JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Elderly Chihuahua rescued from trash

LIVINGSTON — Animal control officer Kristin Lucas is used to finding animals in dire straits.

But on Wednesday, she saw something she had never seen before.

Someone had put an elderly Chihuahua in a garbage bag, tied the bag shut and thrown it into the Dumpster behind Sam’s Food City in Livingston.

chihuahua

(Merced Sun-Star) – This older male Chihuahua dog was put into a garbage bag that was tied shut and then thrown into a dumpster in Livingston. The dog was able to get his head out to breathe, and was rescued by Kristin Lucas, the animal control officer for the Livingston Police Department. He is currently recovering from his ordeal at a local veterinarian’s office.

An employee of the grocery store saw the dog. Thinking it was either dead or injured, the employee called Lucas.

“I looked in the Dumpster, and all I saw was a head sticking out of a tiny hole,” Lucas said. “The hole was just big enough for his head. He had obviously worked to get his head out so he could breathe.”

The dog was covered in urine and had suffered puncture wounds on his body, Lucas said. But other than that, and the fact that he was an older dog, there wasn’t much wrong with him.

Lucas took the dog to Valley Animal Hospital in Merced, where Christine McFadden is taking care of him.

“He’s an older dog, has some teeth issues, but not too bad,” McFadden said. “He also has some puncture wounds where it looks like an animal attacked him.”

Despite his wounds, McFadden said the dog won’t need surgery and is doing well.

Lucas said that throwing an unwanted pet into a Dumpster isn’t the way to deal with pets.

“If someone doesn’t want their dog, that’s what the shelter is there for,” Lucas said. “Most people don’t make a snap decision to get rid of their dog, they think about it for a while.”

She said if a dog is old or sick, having it put to sleep at a veterinarian’s office or at the animal shelter is the kindest way to deal with the pet.

The little male dog is neutered, according to McFadden, and should make someone who likes older dogs a good pet.

“This dog could have suffered a horrible, horrible death,” Lucas said. “Thank goodness someone found him before that happened.”

Anyone interested in the Chihuahua mix dog can call Lucas at the Livingston Police Department, 394-5585.

Just Another Example That We Need to Make Examples of Everyone that Does Something Like This to Animals!!!  The Laws against animal cruelty must be stiffened and every instance must be prosecuted to fullest extent of all laws and infractions that can be applied to the crime(s).  Ask Marion/JOMP

Source:  Annette Gongora’s facebook post

————-

Related Story:

ASPCA Rescue Tails: Kitten Survives Six Days in Duffel Bag

kittenIf one cat’s will to live could outmatch the strength of a heavy canvas bag, then surely one little kitten in Spokane County, WA, has the courage of a lion. Last week, two maintenance workers were testing garage doors at an apartment complex when they heard the muffled sounds of a distressed kitten coming from a large, heavy canvas duffel bag. The workers unzipped the bag only to find a second zipped duffel bag inside. When they opened the second bag, they discovered a frightened orange kitten, whom they promptly named Duff.

After giving him a much-needed bath, the rescuers called the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS)—an ASPCA Mission: Orange partner agency—to pick up and care for the tiny, suffering kitten.

“Duff was very lucky to be found,” says Animal Protection Officer Nicole Montano. “He probably would have died that day.”

Spokane Valley resident Donivan Crews later confessed to SCRAPS that he placed the kitten in the duffel bags six days prior to discovery. Crews was charged with confinement in an unsafe manner.

But this story of cruel abandonment has a very happy ending. One of Duff’s knights in shining armor adopted the lucky feline, who’s now recovering in a truly loving home.

“We are so grateful for the heroes who not only rescued this kitten but also took him into their hearts and home,” says Jackie E. Bell, SCRAPS Development Coordinator. “Duff will always have his name as a reminder of how he overcame such a tough start in life.”

Source:  ASPCA

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Related Posts:

    August 30, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

    Adopt a Senior Pet…

    Senior animals can be superior companions for human seniors. They aren’t overly energetic (like puppies and kittens), don’t need to be housebroken and know not to scratch or chew the furniture. Moreover, it’s not true that “old dogs can’t learn new tricks”

    Broadway animal trainer William Berloni adopts all of his performing animals from shelters and prefers mature animals, saying they are happy to accept new living patterns in exchange for obtaining “a new leash on life.” And, since young animals are the most frequently adopted, you’ll also have the satisfaction of knowing that you may well have saved your new pet’s life.

    By:  Sara Whalen of Pets Alive

    Posted:  TrueHealthIsTrueWealth http://truehealthistruewealth.blogspot.com 

    November 21, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

    November Is Adopt-A-Senior-Pet Month

    NOVEMBER IS ADOPT-A-SENIOR-PET MONTH

    Thinking of adopting? Consider a senior pet. They’ve often already learned the important things, like household manners, and are happy just to sit in your lap or by your feet.

     best_friends

    A Companion Animal’s Golden Years

    Our companion animals rocket through infancy in six short months, struggle though an adolescence that seems like forever but it’s actually only 12 to 18 months, and then reach that plateau known as adulthood – ages 2 to 8. Before we know it, Mojo and Belle have reached their Golden Years.

    As with every stage of life, cats and dogs in their golden years demand some special considerations. For example, not unlike their human caretakers, geriatric dogs and cats slow down – in some cases way down. Older animals tend to sleep more soundly and for longer periods. It is more difficult to roust them out of bed in the morning, and they may become a bit more snapish if startled out of a slumber. A soft, orthopedic foam bed with a machine-washable pile cover (essential for cleaning up old-age accidents) becomes indispensible for arthritic bones that seek warmth and comfort.

    Because of changes in metabolism, an older animal is unable to regulate his body heat the way he used to. A thinning coat doesn’t help matters either. Older pets feel colder in the winter and hotter in the summer that they did in their middle years, so winter sweaters may be advisable even for breeds that never needed them before. Summer walks may need to be shorter or taken at the coolest time of the day.

    Four of the five senses diminish with age, leaving only the sense of touch as acute as it was in more youthful days. Hearing loss is noted by owners who feel that their companion has tuned tuned them out. Such a loss may help to explain why older animals seem to sleep more soundly or react more aggressively to being woken up.

    Loss of the sense of smell can be quite dismaying for owners who rely on their working dogs’ noses to perform tasks such as drug detection, search and rescue or tracking. (Although I do know a few beagle and basset hound owners who are excitedly looking forward to the day when their dogs will be less scent-oriented on their strolls outdoors.)

    A diminshed sense of smell can be more serious for felines than for dogs, because cats rely on the aroma of food for their appetite. Some geriatric cats have been know to waste away as their sense of smell waned. You can avoid such an outcome by purchasing a more aromatic food or heating up the regular entree, thus releasing a stronger odor.

    Cloudy lenses, cataracts and eye dieseases may dim the sense of sight in your older pet. Most companion animals compensate extremely well for loss of vision and move about abode with a sense of ease. Sometimes an owner does not realize that a pet has gone blind until the furniture is moved and an animal loses it’s way in unfamiliar terrain. A reluctance to leave the house by a dog that once cherished his walks may have its roots in diminishing vision. A trip to the veterinary opthamologist may be in order.

    Like their human counterparts, many older animals gain too much weight. Obesity is due to reduced activity, overfeeding, and a lowert metabolic rate. The additional weight stresses the heart and can exacerbate arthritis, resulting in an animal that is even less likely to exercise.

    How do you help a fat cat or plump pooch? Diet and exercise. Foods that can be found at both grocery stores and specialty shops are formulated with the senior companion in mind. Prescription diets are available for cats and dogs with heart, liver and kidney problems. Moderate play can keep muscles toned, blood circulating, and, perhaps most important of all, the digestive system moving. In other words, play can prevent constipation – a very serios problem, particularly in older cats.

    Mojo and Belle’s senior years area time that demands owner alertness. Weigh your companion every three months. Bring weight swings in either direction to your veterinarian’s attention, for they could indicate a serious medical problem such as diabetes. Frequent grooming sessions will also keep you in touch with any physical changes. Keep your eyes and nose open for tumors, lesions, lumps, discolorations or bad breath, and report any such changes to your veterinarian. Early treatment can prolong your caompanion’s life considerably.

    Behaviorally, a cat or dog may become set in his ways and resist change. Slow introductions to new environments and activities are in order. Don’t fall for the old saying. “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks”! Of course you can; it just takes a little longer. Old Dogs, Old Friends, a new book by Chris Walkowicz and Dr. Bonnie Wilcox, is filled with stories of dozens of canines who took up new activities in their golden years.

    For those who think that bringing in a new, younger companion into the household will put some life into their old boy or girl, think again! If Mojo or Belle has been the “only child” a new addition can add more stress than he or she can bear and cause the animal to go off it’s feed, become snapish and irritable , or go into hiding. It could also lower it’s resistance to disease.

    However, if your dog or cat has always been a part of a mulit-animal menagerie and is in relatively good health, a new household member may fit with little fuss.

    Although geriatric cats and dogs are seldom the ideal new companion for a young child, they do quite well presiding over a full-time working household or sharing retirement with a senior citizen. If you are interested in providing a few quality years for a feline or canine senior that has fallen on hard times, go to your local animal shelter or SPCA and make your wishes known to the adoption counselors. A geriatric companion is waiting to wash your face and warm your heart – not to mention your feet. Ah, the “tails” they can tell!

    We all want our pet dogs to live as long as possible, but the fact of the matter is that on average, certain dog breeds live longer than others. This might be a consideration when choosing a dog breed and it is therefore useful information to know before hand.

    The average life span of the North American or European dog is 12.8 years. This is a large increase in life span over the past 100 years and is mostly attributable to better food and better medical care. Within this 12.8 year average for all dogs is a large range of life spans where certain breeds live longer and certain breeds live less long. In general, larger dogs live shorter lives than smaller dogs. This is due to the fact that the bodies of larger dogs must work harder (are more stressed) than the bodies of smaller dogs. That said, the life expectancy of any one dog in particular is ALSO determined by the stresses in its life (both physical and psychological), what it eats and how well it is taken care of.

    There are, however, dogs that are living and living healthy lives to between 16 and 20+ years depending on their breed, their environment and how they are taken care of.  Pets like humans who take care of themselves are living longer.  Our pets, however, are dependent on us for their longevity.

    Source: PetFinder

    Old Dogs, Old Friends: Enjoying Your Older Dog


    November 13, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

    Shelters Full of Chihuahuas

    By FIELDING BUCK
    The Press-Enterprise
     

    “Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” which earned $29 million over the weekend and topped the Inland box office, is alarming some animal advocates who fear it will lead to an upswing in abandonment.

    “I’m appalled by this movie,” said Meredith Brittain, who runs a small pet-rescue operation in Devore.

    Rescuers say they were already overrun with abandoned Chihuahuas because of the stalled economy’s impact on pet owners and media overexposure to the breed from Taco Bell commercials and Paris Hilton paparazzi shots.

    The arrival of an eye-poppingly cute Disney picture filled with talking critters is the equivalent of one more bank closure, they say.

    “It’s been the worst year ever,” said Ann Pollock, of a San Diego County Chihuahua rescue operation.

    Experts urge people who may be thinking about getting a Chihuahua to adopt at a shelter or rescue agency instead of breeders, stores or online ads. People who have seen “Beverly Hills Chihuahua” say it may send a positive message about abandoned animals. The title character is homeless after being stolen.

          

    Carrie Rosema / The Press-Enterprise
    Shelter officials say people interested in adopting Chihuahuas do their research and don’t judge animals solely on looks.

    Both its canine leads were adopted by the film’s animal trainer. Rusco, the male who plays Papi, was saved from Moreno Valley Animal Shelter in November 2006, after his owner refused to claim him.

    “Fantastic movie! I loved it,” said Denise Raymond, office supervisor for animal services, who went over the weekend just to see Rusco’s big debut.

    The fear, however, is that the film will cause a repeat of what happened in 1996 when Disney released its live-action “101 Dalmatians.” Filmgoers rushed out to purchase purebred puppies they quickly found they didn’t want.

    Brittain said problems begin with buying instead of adopting.

    “They buy puppies. They dump them when they turn into dogs.”

    Brittain fears people will see “Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” go out and buy a male and female and then try to sell the resulting litter at $50 a pup.

          

    Experts urge people who may be thinking about getting a Chihuahua to adopt at a shelter or rescue agency instead of stores.

    She said a “flood of unwanted dogs” has created gridlock in the rescue system. If potential owners are waiting, then rescuers can’t place the dogs.

    “We’re doing this out of our grocery money, most of us,” Brittain added.

    She said can she can only handle one or two dogs at a time and does not publicize her activities because if she did she would get eight to 10 calls a day.

    There is a high percentage of Chihuahuas in the animal-rescue system, experts say.

    Kathleen Summers, program assistant, for puppy mills with the Humane Society of the United States, said that when the organization heard about the “Beverly Hills Chihuahua, it did an informal survey of Southern California shelters.

    “Almost all of them said they were the most common breed they rescue.” She said five had Chihuahuas come in on the day of the call.

    Rescue Me… Please!
          

    Carrie Rosema / The Press-Enterprise
    Stacie Gendreaux, of the Riverside County Department of Animal Services, holds a Chihuahua.

    Brian Cronin, division chief for San Bernardino County Animal Care and Control, said that on Monday there were 21 Chihuahuas or Chihuahua mixes and about 50 small-breed dogs out of 172 dogs in the shelter system and 297 animals total.

    Among them are two “five-week-old guys” that had to be bottle-nursed in foster homes provided by staff.

    John Welsh, spokesman for Riverside County Department of Animal Services, said that on Monday there were 94 Chihuahuas or Chihuahua mixes in the county’s four shelters.

    Determination of breed is done by the staff. “None of our animals ever have papers,” Welsh said.

    Teryn Hartnett, Riverside County’s senior animal behaviorist, said the region’s shelters see a lot of pit bulls and Chihuahuas because of “two different demographics”: the people who breed pit bulls for defense and the people who see paparazzi favorite Paris Hilton posing for photo ops with her pet, Tinkerbell.

    A happy ending isn’t guaranteed animals that enter the shelter system. Welsh said Riverside County handles about 30,000 animals a year and about half have find homes. The rest are euthanized.

    “It’s a statistic we’re always trying to improve.”

    Cronin and Robert Miller, director of Riverside County Animal Services, took steps to neutralize the impact of “Beverly Hills Chihuahua.” They are on the board of California Animal Control Directors Association, which drafted a letter of Disney president and CEO Robert Igor.

    Dated Aug. 8 and signed by board president Kathleen Brown, it states that in California shelters, one animal is euthanized every 63 seconds and that “Chihuahuas are small, easy to acquire and frequently abused in high-volume breeding operations.”

    Cronin and Welsh said that Disney responded by including a pitch for responsible pet ownership in the film’s publicity.

    Chihuahuas are high-energy dogs that require a high level of commitment. Hartnett said one factor to consider is whether you’ll enjoy taking them for regular walks.

    Chihuahuas will be a companion for a long time. Small dogs can live up to 20 years, Hartnett said.

    “That dog might be in their house longer than the children,” she observed.

    She advises people who are thinking about adopting animals do their research on breeds and then bring their whole families to shelters to meet the animals. Don’t judge on looks or color, she said. Judge on temperament.

    Summers advised people to be realistic in their expectations. “Beverly Hills Chihuahua.”

    “They don’t understand the difference between a cute Chihuahua that jumps into your arms in the movie and a Chihuahua in your house.”

    Riverside County: www.rcdas.org

    San Bernardino County: www.sbcounty.gov/acc

    Moreno Valley Animal Services: www.moreno-valley.ca.us/resident_services/animal/ index_animal.shtml

    Permalink: https://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2008/10/10/sheltors-full-of-chihuahuas/

    Possibly related posts: (automatically generated)

     

    October 10, 2008 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

    Adopting A Senior Pet Has Many Advantage For Families and Seniors

    When Kathy Simko brought home her newly adopted dog, a 9-year-old Chesapeake Bay retriever named “Maggie,” she quickly discovered that her canine companion was full of pleasant surprises

    “I asked my sister if she thought Maggie might enjoy going for a walk,” Simko recalls. “As soon as I said it, Maggie jumped up and began wagging her tail. She pranced across the kitchen, picked up her leash in her mouth and brought it to me. Not only did she love going for walks, but I found out she was perfectly leash trained. In fact, she was wonderfully trained in just about every way.” 

    Many older dogs and cats are full of pleasant surprises like Maggie.They’re mature, well-mannered and eager to spend time around people. Those are but a few of the reasons why pet experts say a mature dog or cat is the ideal match for the person or family who craves companionship, but doesn’t have the time, energy or financial resources that a puppy or kitten requires. 

    Behavior & Training   

    The popular phrase “what you see is what you get” rings true for mature mutts and calm cats.  Their new Pet Parents know in advance how they get along with other pets and small children, not to mention whether they enjoy getting a bath, riding in the car and how they behave at the veterinarian’s office or groomer.  Because puppies and kittens don’t reach maturity until they’re about a year old (even 2 years in the case of some dog breeds), it can be difficult to predict how they’ll ultimately react to different stimuli or situations.  

    “Older animals are fully grown and their true personalities are apparent,” says Ellen Clark, operations director for the Wisconsin Humane Society.  “There are few surprises with an older pet.”  

    Even better, many older dogs and cats have already been housetrained and they’re beyond the destructive chewing and scratching stages, Clark says. As a result, their Pet Parents don’t need to invest in training classes, chew toys or puppy pads. Older dogs and cats also enjoy a good night’s sleep just as much as their Pet Parents. Unlike puppies and kittens, they don’t need comforting or a potty break at 3 a.m.  

    “And, you can teach an old dog new tricks if you need to,” Clarksays. “They’re often easier to train because they are mellow and they can focus on you. They learn quickly.”  

    Age-Appropriate   

    Mature pets are a good choice for people young and old. Families with small children are wise to consider getting a grown dog or cat who’s already lived in a home with kids and is accustomed to a child’s running, squealing and rambunctious play. Some puppies and kittens are frightened by children and could react with aggressive behavior, such as nipping or scratching.  Puppies especially can become over-stimulated when playing with children and might accidentally bite or scratch. And, kittens and puppies have sharper claws and teeth which can result in a more serious injury.  

    At the same time, research suggests that pets can improve senior citizens’ physical and emotional health. Older dogs that don’t need long walks or strenuous exercise and calm cats who prefer a quiet household, are a perfect match for older Pet Parents.  

    Medical Matters  

    Aprille Hollis, public information officer for Maricopa County Animal Control (MCACC) in Phoenix, says that some adopters shy away from mature dogs and cats because they wrongly assume that older pets will develop health problems.  

    “A puppy or kitten can get sick or suffer medical problems just as easily as an older dog or cat.  Any pet can get sick or hurt at any age,” she says.  

    Instead, Pet Parents are likely to discover that many of their new companion’s veterinary needs have already been taken care of by the previous owner or, in the case of shelter pets, by a shelter veterinarian.  For example, many older dogs and cats have already been spayed or neutered.  They’ve also already received the first series of vaccinations necessary to protect them from deadly diseases, such as parvovirus and distemper in dogs and feline leukemia in cats.  That means they’ll need only annual booster shots to stay healthy.  

    Fewer Fees … or Free!  

    Because older dogs and cats are more difficult to place than kittens and puppies, many shelters across the country reduce or waive their adoption fees. It’s not uncommon to see adoption fees for pets older than 5 or 6 years of age reduced by 25 to 50 percent vs. younger dogs, cats, kittens and puppies.  

    “Our adoption fee for dogs and cats aged 5 years and older can be considerably lower because it’s harder to find homes for these pets.Everyone wants the puppies and kittens,” says MCACC’s Hollis. “For example, our puppies can range from $100 to $150, while the fee for an older can be $65.”  

    At WHS, Clark adds, there is no fee to adopt a cat aged 1 year and older (adopters are still carefully pre-screened to ensure a safe and responsible match).  

    “The cats are already spayed or neutered, fully vaccinated and implanted with an identification microchip,” she says.  “We found that our kittens are adopted very quickly, and by not charging a fee for the older cats, we can find them ‘forever homes’ much more quickly too.”   

    Finding an Older Pet 

    If getting an older pet makes sense, here are a few options for finding one: 

    Check newspaper and Internet classified ads. You’ll find scores of family pets for sale or even “free to good home.”   

    Looking for a particular breed of pet? Consult a breed-specific rescue organization. Many breed-rescue groups utilize a network of volunteer foster-care providers to care for homeless animals until they find a permanent home. 

    Visit your local humane society or animal control facility. An estimated 6 to 8 million dogs and cats end up in U.S. shelters every year, but only half of them find homes. Many shelters now have links on their web sites so prospective adopters can see pictures of available pets before driving to the shelter. 

    Looking to adopt an older pet? See pets for adoption in your zip code at adoptions.petsmart.com

    Written by: Kimberly Noetzel / PetSmart Charities

    Dogs
    Permalink: https://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2008/09/29/adopting-a-sen…ie-and-seniors/ 

    September 29, 2008 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments