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Update on TV Anchor Bitten by Rescued Dog During Live Broadcast and Max the Dog Who Bit Her

    KUSA Reports: Max, the Dog Who Bit Anchor Kyle Dyer ‘Most Likely’ Will Not Be Put Down I say thank goodness and animals lovers, lets make sure he is not but down.  This poor dog was first traumatized falling into the icy water, went through a rescue and then was paraded around on TV on a set that probably made him nervous. 

    I feel great sympathy for Kyle Dyer, who has gone through reconstructive surgery, and my prayers are with her for a full recovery, but common sense dictates that you don’t put your face against the face of a dog you hardly know, especially one that has been traumatized.

    KUSA sent reporter Chris Vanderveen to the Denver Animal Shelter on Thursday to check up on Max, short for "Gladiator Maximus", the 85-pound Argentine Mastiff that bit anchor Kyle Dyer. The dog is currently under quarantine following the on-air bite.

    In a story that lead KUSA’s evening newscasts on Thursday, the shelter’s director told Vanderveen that Max will “most likely” not be put down.

    “One of the things that Max has going for him is that it appears that this is his first bite,” the shelter’s director, Doug Kelley, said.

    Recounting the incident in his story, Vanderveen emphasized the potentially stressful circumstances surrounding the bite (it was less than 24 hours after Max was rescued from icy waters and occurred under bright studio lights) as well as the fact that Dyer got “close, really close” to the dog.

    Max is currently under a 10-day quarantine. His fate will be decided at the end of the quarantine period.

    Max’s owner released the following statement on Thursday:

    The past two days have been incredibly difficult for our family. We are truly saddened that Kyle Dyer of 9NEWs was injured during a celebratory interview following Max’s rescue. Our family and friends pray for a quick recovery and look forward to seeing Ms. Dyer back on-air soon.

    The only reason we agreed to do the interview following Max’s rescue was to show how truly grateful we are for the life-saving rescue of Max by Tyler Sugaski and the crew from Lakewood Fire Department Station No. 12.

    There’s been a tremendous amount of interest in Max’s story. However, there has been some misinformation reported by some news media and on the Internet about Max.

    For the record, Max is current in his vaccinations. Max has no history of aggression. Max is a gentle, loving, family dog. Max is well mannered and obedient and he hardly barks. This incident truly is unfortunate and does not reflect Max’s disposition towards people.

    (Full statement here).

    Denver TV Anchor Kyle Dyer Bitten by Rescued Dog During Live Broadcast

    Denver TV news anchor Kyle Dyer was bitten by a dog during a live broadcast Wednesday morning. (Image source: YouTube)

    Editor’s note: the video below has been updated.

    A Denver television news anchor was injured Wednesday after she was bitten in the face by a dog during a live broadcast.

    Kyle Dyer of Denver’s 9NEWS was conducting an interview about the rescue of Max, an 85-pound mastiff that fell through an icy lake Tuesday while chasing a coyote, the Denver Post reported. Firefighter Tyler Sugaski, secured by a life line, put on a wetsuit and ventured onto the ice to pull the dog to safety in the dramatic rescue.

    Denver TV Anchor Kyle Dyer Bitten by Rescued Dog During Live Broadcast

    Kyle Dyer (Image source: Denver Post)

    The dog, its owner and Sugaski were all in the studio for a follow-up interview Wednesday morning when the dog lunged and bit Dyer during the live segment. In a video of the incident, Dyer gasps and quickly turns away from the dog, saying “Oh my God!” as the broadcast cuts away to Dyer’s co-anchor, who looks shocked.

    “There was an incident during 9NEWS today. Kyle Dyer was bit in the face by a dog. She is getting medical attention due to the injury. As soon as we know the extent of Kyle’s injury, we will update you on her condition. Thanks everyone for the concerns/well-wishes,” a message posted on the station’s Facebook page said.

    Co-anchor Gary Shapiro wrote on his own Facebook page that the dog is “being detained by animal control while they investigate the incident,” according to the Post.

    “So you may have seen Kyle get bit by the dog in the 7 a.m. hour. All we know for sure is that he got her on the lip, and she’s being treated for the injury at the hospital,” Shapiro wrote. “We think she’s going to be OK, she was talking when she left.”

    In another Facebook post, Brooke Thacker, a morning reporter for the station, wrote: “We fortunately had a firefighter who was already here and he’s taking care of her.”

    Video: Dog bites television anchor

    Update: Dyer is awake and visiting with family in the hospital, a news release from the Denver Health Medical Center said.

    Here’s the video of the dog getting rescued from the lake:

    Raw Video:  Dog Rescued From Icy Colorado Water

    Whether it is a teacup Chihuahua a Pit Bull or a Mastiff… or any animal for that matter, they get nervous under stressful situations and Max had been in 2-days of non-stop stress and trauma.  Why would we even consider putting this good dog down because we, the humans, made bad decisions.  Please call, email and write in on Max’s behalf!

    February 13, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

    More winter? The groundhog says…

    Gene J. Puskar / AP

    Groundhog Club handler John Griffiths holds Punxsutawney Phil. This was the 126th celebration of Groundhog Day in Punxsutawney, Pa.

    Yes!

    Gene J. Puskar / AP

    A huge crowd gathered at Gobbler’s Knob, the tiny hill from which Phil makes his prediction on Feb. 2.

    The Punxsutawney Groundhog Club made their decree Thursday morning in central Pennsylvania: Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow, and there’ll be six more weeks of winter. The announcement was met with boos from the enormous crowd gathered in Punxsutawney.

    Folks in the East and elsewhere gave a collective shrug, as temperatures have been unseasonably warm. "But it’s the winter we’ve been having, so that’s like spring anyway," said Matt Lauer on TODAY after the news broke.

    "The daffodils are already in bloom in NW Mississippi," wrote Jackie Barnes Garrett on TODAY’s Facebook page, where hundreds of people are weighing in. "We are already fighting mosquitoes and flies."

    "Yesterday it was almost 60 degrees in Iowa," wrote Facebook commenter Letha Ann Alexander. But Sara LaPoint, from Colorado, has seen enough of this season. "I am SO done with snow and winter!" she wrote.

    The Associated Press reported that the groundhog has seen his shadow 99 times since 1886; he’s not seen it only 16 times, according to the Groundhog Club’s Inner Circle (there are no records for the remaining years, according to the AP). Though Phil gets all the credit, it’s 15 members of the Inner Circle who decide the news in advance.

    And not everyone believes the hype. "Punxsutawney Phil is a punk when it comes to weather forecasting," wrote veteran meteorologist Tim McGill on the Chicago Weather Center blog. McGill, who has covered 26 years of Phil predictions, said most weather experts "dread Groundhog Day." (For good measure, he ended his post with a recipe for woodchuck stew).

    But Mike Johnston, vice president of the Inner Circle, told the AP that Phil has "never been wrong." The reason is simple, he said: Phil can’t err, because he never applies his prognostication to a specific place. "I guarantee you someone’s going to have six more weeks of winter," he said.

    Ground Hog Day

    Short history of Ground Hog Day… not quite like the movie (Groundhog Day):

    In 1723, the Delaware Indians settled Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania as a campsite halfway between the Allegheny and the Susquehanna Rivers. The town is 90 miles northeast of Pittsburgh, at the intersection of Route 36 and Route 119. The Delawares considered groundhogs honorable ancestors. According to the original creation beliefs of the Delaware Indians, their forebears began life as animals in "Mother Earth" and emerged centuries later to hunt and live as men.

      The name Punxsutawney comes from the Indian name for the location
      "ponksad-uteney" which means "the town of the sandflies."
      The name woodchuck comes from the Indian legend of "Wojak,
      the groundhog" considered by them to be their ancestral grandfather.

    When German settlers arrived in the 1700s, they brought a tradition known as Candlemas Day, which has an early origin in the pagan celebration of Imbolc. It came at the mid-point between the Winter Solstice and the Spring Equinox. Superstition held that if the weather was fair, the second half of Winter would be stormy and cold. For the early Christians in Europe, it was the custom on Candlemas Day for clergy to bless candles and distribute them to the people in the dark of Winter. A lighted candle was placed in each window of the home. The day’s weather continued to be important. If the sun came out February 2, halfway between Winter and Spring, it meant six more weeks of wintry weather.

    The earliest American reference to Groundhog Day can be found at the Pennsylvania Dutch Folklore Center at Franklin and Marshall College:

      February 4, 1841 – from Morgantown, Berks County (Pennsylvania) storekeeper James Morris’ diary…"Last Tuesday, the 2nd, was Candlemas day, the day on which, according to the Germans, the Groundhog peeps out of his winter quarters and if he sees his shadow he pops back for another six weeks nap, but if the day be cloudy he remains out, as the weather is to be moderate."

    Groundhog Day and more animal news:
    Punxsutawney Phil stuffs the competition
    The origins of 13 enduring superstitions
    Punxsutawney Phil and 7 other animals who predict the future
    Will and Kate’s new puppy breed revealed!
    Elephant fitted with giant contact to heal injured eye

    h/t to Amy DiLuna, TODAY.com senior editor, doesn’t know from weather, but thinks that furry little meatball Phil is adorable and to Stormfax

    February 2, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side | , , , | 3 Comments