JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Smartest Dog In the World, Chaser – 60 Minutes With Anderson Cooper

By Marion Algier – Just One More Pet (JOMP)  –  Cross-Posted at AskMarion

Anderson Cooper met Chaser, a dog who can identify over a thousand toys, and because of whom, scientists are now studying the brain of man’s best friend.  Chaser is also the subject of a book:  Chaser: Unlocking the Genius of the Dog Who Knows a Thousand Words.

Man and dog have lived together for 15,000 years and there are now more than 80 million dogs in the United States, more dogs than children, yet we know very little about man’s best friend.

Did you know that when your dog(s) stare at you, they are hugging you with their eyes?!?

Video: 60 Minutes October 5, 2014 – Anderson Cooper- Chaser – Smart Dog Segment

Video: The Dog Who Knows 1,000 Words | CUTE ANIMALS (Episode 5)

And, there’s even more to smart dogs than what ’60 Minutes’ and Chaser showed you says Arlene Weintraub, author of – Heal: The Vital Role of Dogs in the Search for Cancer Cures.

The hit CBS CBS -0.48% newsmagazine 60 Minutes just re-ran what was no doubt one of its most popular segments of recent years, “The Smartest Dog in the World,” featuring Chaser, the border collie who learned more than 1,000 words and names. As shown in the segment, Chaser accomplished that incredible feat because her owner, retired psychology professor John Pilley, spent five hours a day, five days a week training the white-and-black spotted pooch to associate certain words with objects such as toys.

As a result, Chaser ended up with a vocabulary three times greater than that of the average toddler. It’s impressive, to be sure, especially since very little was known about the power of the canine brain until quite recently, as correspondent Anderson Cooper pointed out at the top of the piece.

Over the last two decades, however, the scientific community has started to delve more deeply into canine intelligence, unlocking the clues to what’s happening in their brains that makes dogs so seemingly human. Here are some of the latest insights:

Dogs aren’t just learning tricks when you train them—they’re actually getting smarter.

Not everyone can spare the time that Pilley took to train his dog to recognize so many words, but science has proven that, in fact, dogs that stay mentally engaged do get smarter.

For example, researchers at the University of Milan recently took a group of 110 dogs, half of whom had little or no training in obedience or any other skill, and the other half who had extremely sophisticated levels of schooling, in agility, search-and-rescue, and the like. All of the dogs were then challenged to find food that had been hidden—but only after they were shown how the treats would be hidden and what they would have to do to uncover them.

As dog psychology expert and author Stanley Coren reported on the Psychology Today blog, it was clear that the dogs in the trial who had spent a lot of time training to do challenging tasks had gained a leg up on the intelligence scale: Only 30% of the untrained dogs found the hidden food, while 61% of the trained dogs successfully completed the task—even though their previous training didn’t prepare them for this particular test.

The scientists concluded that the trained dogs had acquired a “’learning to learn’ ability” that is otherwise absent in the average dog.

Studies show that dogs trained in complex tasks like agility gain intelligence (Credit: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

That insight jives with what one of the scientists featured in the 60 Minutes piece, Brian Hare, pointed out. “What’s special is that [Pilley] spent so much time playing these games to help her learn words, but are there lots of Chasers out there?” said Hare, an evolutionary anthropologist at Duke University during the piece. “Absolutely.”

In other words, any mutt can probably be as good as Chaser—if his or her owner is willing to put in the hours.

Dogs can smell cancer and other things we can’t because of how their brains are structured.

It’s long been known that dogs’ noses are extremely sensitive—a virtue that has made them indispensable as search-and-rescue aides for centuries. But only recently have scientists begun to unlock the mysteries behind how dogs can pick up and follow scents that no one else can.

What they’ve learned is that dogs have 200 million olfactory receptors (ORs), or proteins on the neurons inside their snouts that send signals to their brains, allowing them to process smells. We human have only five million ORs. Dogs’ nostrils are structured so intricately that they can detect odors at such miniscule levels as parts per trillion, and many experts believe the proportion of the dog’s brain that’s dedicated to analyzing those scents is 40 times larger than that of humans. That makes the dog’s ability to recognize particular odors one million times better than that of people.

Dogs’ noses are now being put to use beyond the realm of search-and-rescue. In the medical world, service dogs are being trained to help people with diabetes recognize when their blood sugar is dropping to dangerous levels. And much attention has been paid recently to reports that dogs can sniff cancer.

The notion that dogs might be able to detect cancer first emerged about 25 years ago, when the British medical journal The Lancet published a five-paragraph letter in which two doctors in London described the case of a forty-four-year-old woman, who came into their clinic with a lesion on her left thigh. She told them her Doberman–border collie mix was constantly sniffing a mole on her leg, and one day when she was wearing shorts, her dog tried to bite the mole off entirely. Turned out that mole was a malignant melanoma—and the dog saved his owner’s life, because the tumor was so small at that point the cancer could be cured.

Since then, dog-loving scientists all over the world have trained and then tested hundreds of dogs to prove they can smell cancer. The results are sometimes astounding: In a 2012 trial, sniffer dogs were able to identify the scent of lung cancer about 90% of the time, even when the scientists tried to confuse them with samples from patients with non-cancerous conditions like chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD). Dogs have also been successfully trained to detect ovarian, breast, bladder, and colorectal cancer. Multiple efforts are now underway to translate the dog’s nose into automated breathalyzer-like devices that may be able to detect cancer early.

Dogs are wired for empathy in ways that many other species are not.

During the 60 Minutes story we heard a lot about oxytocin, commonly called “the love hormone.” This is a hormone, made in the brains of both dogs and people, that promotes the bonding between mothers and their babies, for example, and makes us feel good when we hug a loved one. Turns out when dogs make eye contact with their people or jump in their laps, both dogs and the recipients of their affection get more of an oxytocin rush.

But are dogs empathetic? Do they feel our emotional pain and joy? Several studies suggest they do. For example, in 2013, a group of Japanese researchers showed that the phenomenon of contagious yawning—long believed to be a sign of empathy—does not just happen among people. The scientists observed 25 dogs yawning in response to the yawns of both their owners and those of people they did not know. They measured the dogs’ heart rate to show that their yawning was not caused by stress (as many dog trainers believe it is).

Dogs may also be empathetic because in addition to sharing the love hormone with their humans, they share the stress hormone, called cortisol. Last fall, researchers in New Zealand took 75 dogs and 74 people and played the same sounds for both groups: a baby crying, a baby babbling and white noise. When they heard the crying baby, both people and dogs showed an increase in cortisol. The dogs’ behavior changed, too, as they became more submissive and alert. The researchers concluded that the dogs were showing “emotional contagion,” a basic form of empathy. What’s more, the empathy crossed species—a rare occurrence, they suggested.

‘Dogs Have The Intelligence of a Human Toddler’ and bottom line, your dog is probably just as smart as Chaser, both intellectually and emotionally.  I know mine are! You just might need to do a bit of work to uncover that intelligence.  Age, breed and owner or trainer involvement are all factors.

A Quebec bill has changed animals from “property” to sentient beings and includes jail time for cruelty in Canada.  Let us hope that the United States and the rest of the world will not be far behind.  Especially with daily headlines like these: China, Korea, South East Asia: Stop Cooking Dogs, Any Animals, AliveWeasel of the Weak –> The Monster Who Tortured And Abused This Dog, Teen Who Killed Kitten Only Had to Serve One Year in Prison, Buried Alive Because She Was A Nuisance This Stray Dog Has Become An Inspiration and Copycat Dog Muzzle Duct Taping Crime?.  Even livestock who are ultimately slated to end up on our dinner tables deserve human treatment throughout their lives!

Hopefully, WE, human animals are finally realizing that all animals have value and deserve fair and better treatment, beginning with domesticated animals that we share our lives with. To whom much is given, much is expected! And because we are the most intelligent animals with the largest brain, at least on our planet, we must be much better than we are!

June 15, 2015 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Safe Haven for Pets… For Animals

One of my dreams for quite some time has been to purchase land (in the US) and set up a temporary (and forever for some) haven for pets/animals.  I would love to hire some computer wiz-kids to set up a national registry to connect all the shelters, rescues, etc. around the country so people looking for them, a particular pet can find them.  Then set-up a network to transport the pets to the people who want them, their forever homes.  And for those who need longer, they could come to us, to the center, until their forever home comes available or their forever parents find them. 

I believe there is a forever home for every pet… for every animal and they we are all God’s creatures, so need to work together.

Marion at JOMP~

So this really touches my heart!!

Embedded image permalink

Tribune:

Ayesha Chundrigar with an ACF shelter dog. ALL PHOTOS COURTESY: AYESHA CHUNDRIGAR FOUNDATION

Growing up in a house full of pets gave Ayesha Chundrigar an informal, intuitive education in empathy and respect for animals at a young age. She was only nine years old when she began volunteering at an orphanage during her summer holidays, and by the age of 15 she was teaching at various non-profit schools in katchi abadis around Islamabad, where she was living at the time. She was also helping at refugee camps in the city in the aftermath of the 2005 earthquake in the northern areas of Pakistan, but her true altruism shone through when she launched her NGO, the Ayesha Chundrigar Foundation (ACF), in Karachi, which among other things, aims at giving a voice to the voiceless – animals.

Apart from the Pakistan Animal Welfare Society (PAWS), ACF is now the second non-profit organisation which aims to rescue abandoned, abused or injured stray animals. Chundrigar who took up the challenge of managing and maintaining Edhi Foundation’s animal shelter in Karachi, says that the place was in an abysmal state when she first visited it. “There were animal carcasses and dead puppies and donkeys lying in pools of blood. I still have nightmares about it,” she says. “I found the number of a vet listed on a board close to the shelter and gave him a call saying he had to help me and that was it.”

All animals coexist in perfect harmony at the shelter.

Chundrigar started with four dogs and some savings. The shelter now houses over 100 animals, including donkeys, dogs, cats, eagles and pigeons. Although she has used up all her savings, she finds her job truly worthwhile. ACF has rescued over 600 animals in Karachi and has long-term plans of opening its own animal sanctuary instead of only managing Edhi’s animal shelter. “We have been given a piece of land for 10 years and we are ready to begin construction,” informs Chundrigar, adding that the new shelter will be able to house over 300 animals, with designated sections for donkeys, cats, dogs and other rescued animals.

Although the current shelter lacks electricity and water supplies, the Edhi Foundation is making do. They are preparing to install a water tank and solar panels. The animals are fed fresh food every morning and there is a general atmosphere of hope and recovery. “Our cats and puppies eat together and play together,” says Chundrigar. “I can stay and look at these sights forever.”

But this is not always the case. “Dogs have come in a paralysed and crippled [state] or with horrific wounds, but I’m lucky enough to see miracles every day. These animals [eventually] become strong, loving creatures that shower you with unconditional love.”

Dr Farid nurses the fore limbs of a donkey at one of the camps.

At the present, ACF’s core team of seven members, including Chundrigar, volunteer. The only ones on a payroll are their three veterinarians: Dr Khalid Memon, ACF’s senior vet who is a professor at the Baqai Veterinary College in Karachi, Ghulam Farid, a junior vet who is a final year veterinary student at Baqai, and Salman Wali, a manager and trainee vet at Baqai.  Together they embrace the animals that society discards.

With the help of Edhi Foundation’s service, ACF conducts most of its rescue missions around the city in an ambulance. Public transport, however, is also used by vets when the ambulance is unavailable. Once the injured animal has been rescued, its wounds are treated and then begins the long rehabilitation process.

Ayesha Chundrigar with her team at a recent donkey camp.

Although most rescue operations end on a happy note, some have tragic endings. When Chundrigar first saw the image of a female dog, with a disfigured face lying on the ground almost lifeless, on Facebook, she didn’t just comment on the extreme sorrow she felt, instead she took a hands-on approach. “Five of her puppies were snuggled near her tummy [in the picture] and I sent my team to rescue them [from Chundrigar Road],” she says. “The wounds … were definitely a few days old, her eye sockets were empty and she was severely dehydrated and malnourished, but by some miracle she stayed alive to feed her babies. We bandaged her up and started her treatment,” she says, adding that the puppies were fed formula milk although their mother was still determined to feed them herself. Although after a day the dog had gained enough strength to stand up on its own and take a few steps, she eventually succumbed to her injuries. “Unfortunately her wounds were too deep and after I petted her for hours and gently explained to her that I’d take care of her puppies, she let go.”

But dampened spirits don’t last at ACF for long as the team finds solace in the animals they have successfully rescued and rehabilitated. Bravo, a dog so thin and malnourished that he could barely lift his head, was nursed to health by Farid who was determined to see him stand on his feet. After several blood tests, X-rays and consistent monitoring, Bravo has not only regained its health but is currently ACF’s guard dog. “[Bravo is the] biggest, strongest and healthiest dogs at the shelter,” Chundrigar says proudly. “He gives me the warmest, most welcoming hugs every time I see him.”

ACF also holds regular donkey camps. “The way donkeys are treated in this country kills me and I wanted to somehow change that,” says Chundrigar. “The donkey camps started with literally just me and my senior vet standing on the roadside in [areas where donkey-carts are readily used], asking people to let us medically treat their donkeys for free.” While initially Chundrigar’s team was met with suspicion, with some cart owners believing that they were here to harm their sole source of income, they soon warmed up to them once they were convinced that the team was only there to help. Over 50 donkeys are fed and treated free of charge twice a month, in various parts of Karachi, including Sohrab Goth, Korangi and Nipa Chowrangi. ACF also conducted a ‘hydration drive’ last year when biscuits and chilled water bottles were distributed to people around the city.

Dr Farid gives one of the dogs eye treatment at the Edhi Foundation animal shelter along the highway.

Like PAWS, ACF relies heavily on social media to raise awareness about animal cruelty in Pakistan. “People see updates on our animal rescue activities and donkey camps and want to help out,” says Chundrigar. And it was through Facebook that Chundrigar teamed up with Zain Mustafa, an architect and die-hard animal lover, who is now a part of ACF’s core team. Many have even shown interest in adopting ACF’s rescued animals. “The encouraging part is that people are positive towards something being done for animals in this country,” she says. And while on the topic of showing compassion towards animals in the country, Mustafa adds, “It can be done by introducing the value of animals into our mainstream education system and curriculum at a very early age…  By getting children to physically interact with a variety of animals and bridge the widening gap between ‘us’ and ‘them’.”

ACF’s second project is also currently in the pipeline. It will aim to provide a therapeutic centre for healing that will focus on conducting individual counseling, art therapy and support groups. “We will be working with sexually and physically abused women, children and transgenders. [The project] will also include education for donkey-cart owners that, I believe, will gradually help change their behaviour towards the animals,” says Chundrigar, who is training to become a certified counselor.

But with limited funding, the ACF can only do so much. Although people have been donating cash and tangibles such as food via the information provided to them on social media, the funds are trickling in slowly. “What we get is enough to manage our current animals’ food and medical treatment,” says Chundrigar, adding that the monthly cost for food and supplies at the shelter is well over Rs100,000 and keeps increasing as the organisation rescues more animals each day. “We still need help starting our new shelter, acquiring ambulances and starting an inner-city emergency unit.”

Even though Chundrigar is positive about the path ahead for ACF, she admits that for Pakistan, animal welfare and charity is something quite “out of the ordinary,” with people often mocking her work. “They said I was crazy to think I could do something for animals because the situation is too far gone. Also, it’s an uphill battle explaining to people why animals deserve love and a chance at having a better life.”

Donation details:

Ayesha Chundrigar Foundation

Iban number: Pk33BAHL1036008100660001

Account number: 10360081006600012

Bank Al Habib, Kh-e-Hafiz Branch, Karachi.

For food donations and volunteering queries, please write to:

ayeshachundrigarfoundation@gmail.com

Sonya Rehman is a writer/journalist based in Lahore. She tweets @sonyarehman

Published in The Express Tribune, Sunday Magazine, June 15th, 2014.

Please Donate if you Can!!

June 27, 2014 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | 3 Comments

Under Obama Over 1,200 Military Dogs Put Down by Regime

Dogs of War Remembered

Emerald Warrior 2011

MoonbatteryEating dogs was bad enough. Killing over 1,200 faithful military dogs who were protecting American troops in Afghanistan is worse:

The heroic service dogs were euthanized because they were deemed too “dangerous” for civilian adoption or jobs with law enforcement agencies, as well as for medical reasons according to U.S. Air Force reports given to Congress.

The dogs were used as guards and to sniff out terrorist bombs.

It’s not as if no homes could be found:

Currently more than 300 people are waiting to adopt a military dog, with an average waiting time of 18 months.

Betraying those who loyally served in Afghanistan and Iraq has been characteristic of the current administration.

Is there anything these people do right?

dog-leading-obama

No wonder Bo is trying to get away from him!!

On a tip from Dragon’s Lair.

*All but ‘1’ of the dogs rescued from Mike Vick’s fighting ring were rehabbed and re-homed without any problems!!  This is horrible and ridiculous!  Everyone of these military K-9’s who served for us deserved better… a home and family to retire to after their service.  And if after the ongoing VA scandal, anyone out there still believes that ‘they’ care any more about our 2-legged veterans than the 4-legged ones… Houston, We have a problem!!

June 23, 2014 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Dogs, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Adoption, Pet and Animal Training, Pets, Political Change, Service and Military Animals, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Working and Military Dogs and Related | 7 Comments

Reality of Dumping Your Dog… A Family Member

Reality of Dumping Your Pets... Pets Are Family

Pets feel the crunch of the economic crisis

Blind Dog Living in a Trash Pile Gets the Most Beautiful Rescue – The End is Amazing

Patrick: Abuser Located and Charged

Elderly Chihuahua rescued from trash

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

Where there is a will…

Economic Forecast: One Million Pets May Lose Homes in the U.S.

Homeless With Pets… Choosing Pets Over Shelter

May 1, 2014 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, animal abuse, Animal Rescues, Dogs, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | 2 Comments

Hayden Law Repeal Bad News for CA Shelter Animals

UPDATE: On April 11 the California Senate budget subcommittee voted unanimously not to repeal certain provisions of the Hayden Law, just as the Assembly budget subcommittee did on March 13.

ilovedogs.com: While this is good news, the provisions could still be repealed. The next step is for the Assembly and Senate budget committees to review the subcommittees’ reports and vote on their versions of the budget bill.

California pet parents should therefore continue to spread the word, sign the petition and let their legislators know how they feel.

sad dog in animal shelterWhen the Hayden Law was passed in 1998, it provided California shelter animals with protections including a holding period of four to six business days.

But now these protections are in danger of disappearing. To save the state what he says is $46 million annually (California currently faces a $9.2 billion deficit), Gov. Jerry Brown is considering repealing provisions of the Hayden Law, which means shelter animals could be euthanized after only 72 hours.

The three-day holding period would apply whether or not the shelter is open for business. As Francis Battista, co-founder of the Best Friends Animal Society, told NBC Los Angeles, “You could go away on Friday, your dog could get out. It’s a long weekend and you don’t get back until Tuesday and by then your dog is dead. Three days is not a long time to reclaim your animal.”

The short holding period could result in less-adoptable pets, like senior dogs or dogs with health issues, being euthanized before they could be given a second chance by a rescue group or potential adopter. The 72-hour timeframe would make it difficult for rescues to arrange saving even young, healthy dogs.

“When we decide to save an animal, people don’t realize the time it takes to get a plan together,” Haze Lynn, founder of Take Me Home Rescue, told NBC Los Angeles. “By killing quickly, we won’t be able to save anybody. This is a big problem for us because we need the time.”

Not only would the repeal reduce the holding period, it would allow shelters to immediately euthanize rabbits, pot-bellied pigs, turtles, hamsters and other pets.

Also eliminated would be the requirement for shelters to provide sick or injured animals with veterinary care; to provide records of their animals; or to post lists of lost and found pets.

Back in 2004, when then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger was considering repealing the same provisions, the public outcry helped influence him to change his mind. Now Brown is facing a similar backlash.

Most animal welfare groups, among them the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), ASPCA, Best Friends Animal Society and Stray Cat Alliance, oppose the repeal.

More than 56,000 people have signed a Change.org petition started by attorney Marla Tauscher that asks Brown not to repeal any provisions of the Hayden Law. The Best Friends Animal Society is organizing a rally in Sacramento tomorrow, March 13, the day state budget subcommittee hearings begin. People are urged to spread awareness of the possible repeal via their social networks.

The law’s creator and namesake, former state Sen. Tom Hayden, appears in a video urging Brown not to repeal his law.

“I wrote the legislation because I learned that 65,000 animals were put to death unnecessarily every year in Los Angeles County, and it was meant to avoid that from ever happening to another stray animal and their family,” he says in the video.

“It’s not a budget issue, because you can solve the problem with penalties or fees. It is a humane issue, and I urge you to look at your dog before you allow this bill which protects animals to die.”

The dog Hayden is referring to is Sutter, Brown’s 8-year-old Pembroke Welsh Corgi, who often accompanies his dog dad to government meetings. Sutter has even sat at the table during budget hearings.

A major argument for not letting the Hayden Law die is that it has actually been suspended since 2009 – meaning that for the past three years, the state has not paid municipal shelters to hold animals beyond 72 hours or provide animals with veterinary care. (Many shelters continue to do so anyway by relying on city or county funds.) Animal advocates say the law should continue to be suspended instead of permanently repealed so that when the economy recovers, the state can start compensating the shelters again.

“Since these requirements are already suspended, the Governor’s repeal proposal is a policy decision, not a budget decision,” said Jennifer Fearing, California’s senior director for the HSUS, in a statement. “And the policy consequences of repeal are likely to be adverse for homeless animals’ prospects – indeed repeal cannot possibly move California forward.”

In defense of the repeal, the Brown administration says that local governments, not the state, should decide on the holding time for shelter animals.

But Taimie L. Bryant, a UCLA law professor who specializes in animal law, disagrees. She told Sutter’s Friends, a Facebook group opposed to the repeal, “The Hayden Law established a few modest provisions that should be in place at the state level as a minimum standard of decent animal sheltering … We need consistency across jurisdictions on basic aspects of animal sheltering.”

There is also a misconception that the state pays shelters to euthanize animals. H.D. Palmer, a spokesman for the California Dept. of Finance, told KABC-TV, “So those local governments who are actually putting down more animals get more money from the state. That seems to be somewhat of a perverse fiscal incentive.”

Social Compassion in Legislation (SCIL), a nonprofit whose mission is to reduce pet overpopulation through legislation, clarifies the reimbursement formula on its website:

“The reimbursement formula does not create a perverse incentive to kill animals. Shelters’ financial incentives are always aligned with saving lives because they can bring in revenues from adoption and owner redemption and will be spared the costs of killing (which are not reimbursed by the state). If they hold and kill, they will only get the small difference in excess of 72 hours reimbursed by the state. They will not get from the state the costs of killing or the foregone money from adoptions and owner redemptions.”

Thanks in part to the Hayden Law, California has been at the forefront of shelter reform across the U.S.

“Once the law is gone, the reference point for other shelters to follow is also gone,” Battista told NBC Los Angeles.

What You Can Do:

  • Help spread awareness of the possible repeal on your social networks. Tell Brown you oppose it on his Facebook and Twitter accounts.
  • Sign the Change.org petition urging Brown not to repeal provisions of the law.
  • Call Brown at 916-445-2841 or send a fax to 916-558-3160.
  • Attend the rally starting at 11:30 a.m. tomorrow, March 13, at the California State Capitol in Sacramento.

PHOTO: Nhandler

April 23, 2014 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization | 1 Comment

Arizona is Being Overrun by Packs of Vicious Wild Chihuahuas… Vicious? Really?

So what the heck is going on in Arizona?  Vicious wild Chihuahuas?  They are Chihuahuas for God sake…  Why didn’t they notice this sooner?  And as for Chihuahuas nipping people, even at kids…  really?  A big deal?  Not so much in my book…  And terrorizing neighborhoods?  Again, really?  A bit of a stretch I’d say, but cops say wild packs of Chihuahuas are causing quite a problem.  So lets all dig in and help out…

Video: Chihuahuas running wild in Maryvale, Arizona  -  The original video was removed…

Animal Control needs public’s help wrangling Chihuahuas running loose in Maryvale

Examiner: Stray chihuahuas are hanging out in miniature packs in various Arizona neighborhoods; chasing and nipping at schoolchildren reports Monday’s abc.news.go.

According to the Maricopa County Animal Care and Control, the little ones have been breeding indiscriminately with each other and now have been overrunning residential areas.

"Part of it is these animals aren’t spayed or neutered, so they’re out looking for a mate and having babies, which also contributes to the problem," stated a representative from Animal Control.

Authorities believe the high number of foreclosures and undocumented workers forced to leave Arizona when the economy crashed, has caused the overpopulation of the small breed.

Sadly, chihuahuas are the most popular breed at the Arizona shelters.

Chihuahuas are the smallest breed of dogs, and named for the state of Chihuahua in Mexico, although some experts argue that the breed originated in China and Little Artie, who weighs only four pounds, is ready for his new home. This little guy loves Cheerios!were brought over by Spanish traders.

The adorable little breed, with varied temperaments and intense loyalties toward their humans, were made popular by Paris Hilton and her famous "chi" named Tinkerbell.

Residents are urged to safely corral the little dogs if at all possible, and then call Animal Control.

While chihuahuas may not be a popular breed in Maricopa County, many city dwellers in New York City find the adorable little ones perfect for apartment living.

As Bob Barker has been repeating for years and years, please spay and neuter your pets.

If you are interested in rescuing and adopting a chihuahua? or fostering? Click here for more information.

Thi featured Chihuahua featured by the Examiner is named Artie; he is available for adoption. Please refer to ID# 14-02-16-00249, but there are many more.

If you would like to continue receiving the latest news on pet issues and how we can help those who cannot speak, please click the "Subscribe" icon.

Follow the National Pet Rescue Examiner on Facebook by clicking here. Please visit and "like" my page. You are welcome to submit story ideas by contacting me at cdhanna9703@aol.com.

If you possibly can, please help by adopting at least one, by donating for others to adopt and by helping to get them spayed and neutered.  There is always room for just one more pet… just one more Chihuahua, they are small… but be prepared, some are feisty.

If everyone that can adopted just one more pet and then acted responsibly, there would be no more homeless pets and no pets euthanized needlessly!! 

JOMP~

February 27, 2014 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Stop Euthenization, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures, Wild Animals | 2 Comments

Pros & Cons of Neutering–Really? There are Cons?

PupHug-FernandaCerioni

Puppies rely on us to make informed decisions. Image Copr. Fernanda Cerioni/Flickr

By Amy Shojai at Amy Shojai’s Bling, Bitches and Blood

Yes, actually, there are and that may surprise you. It did me. After all, we’ve heard from animal welfare advocates for years preaching the gospel of spay/neuter.  Heck, I preached this myself and for the majority of dogs and cats (ESPECIALLY cats!), “the big fix” is the best thing that ever happens to them.

There’s new evidence, though, that for dogs at least the pros and cons are not so black and white. While the University of Georgia’s sample of 40,139 canine death records from the Veterinary Medical Database from 1984-2004 concluded that neutered dogs could be expected to live a year and a half longer (on average) than intact dogs, other studies point out potential increases in hip dysplasia or cancer. Oy.

So what’s a responsible pet parent to do? One possible solution is a new non-surgical sterilization technique called Zeuterin from Ark Sciences, that renders the boy dogs incapable of fathering puppies but let’s them keep about 50 percent of their testosterone that makes a beneficial health difference especially in certain breeds.

Read my newest article of Zeuterin and Pros/Cons of Neutering here. My best recommendation is to find out everything you can, consult with your vet, and only then make an informed decision. What do you think? Go ahead and comment–let ‘er rip! *s*

Amy is so right, spay/neutering is not a cut and dry proposition… no pun intended! JOMP!

Related:

Pet Sterilization Laws Raise Health Concerns

Why I’ve Had a Change of Heart About Neutering Pets 

‘Zeutering’ offers dog sterilization in a ‘shot’ 

An Alternative to Surgery to Sterilize Male Dogs

Spay, Neuter, Adopt – Repeat 

Thousands of Shelter Pets Killed Every Day Yet Half of Americans Uninformed and Unaware

Lucy Pet Foundation’s Rose Parade float promotes pet spay/neuter – Features Daniel

‘Miracle’ dog that survived gassing headed to Rose Parade 

Urinary and Fecal Incontinence in Pets

STOP Los Angeles and Other Major Cities from the Unreasonable Pet Limit Laws and Restrictions

Adopt Just One More Pet and Save a Life!! – Sharing a Great Pet Adoption Pet Story!!

Taking Away More Liberties: WI Pet Ordinance Forces Homeowners to Choose — Your Pet or Your House

Southfield Implements Limit on Cats – Over Reaction!

Pet-Limit Laws Unconstitutional

Massachusetts Town Puts Limits on Cat Ownership

Three Nuns Adopt the Senior Pit Bull Nobody Else Wanted

Should You Adopt a Second Dog?

‘Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Soul Remains Unawakened’ – Join the NO KILL MOVEMENT

Hopeful News: LA City Animal Shelter Deaths Plummet by Nearly Half During First Two Years of Best Friends Animal Society’s NKLA Initiative

February 22, 2014 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Euthenization | 2 Comments

US Olympic skier Gus Kenworthy Saving Dogs of Sochi

One of the many dark tales coming out of Sochi is the revelation that Russian authorities have been executing stray dogs. US Olympic skier Gus Kenworthy plans to do something about it by saving them.

Gus Kenworthy, Olympics, Sochi

American Olympic skier Gus Kenworthy and Russian billionaire Oleg Deripaska are doing their part to save the stray dogs in Sochi

Obviously, people were outraged when they heard about the killings. Oleg Deripaska, one of the wealthiest men in Russia, was so upset by this that he took it upon himself to save as many as he could. He used his fortune to build shelters for the strays in Baranovka, which is near Sochi.

Kenworthy expected to be on his way home with the pups by now but has been delayed by paperwork problems in Russia?!?

Video:  Stray Dogs Saved by Russian Billionaire…

Some of the the dogs are being adopted by Olympics fans and heading to new homes. According to ABC News on Tuesday the process of American fans adopting a dog is being helped by the Humane Society International.

Olympic fans are adopting dogs in Sochi

Outlining all the requirements for moving a dog from one country to another, it seems that finding a local Russian vet is the fastest way to get help in seeing if Fido can come home. Getting all the shots necessary for the pup to leave the country is the first step. Plus a kennel needs to be acquired for the flight of an animal if they are going to be shipped on an airplane. The process of owning a Russian dog might be costly with just the airplane ride being $150 for the canine’s travels to their new home.

Russian billionaire Oleg Deripaska stepped in before the Olympics and opened a mountain refuge for some dogs to hang out, but the issue still isn’t resolved. Fans worry that after the athletes leave the dogs could be left out to roam again or worse.

Offering up assistance to help adopt dogs seems like a logical solution at the moment and if fans are willing to take a new four legged friend home, it might be the perfect answer to helping some of the dogs.

February 18, 2014 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Dogs, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | 2 Comments

BSL and Pit Bulls

What exactly is BSL?

bsl-is-wack My Pit Bull Friend: BSL is an abbreviation for Breed Specific Legislation. Not only is this Legislation targeting specific breeds of dog, but dogs that appear to have characteristics of certain breeds. Your dogs may not even be close to what is on the ban list but may be affected negatively nonetheless. In Iowa, a Pit Bull is defined as “any dog that is an American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, or any dog displaying the majority of physical traits of any one or more of the above breeds (more so than any other breed), or any dog exhibiting those distinguishing characteristics.”

Pit Bull type breeds are included in every single breed restriction or ban that has been set in place by each region that has implemented a legislation, every single one! This ban affects dogs all around the world. These bans and restrictions around the world vary from region to region but the effect that it’s having on these dogs is very real.

The following are some of the legislation requirements that you must follow depending upon the region your are in:

Must not own, sell, harbor, breed, keep a Pit Bull type dog.
Leash and or muzzle your dog when in public.
Must be 21 years of age or older
Post “Beware of Dog” signs around your residence.
Procure $100,000 US in liability insurance.
Spay/neuter the dog.
Must surrender the dog to be euthanized if it has bitten a person or animal.

Everyday, Pit Bulls are being killed due to legislation. In the areas where these dogs are illegal to have, there are many people that have no choice but to relocate their dogs within a certain time frame or give them up where they eventually are killed. Since it is already hard as it is to relocate Pit Bulls, the rise in deaths has grown drastically. These are dogs that have never harmed a thing in their lives and are gentle and loving and are being forced out of their homes to suffer an unjustifiable death with no where to go but shelters where they are put down. It’s a Holocaust of sorts and is completely unfair to loving dogs and owners alike, who both feel the impact.

The ban affects home owners and renters alike because insurance companies see these breeds as a liability and will not allow them on their properties, making finding a residence extremely hard for owners that do not wish to give up their dogs.

There is a fear of these breeds now and this causes people to cast judgment solely based upon a false sense of fear. The truth is that dogs sometimes attack people,, not just a specific breed or breeds, but the species as a whole. By banning and killing off dogs solely based off of appearance, we are endorsing and showing that stereotyping is okay and should be enforced. It is showing that every dog that looks a certain way is exactly the same. This is so wrong on so many levels. Instead of killing off dogs that belong to a responsible owner why not punish owners who are irresponsible. Why should the actions of the few affect the masses so dramatically?

Banning these breeds, instead of implementing new laws that target irresponsible owners and dogs that actually are dangerous, is not working. These dogs are now being bred by people who just want to make a profit based on their desirability, who in fact, are worsening the breeds. These dogs are being bred in mills and with no concern for good temperaments, genes, and health problems, which is causing more stereotyping to happen. What should be done instead of banning the breeds, is enforcing proper breeding practices and responsible dog ownership.

The fight to end BSL is one that will take the efforts of every person that cares about these dogs. If we don’t stand up for them no one will and then what? Let them die, suffer, and soon be banned everywhere causing the extinction of many breeds? Ending BSL starts with you. Educating yourself and others and being a responsible dog owner is just the beginning to a long road of changing the view about Pit Bulls and Pit Bull type breed.

So will you join in on the fight? 

Three Nuns Adopt the Senior Pit Bull Nobody Else Wanted 

Severely beaten dog found in Columbus is dead 

Pit Bulls Bring Out Fear, Love and Loathing 

The Face of Dogfighting: One Dog’s Incredible Journey 

American Pit Bull Terrier Dogs… In Memory of Ace

February 11, 2014 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization | 3 Comments

Hopeful News: LA City Animal Shelter Deaths Plummet by Nearly Half During First Two Years of Best Friends Animal Society’s NKLA Initiative

“Lives are at stake.  Not only is this program important for Los Angeles, but we are laying a path forward for other cities to follow [in] making no-kill an achievable goal,”  says Batista

Digital Journal: Success of coalition approach to ending the killing of healthy animals in shelters provides road map for cities across the nation. The number of healthy or treatable dogs and cats killed in Los Angeles city animal shelters has been cut nearly in half in just two years, Best Friends Animal Society announced today.

We Are All Waiting...

Save All of Them!!!

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) February 06, 2014 – Cross Posted at Digital Journal, AskMarion and Just One More Pet (JOMP)

Statistics provided by LA Animal Services show that since the formation in 2012 of a 70-organization coalition led by Best Friends Animal Society, shelter deaths have dropped 48 percent. In 2011, the year before Best Friends launched its NKLA (No-Kill Los Angeles) initiative with the City of Los Angeles, approximately 17,400 healthy, treatable dogs and cats were killed in LA shelters. One year later, the number was reduced to approximately 13,400. In 2013, the number decreased further to 9,075.

“We’ve reached an incredible lifesaving milestone for shelter pets and animal lovers in Los Angeles,” says Francis Battista, a co-founder of Best Friends Animal Society, the Utah-based organization who worked closely with the city to form the partnership. “There’s no doubt we are on the right track to reach a day when animals are no longer killed in LA shelters simply because they don’t have a safe place to call home.”

Best Friends’ NKLA initiative, which is built around a partnership with the City of Los Angeles, began in January of 2012, with the goal of ending the killing of healthy and treatable pets in LA shelters by 2017. The approach provides economically targeted spay/neuter services so fewer animals enter shelters, as well as adoption incentives and promotions to ensure that more animals exit the shelters alive.

Brenda Barnette, general manager of LA Animal Services, says the partnership and resulting coalition has paid big dividends.

“The unique public-private partnership of Best Friends Animal Society and Los Angeles Animal Services has enabled us to make life-saving strides for the animals in Los Angeles,” says Barnette. “When NKLA launched two years ago we had no idea that we would exceed our goals to reduce shelter deaths and increase live outcomes for our animals so significantly.”

The number of animals killed each year in shelters around the country is around four million -approximately 9,000 every day. Best Friends, which has introduced “Save Them All” as its national call-to-action, is working with no-kill advocates across the country to bring that number down to zero.

Coalition provides replicable model for other cities

Several key factors make these kinds of strides possible in a city the size of Los Angeles.

“The main driver is that the entire coalition works toward the same goal,” says Battista. “From the beginning we knew we had to accomplish something uncommon in animal welfare: bring a large number of local groups to affiliate with a campaign in a major U.S. city. At first it wasn’t easy, but two years into it our local coalition has grown and is pulling in the same life-saving direction. Clearly, we couldn’t have done this on our own, without all the groups working together.”

Best Friends regards Los Angeles as both a trendsetter and a representative proving ground, suggesting that this type of program can be replicated in other cities around the country.

The coalition focuses on two key areas – promoting adoption as the best way for Los Angeles residents to get their pets, and making it much easier for low-income pet owners to have their pets spayed or neutered through the delivery of free or low-cost services into communities with little or no access to veterinary care.

“By establishing programs for low-income pet owners we are reaching an underserved group of animal lovers who have few resources to care for their pets,” says Battista. “We’re tweaking things as we progress to ensure that we’re making the greatest impact on the problem. The coalition is gathering momentum, and the NKLA campaign is generating more and more popular support.”

Two LA facilities boost adoption of shelter animals

Best Friends operates two dedicated facilities to increase adoptions of city shelter animals. The Best Friends Pet Adoption and Spay/Neuter Center in Mission Hills is run out of a city-owned facility and only offers for adoption shelter dogs and cats from any of the six Los Angeles shelters. The NKLA Pet Adoption Center in West Los Angeles, operated by Best Friends through a foundation grant, features homeless LA pets for adoption from a variety of coalition partners. Total adoptions from both centers numbered approximately 3,800 dogs and cats in 2013.

The Mission Hills center clinic performed more than 6,200 spay/neuter surgeries, over 3,000 of which were reserved for pets of low-income families.

Best Friends also employs special pet transports to save LA shelter animals. During the past two years several thousand LA Animal Services dogs and cats were delivered to guaranteed adoption rescue partners across the country, while more than 1,700 neonatal kittens and dozens of nursing mothers were saved though an on-site kitten nursery in Mission Hills. Additionally, the lives of hundreds of neonatal puppies and several nursing mothers were saved through a foster network.

Battista says that while Best Friends and its partners are on track to meet the goal of taking the city to no-kill by 2017, there are no plans to take the collective foot off the pedal.

“Lives are at stake,” Battista says, “so every day, the efforts of our LA team are focused on working with our coalition partners to stop the killing in shelters. Not only is this program important for Los Angeles, but we are laying a path for other large cities to follow and making no-kill an achievable goal for cities and towns across the United States.”

About Best Friends Animal Society®
Best Friends Animal Society is the only national animal welfare organization focused exclusively on ending the killing of dogs and cats in America’s shelters. An authority and leader in the no-kill movement since its founding in 1984, Best Friends runs the nation’s largest no-kill sanctuary for companion animals, as well as life-saving programs in partnership with rescue groups and shelters across the country. Since its founding, Best Friends has helped reduce the number of animals killed in shelters from 17 million per year to about 4 million. Best Friends has the knowledge, technical expertise and on-the-ground network to end the killing and Save Them All®.

To like Best Friends Animal Society on Facebook go to: http://www.facebook.com/bestfriendsanimalsociety

Follow Best Friends on Twitter: http://twitter.com/bestfriends

Related: 

Spay, Neuter, Adopt – Repeat

Thousands of Shelter Pets Killed Every Day Yet Half of Americans Uninformed and Unaware

Lucy Pet Foundation’s Rose Parade float promotes pet spay/neuter – Features Daniel

‘Miracle’ dog that survived gassing headed to Rose Parade

Why I’ve Had a Change of Heart About Neutering Pets

Pet Sterilization Laws Raise Health Concerns

STOP Los Angeles and Other Major Cities from the Unreasonable Pet Limit Laws and Restrictions

Adopt Just One More Pet and Save a Life!! – Sharing a Great Pet Adoption Pet Story!!

Taking Away More Liberties: WI Pet Ordinance Forces Homeowners to Choose — Your Pet or Your House

Southfield Implements Limit on Cats – Over Reaction!

Pet-Limit Laws Unconstitutional

Massachusetts Town Puts Limits on Cat Ownership

Three Nuns Adopt the Senior Pit Bull Nobody Else Wanted

Should You Adopt a Second Dog?

‘Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Soul Remains Unawakened’ – Join the NO KILL MOVEMENT

February 8, 2014 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | 4 Comments

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 241 other followers