

While neighbors had long been complaining to each other about the excessive barking and horrible smells coming from the house, it took several years for anyone to contact authorities. Officials were finally tipped off after a neighbor complained to various city agencies about the constant barking, vile stench and the ever-increasing number of animals in the residence.

The dogs—mostly Beagles, Miniature Pinschers and mixes of the two—were living in squalid conditions and suffering from an array of medical conditions including parasites, fleas, overgrown nails and mange. Four of the dogs are pregnant.

Hoarded Dogs

“Hoarding situations are complex and depending upon a number of factors, including the mental health status of the hoarder, they may or may not be referred to the criminal justice system,” says Allison Cardona, ASPCA Director of Disaster Response. “It is vital that authorities be notified of hoarding situations so that steps can be taken to ensure the protection of the animals. This kind of problem will not go away by itself. It will only get worse. That is why people need to speak up!”

The ASPCA also worked closely with Adult Protective Services because, as in many of these cases, the hoarder himself was in need of medical attention. “Like many psychological conditions, there are probably multiple underlying causes for animal-hoarding behavior. These are not situations that can or should be handled by animal welfare agencies alone,” explains Cardona. “The ASPCA will continue to work with Adult Protective Services to monitor this man’s behavior. Without intervention and monitoring, the relapse rate for hoarders is 100 percent.”

The surrendered dogs are recuperating in several shelters, and ASPCA animal behaviorists are currently working with seven in particular. “These dogs have never been socialized, walked on a leash or run around in a yard,” says Cardona. “Their future pet parents will need to be especially caring, patient people, willing go the extra mile.”

Make a Donation

For more information on animal hoarding, visit ASPCA.org.

Do you Twitter? Use this hashtag to tweet on this article: @aspca and #HoardedDogsRescued

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Be vigilant!!  The best way to stop this type of abuse and get the animals and hoarders help is to pay attention and report your concerns!!

September 12, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet and Animal Training, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment