JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

March start of kitten, puppy season…

By LARISSA GRAHAM/The Lufkin Daily News

 This year, Lufkin Animal Control will take in approximately 7,000 dogs and cats for a variety of reasons, whether they are surrendered by their owners, dropped off as strays, or caught by animal control.

Of those, only 10 percent of the dogs and 2 percent of the cats will make it to new homes. The rest will be euthanized to make room for a constant flow of incoming animals.

According to Rhonda McLendon, director of Lufkin Animal Control, March marks the beginning of puppy and kitten season, when the shelter will see a huge increase in the numbers of puppies and kittens left with them.

“Unfortunately, a lot of folks out there bring us puppies and kittens. Almost every day this time of year we’ll get a litter,” McLendon said.

During the summer, the shelter will take in anywhere from 600 to 1,000 animals a month.

“We’re taking in vast numbers and we’re adopting a few and getting a few back to their owners and a few to rescues,” McLendon said. “The numbers are pretty ridiculous.”

The reason for their staggering intake numbers, McLendon said, is because people are allowing their pets, whether by choice or by accident, to reproduce.

“Way too many animals are being born, and there just aren’t enough homes out there for them,” McLendon said.

McLendon hopes that education will encourage more people to choose to spay or neuter their pets.

Currently, the city of Lufkin works with Southwood Drive Animal Clinic, allowing all animals adopted from animal control to be spayed or neutered for a much lower fee than a veterinarian would normally charge. The Humane Society has a low-cost spay and neuter program, as does O’Malley Alley Cat, which also offers trap-and-release programs.

“There’s folks out there that you can go to and get help for spay and neuter, but a lot of folks don’t because they don’t realize how bad the overpopulation problem is. They’re used to seeing their dog and their neighbor’s dog and maybe a few puppies. But if you come in here every day for a week you would be astounded at the number of animals that come through here,” McLendon said.

According to McLendon, the shelter’s capacity varies depending on the time of year. By the end of March, McLendon expects to house between 150 and 175 animals, with around 200 a day during the summer months. Because the shelter acts as an evacuation center, anywhere from 450 to 500 animals may stay there during a hurricane evacuation.

“Numbers are fairly high because the incoming animals fluctuate all the time,” McLendon said.

Dogs usually remain up for adoption for 30 days, depending on their health, temperament, adoptability and the time of year. During the summer months, dogs are euthanized at a faster rate because of a higher intake.

Cats do not stay as long, due to higher intake and lower adoption rates. On average, cats are euthanized after three weeks, but that drops down to two weeks during kitten season.

“Unfortunately there’s not a whole lot of folks that come to the shelter to adopt a cat,” McLendon said.

More smaller dogs are coming into the shelter than they did in previous years, McLendon said. There has been a problem with people trying to sell dogs at Walmart without a breeder permit, she said.

In order to sell dogs in Lufkin, one must have a permit, pay the applicable fees and, if the breeder lives inside city limits, go through an inspection. Out-of-town sellers still need the proper paperwork in order to sell dogs, McLendon said.

“Even if you’re selling them from your own home, as long as you’re in city limits, you need a permit,” McLendon said.

In addition to education about spaying and neutering, McLendon hopes to dispel some rumors surrounding dogs adopted from animal shelters.

Approximately 25 percent of all dogs that end up in shelters are pure bred, McLendon said.

“We see pit bulls and labs all the time,” McLendon said. “An enormous number of those come into the shelter.”

However, Animal Control will also see popular breeds like dachshunds, schnauzers, chihuahuas and poodles.

“Unless you’re wanting something that’s unusual, then the shelter has either got one or will be getting one. We’ll get the Yorkies in and we’ll get Akitas and some of the breeds that are not seen very often, too,” McLendon said. “We get a little of everything.”

According to McLendon, people will often bring in entire litters of lab puppies, believing that because they’re cute they’ll be adopted.

“There’s a good chance they won’t even go up for adoption because that same day I may get three or four more litters, and there’s so many,” McLendon said. “We’ll have 30 or 40 puppies come in and only two or three of them will get selected for adoption.”

Black dogs and cats have even less of a chance of adoption, McLendon added.

“The black labs are adopted less than any other dogs, and the black lab is the number one dog we see,” McLendon said.

When it comes to pure-bred cats, Animal Control sees mostly Siamese, though they will get other breeds on occasion.

“If you’re not wanting to spend a ton of money on a pet that is show quality, this is a good place to come,” McLendon said. “What we put up for adoption are high-quality pets.”

Another myth McLendon wants to put to rest is the idea that a dog goes into a shelter because it has temperament issues, or is sick or injured.

“We do get the ones that are sick, injured or with temperament problems, but we don’t put them on the adoption rows,” McLendon said. “The reason they’re here is because someone turns them in, they’re caught, or their owner surrenders them.”

McLendon stressed the importance of pet ID tags. According to McLendon, 95 percent of lost animals that are not wearing ID tags will not be reunited with their families.

In East Texas, many people believe their children need to see a pet have a litter of babies, McLendon said. However, she added, that is not the case.

“(Children) go through the birthing process in their science classes,” McLendon said. “What your kids need to learn is pet responsibility, and when you’re allowing your pet to have puppies or kittens that are not guaranteed homes from now on, chances are that one of them or their babies will come to the shelter are very high.”

There are just not enough homes for the massive intake of animals, McLendon said. If parents want their children to interact with puppies or kittens, or see pregnant pets, they are welcome to visit the shelter. There, children will be allowed to play with the puppies and kittens as long as they like.

“Teach (your kids) responsibility as far as pet overpopulation. It’s only going to get better when people are spaying or neutering,” McLendon said.

Other common misconceptions, McLendon added, include the belief that it is unhealthy to spay a female pet before she has had a litter of babies, and that animals who have been fixed will become fat or lazy. In female dogs, there is a much lower occurence of some cancers if they are spayed before they have puppies. Males who have been neutered are less likely to roam and get into fights over females. In addition, McLendon said, they may not be as territorial as a male dog who has not been neutered.

As for becoming fat and lazy, McLendon added that some dogs who become overweight were already predisposed to obesity, or they could be overfed. Spaying or neutering does not change activity level, McLendon said.

While a puppy may be cute, McLendon warned against adopting just for the ‘cute factor.’ While the puppy stage does not last long, it brings with it the chewing stage, along with the need for housebreaking and proper socialization. Some dogs in the shelter are already housebroken and may have been raised with children. In addition, the risk of chewing is greatly lower in adult dogs because they have already passed the teething stage.

“There’s just a lot of great things about adopting an adult dog,” McLendon said.

For more information on Animal Control or animals up for adoption, anyone interested may contact Animal Control at 633-0218.

Larissa Graham’s e-mail address – is: lgraham@lufkindailynews.comThe Lufkin Daily News

Being a pet parent requires responsibility and love, just like we give our human children, grandchildren and charges.  Part of being a responsible pet owner is making reproductions decisions and making sure there are homes for the pus and kittens, if there are some.  And those decisions is not always as one sided or uncomplicated as it may seem:

No Kill Nation: MANDATORY SPAY NEUTER LAWS ACROSS AMERICA HAVE LED TO:
▪ more animals killed
▪ more animals impounded
▪ increased animal control costs
▪ decreased licensing revenues.

www.floridaanimallaws.org

Ask Marion – JOMP

Posted:  Just One More Pet

March 10, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Elderly Chihuahua rescued from trash

LIVINGSTON — Animal control officer Kristin Lucas is used to finding animals in dire straits.

But on Wednesday, she saw something she had never seen before.

Someone had put an elderly Chihuahua in a garbage bag, tied the bag shut and thrown it into the Dumpster behind Sam’s Food City in Livingston.

chihuahua

(Merced Sun-Star) – This older male Chihuahua dog was put into a garbage bag that was tied shut and then thrown into a dumpster in Livingston. The dog was able to get his head out to breathe, and was rescued by Kristin Lucas, the animal control officer for the Livingston Police Department. He is currently recovering from his ordeal at a local veterinarian’s office.

An employee of the grocery store saw the dog. Thinking it was either dead or injured, the employee called Lucas.

“I looked in the Dumpster, and all I saw was a head sticking out of a tiny hole,” Lucas said. “The hole was just big enough for his head. He had obviously worked to get his head out so he could breathe.”

The dog was covered in urine and had suffered puncture wounds on his body, Lucas said. But other than that, and the fact that he was an older dog, there wasn’t much wrong with him.

Lucas took the dog to Valley Animal Hospital in Merced, where Christine McFadden is taking care of him.

“He’s an older dog, has some teeth issues, but not too bad,” McFadden said. “He also has some puncture wounds where it looks like an animal attacked him.”

Despite his wounds, McFadden said the dog won’t need surgery and is doing well.

Lucas said that throwing an unwanted pet into a Dumpster isn’t the way to deal with pets.

“If someone doesn’t want their dog, that’s what the shelter is there for,” Lucas said. “Most people don’t make a snap decision to get rid of their dog, they think about it for a while.”

She said if a dog is old or sick, having it put to sleep at a veterinarian’s office or at the animal shelter is the kindest way to deal with the pet.

The little male dog is neutered, according to McFadden, and should make someone who likes older dogs a good pet.

“This dog could have suffered a horrible, horrible death,” Lucas said. “Thank goodness someone found him before that happened.”

Anyone interested in the Chihuahua mix dog can call Lucas at the Livingston Police Department, 394-5585.

Just Another Example That We Need to Make Examples of Everyone that Does Something Like This to Animals!!!  The Laws against animal cruelty must be stiffened and every instance must be prosecuted to fullest extent of all laws and infractions that can be applied to the crime(s).  Ask Marion/JOMP

Source:  Annette Gongora’s facebook post

————-

Related Story:

ASPCA Rescue Tails: Kitten Survives Six Days in Duffel Bag

kittenIf one cat’s will to live could outmatch the strength of a heavy canvas bag, then surely one little kitten in Spokane County, WA, has the courage of a lion. Last week, two maintenance workers were testing garage doors at an apartment complex when they heard the muffled sounds of a distressed kitten coming from a large, heavy canvas duffel bag. The workers unzipped the bag only to find a second zipped duffel bag inside. When they opened the second bag, they discovered a frightened orange kitten, whom they promptly named Duff.

After giving him a much-needed bath, the rescuers called the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS)—an ASPCA Mission: Orange partner agency—to pick up and care for the tiny, suffering kitten.

“Duff was very lucky to be found,” says Animal Protection Officer Nicole Montano. “He probably would have died that day.”

Spokane Valley resident Donivan Crews later confessed to SCRAPS that he placed the kitten in the duffel bags six days prior to discovery. Crews was charged with confinement in an unsafe manner.

But this story of cruel abandonment has a very happy ending. One of Duff’s knights in shining armor adopted the lucky feline, who’s now recovering in a truly loving home.

“We are so grateful for the heroes who not only rescued this kitten but also took him into their hearts and home,” says Jackie E. Bell, SCRAPS Development Coordinator. “Duff will always have his name as a reminder of how he overcame such a tough start in life.”

Source:  ASPCA

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Related Posts:

    August 30, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

    Oh, by the way, there’s a goat in my trunk…

    Favre Goat Found in Woman's Trunk at Repair ShopWINONA, Minn. – A woman on her way to St. Paul really got the goat of auto repairman James Prusci. She went to Tires Plus in Winona Friday, wanting a belt replaced on her Chevy Malibu. While he was doing paperwork, she said she had a goat in her trunk. “A what?” he asked. She told him she planned to butcher it.

    It was painted Minnesota Viking colors — purple and gold — with Brett Favre’s No. 4 shaved on its side. Favre made his Vikings debut Friday in a preseason game.

    Prusci called animal control, which took the goat to a local vet. He was renamed Brett and placed in foster care.

    Animal control officer Wendy Peterson said Monday the city attorney was reviewing the case for possible citations.

    Source:  Winona Daily News, http://www.winonadailynews.com

    Posted:  Just One More Pet

    August 25, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

    Stop California SB 250 – Save Our Dogs and Our Rights

    I hate “the sky is falling, the sky is falling” as much as the next gal, but you know, when big hunks of blue stuff dotted with clouds are crashing into your head while you walk across the street, what are you gonna do?

    So, Californians who think that medical decisions about your animals should be made by you and your veterinarian and not the good folks in Sacramento, please check out this action alert from Laura Sanborn of Save Our Dogs, who says that despite recent amendments, the core provisions of California’s SB 250 are unchanged — and very similar to the defeated mandatory spay/neuter bill, last year’s AB 1634:

    Violate an animal control law even once and you may never be allowed to own an intact dog ever again. One violation and your intact licenses can be denied or revoked at any time, forever. No one can have intact dogs under those conditions. Suppose your county unknowingly hires a PETA member as head of animal control. In an effort to balance the budget, this person revokes and denies all intact licenses, including yours, generating millions of dollars in fines. He/She is fired six months later but it’s too late, your dogs have already been surgically sterilized. It’s not possible to reattach the parts even if they decide to give you back your licenses.

    This will cost local jurisdictions money. Say you get a citation for some minor animal control infraction. No longer can you just pay the ticket.  You have to fight tooth and nail every step of the way to preserve your future right to own intact dogs. If you lose you either get out of dogs or leave the state. Instead of getting a check for $50 in the mail, the county will have to hold a hearing, and maybe an appeal hearing, go to court, etc. In the end the county will pay thousands in staff costs to collect one $50 fine. It’s only $50 to the county, but it is your life with your dogs to you so you’ll do whatever it takes.

    The new fees for having intact licenses denied or revoked almost seem designed to drive dog owners underground. The state has a poor licensing compliance rate already, 10-30% compared to over 90% in Calgary. If you apply for a license and it is denied, you can be charged an additional fee for having the license denied. Maybe the local agency doesn’t charge such a fee now, but they may when it is time for renewal. Just one more thing to drive people away. And of course what will they do if you don’t pay the fee? Impound and kill your dogs, of course. You can’t even sell your dogs or give them away. You have to have a intact license to do that.

    All these new fees and punishments will be enforced with the threat of impounding your dog. Any law that impounds owned dogs or increases the cost of redeeming impounded dogs will kill dogs. Most owned dogs that are forcibly impounded are ultimately killed. Taking dogs from their owners is usually a death sentence. Increasing the costs to redeem a dog, especially with an 11% statewide unemployment rate, will kill dogs. Before they are killed, the impounded dogs will sit in the shelter for the state mandated waiting period. The state is required by the existing Hayden Act reimbursement mandate to pay local governments for this cost. The state already pays over $20 million a year for this reimbursement. How many more fire fighters, police officers, teachers, and nurses will have to be laid off to cover the addition reimbursement the state will have to pay out if SB 250 passes?

    We fail to see the point of this bill. There is no action that is currently legal that SB 250 makes illegal. All it appears to accomplish is give local animal control the power to forcibly spay/neuter as many dogs as possible. What it does do is make responsible pet owners afraid of their local animal control agency. This will reduce licensing compliance and licensing fee income. It will increase the cost of enforcement. Fewer dogs will be adopted because the public will avoid contact with the shelters. More dogs will be impounded. More dogs will be killed.

    SB 250, The Pet Owner Punishment Act, just kills dogs and strips pet owners and people in general of another right.

    This is a terrible and stupid law. It will not do what it claims to want to do, and it will worsen the lives of pet owners, cost money, and kill pets. Please follow these simple action steps and help stop SB 250. Act now!

    UPDATE: Gina mentioned this in the comments, but I’m adding it here, too: Alley Cat Allies is urging Californians to contact their legislators to speak against SB 250, saying it will hurt stray, homeless, and feral cats. You can read their take on it, and use their action tool, here.

    Source:  PetConnection.com

    SB 250 – full Senate votes this week!

    Posted:  Just One More Pet

    Related Articles:

    June 2, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rescues, Just One More Pet, Pet Blog, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, Stop Euthenization | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments