JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Is your pet prepared for disaster?

Survival Life:

When it comes to preparing for a disaster you need to make sure that you prepare not only for yourself and your family, but also for your pets. A 2012 study from the Humane Society shows that 33% of all US households own at least one cat. It also shows that 39% own at least one dog. To some people a pet may just be an animal but to many, Fido and Fluffy are extensions of the family. With this being the case it is fairly surprising to me how few preppers remember to pack an emergency kit for their pets.

I have heard too often that pets will be able to “make their own way” and that it is their natural instinct to survive. The truth of the matter is, most house trained cats and dogs don’t make it very far on their own. The average life span of a stray animal is cut nearly in half compared to that of a house kept pet. With that being said I urge any of you with pets to make sure that you consider them when making your preparations.

If you believe bringing your pet with you during an evacuation is not an option, there are other solutions for you.

  • Contact your veterinarian and ask for a list of their preferred boarding facilities.
  • Ask your local animal shelter if they provide emergency shelter for pets.
  • Ask trusted sources outside your immediate area if they would be willing to take in your pet.

Emergency Supplies and Traveling Kits
If you do plan on taking your pet with you, it is very important to create a Pet Evacuation Kit or PEK handy for your pets. This kit is not unlike your own Bug Out Bag and will contain all of the same basic ingredients. Keep this PEK with your personal go bags and make sure that everyone in the family knows where they are. This kit should be clearly marked and easy to carry. Items to consider keeping in or near your pack include:

  • Pet first-aid kit and guide book (ask your vet what to include, or purchase one online)
  • 3-7 days’ worth of canned (pop-top) or dry food (make sure that you follow the first in first out rule with pet food as well as human food)
  • Disposable litter trays (aluminum roasting pans work well, are inexpensive and usually come with lids to keep the smell down)
  • Litter
  • Liquid dish soap and disinfectant
  • Disposable garbage bags for clean-up
  • Pet feeding dishes
  • Extra collar or harness as well as an extra leash
  • Photocopies of medical records and a waterproof container with a two-week supply of any medicine your pet requires. Medications should also be rotated out the same as food to avoid having ineffective or bad medication when your pet needs it
  • Bottled water, at least 3 days’ worth for each person and pet
  • A traveling bag, crate or sturdy carrier, ideally one for each pet (folding crates and carriers work well and they will stow away in a tight area when not in use)
  • Blanket (for scooping up a fearful pet)
  • Recent photos of your pets (in case you need to make “Lost” posters)

Choosing a “Designated Caregiver”
This step will take considerable time and thought. When choosing a temporary caregiver, consider someone who lives close to your residence but still far enough away that they would be outside of any immediate danger zone. This should be someone who you have a great amount of trust in and it should be a reciprocal relationship.

Be sure to discuss your expectations at length with a permanent caregiver, so he or she understands the responsibility of caring for your pet. They will need to have met your pet and you need to make sure that your pet is comfortable around them. If you are willing and able to rely on them they should be able to do the same for you if the situation is reversed.

Step 5 Evacuation Preparation
If you must evacuate your home in a crisis, plan for the worst-case scenario. Never assume that you will return in a few hours. If you think you may be gone for only a day, prepare for the possibility that you may not be able to return for several weeks.

When recommendations for evacuation have been announced or a mandatory evacuation order has been declared, follow the instructions of local and state officials. Below are a few simple steps that will help to minimize your evacuation time.

  • Store an emergency kit and leashes as close to an exit as possible.
  • Make sure all pets wear collars and tags with up-to-date identification. Your pet’s ID tag should contain his or her name, your telephone number, and any urgent medical needs.
  • The ASPCA recommends microchipping your pet as a more permanent form of identification. A microchip is implanted in the animal’s shoulder area, and can be read by scanner at most animal shelters and will contain all of your contact information.
  • Always bring pets indoors at the first sign or warning of a storm or disaster. Pets can become disoriented or frightened and wander away from home during a crisis.
  • Consider your evacuation route and call ahead to make arrangements for boarding your pet outside of the danger zone at the first sign of an impending disaster.

Geographic and Climatic Considerations
Do you live in an area that is prone to certain natural catastrophes, such as tornadoes, earthquakes or floods? If so, be sure to create your evacuation plan accordingly.

  • Determine well in advance which rooms offer safe havens in your home. These rooms should be clear of hazards such as windows, flying debris, etc.
  • Easy-to-clean areas such as utility rooms, bathrooms, and basements typically work exceptionally well as safe zones.
  • A supply of fresh water is particularly important. In areas that may lose electricity, fill up bathtubs and sinks ahead of time to ensure that you have access to water during the first stage of any crisis
  • In the event of flooding, go to the highest location in your home, but make sure that you still have some sort of an escape route from that room.

If emergency officials recommend that you stay in your home, it’s crucial that you keep your pets with you. Keep your PEK pack and other supplies close at hand. Your pets may become stressed and anxious during the in-house confinement, if so you should consider crating them for both your and their safety and comfort.

FEMA: Include Pets in Your Preparedness Plan

Make sure the pets are safe during storms

Hurricane Season’s Here: Six Steps to A Rescue Plan that Includes Pets

N.J. pets welcome at hurricane evacuation shelters

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September 26, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Travel, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Travel Fun With Dogs

Trips with your pets can be fun, challenging or awful and often which of those options ends up being the case depends on you and your attitude and expectations.

We have a little pack of 4, making the sheer number a possible problem in itself… if you let it. One of our 4 suffers from ADHD… Yes you read that right, dogs can have ADHD and they pretty much have the same symptoms that kids with ADHD have.  We have another one that suffers with pancreatitis. And we also have one who fights fairly severe car sickness and often loses the fight.

But, we choose to see travel with our pets as an adventure and a part of the package of having pets; just like we did when we had younger kids.  Therefore whatever challenges, unexpected events or situations come up, we see them as part of life; part of our life. Whenever you travel with a family, whatever the make-up there will be surprises, challenges and issues, but there will also be joy, fun and laughter.

We have made major moves and taken trips large and small trips with them and we generally take our gang along whenever we can.  When we absolutely can’t, we leave them at home with a pet sitter or we take them and get a pet sitter for the hotel.

Through our life we have had birds, turtles and pocket pets that have also traveled or moved with us at times.

Dad... We Are Ready To Go On!

Sundance Recreation Area

P1010022

Iowa Corn Field

Fun Side Stop in MO

Side Trip to a Lake in Missouri

Dad and Apachi Found a FishLet's Go In Says Apachi

Exploring is so much fun!

Exploring

Stops are always good!

P1010017

 

 

P1010003Especially Gas and snack stops

YeeHa... Says Princess... We Have Arrived In Texas

Yeeha… Time to Howl!  We’ve Arrived

We Want To Help 2

Why Can’t We Help Unload??

The best advice we a can give you is anticipate and prepare, but expect the unexpected and don’t over-react or get upset.  Make it all part of the experience and adventure and then it won’t seem so bad.  I am a writer/blogger so I look at it as future material. But we all send emails, write letters or tell stories… so look at it as future material!!

Go Pet Friendly – Road Trip Planner

 

Related:

Traveling With Dogs, Glorious Italy

September 18, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pet Travel, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Rosie’s Dog Beach in Belmont Shore (Long Beach) Video

VIDEO: Chris Miller & dogs at Rosie’s Dog Beach | Photos by Justin Rudd!

Rosie’s Dog Beach in Belmont Shore (Long Beach) is the only off-leash area for dogs on the beach is Los Angeles County. 


dog beach long beach california los angeles county off leash
ROSIE’S DOG BEACH in Long Beach permits off-leash beach access for dogs and their owners in a 3-acre area, daily from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. The area, named after the English Bulldog that inspired its creation, is at 4800 E. Ocean Blvd., basically between Roycroft and Argonne avenues at the water in Belmont Shore, 90803. THE LAW: ONE DOG PER ADULT. CLICK HERE for a Rosie’s Dog Beach map, driving directions, rules, photos and more details.

 

n/t to Haute Dogs and Justin Rudd

Related:

Dangers of Dog Parks and Other Springtime Tips…

April 26, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, On The Lighter Side, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pet Travel, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Success Stories | , , , , | 1 Comment

New Luxury Resort for VIPS (Very Important Pets) Opens at Disney World

Planning a trip to Walt Disney World, but think it’s “Goofy” to leave your dog behind? No problem – make a reservation for your pooch at the brand-new Best Friends Pet Care luxury resort. But you’d better hurry: The Los Angeles Times reports that all the VIP suites are sold out until January, and other accommodations are going fast for the holiday season.

The resort, which opened last month over Labor Day weekend, can accommodate 300 pets for either daytime or overnight boarding. Among its amenities are a water park (like the Bora Bora Club in Southern California, no humans are allowed), a walking path around natural wetlands, and a 25,000-square-foot dog park. It also has a grooming salon that provides baths for guests before they’re sent home with their dogparents, and two large “camp rooms” for play group and doggie day camp.

“Our pet guests can enjoy luxurious accommodations and a variety of different play areas here at Best Friends Pet Care Resort,” Phil Bernard, vice president of Operating Participants for Walt Disney Parks & Resorts, said on opening day. “Where else can vacationing dogs have their own water play park or bedtime stories?”

Those luxurious accommodations Bernard spoke of are four 226-square-foot VIP (Very Important Pet) suites that have TVs, raised bedding and private outdoor yards. For pets requiring a little less pampering, there are climate-controlled, 32-square-foot indoor suites with outdoor patios. All suites are cleaned and disinfected daily.

You can also choose from a wide range of “a la carte” activities and upgrades to purchase for your pooch, such as one-on-one playtime, cuddle time and bedtime stories with staff, ice cream treats and orthopedic bedding.

4(paws)-1-1: Best Friends Pet Care at Walt Disney World is located across from Disney’s Port Orleans Resort, at 2510 Bonnet Creek Parkway in Lake Buena Vista, Fla.; phone 877-493-9738. Day care rates for dogs range from $16 to $46 for up to six hours. Overnight boarding starts at $37 for indoor suites, up to $79 for VIP suites. There is a discount if you are staying at a Disney resort. Whether your pooch is spending the day or night, be sure to bring or fax written proof from your vet that all his vaccinations are up to date.

PHOTOS: Best Friends Pet Care

Posted by Laura Goldman on October 7, 2010

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January 25, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, pet fun, Pet Travel, Pets, responsible pet ownership | 2 Comments

Left Your Pet at Home? More Hotels Offer Them

"Ms. Hansen, your fish are waiting in your room and will be happy to see you," a front-desk employee at Chicago’s Hotel Burnham told me last month as he handed over my room key. Burnham is one of 23 Kimpton Hotel properties participating in the chain’s Guppy Love program. New York City’s SoHo Grand Hotel likewise lets travelers choose whether to share their room with some of its "goldfish team members."

These days, the coziest hotel trend has nothing to do with plush mattresses or comfy slippers. It’s about catering to guests who had to leave their furry, feathered or finned family members at home. This spring the Fairmont in Sonoma, Calif., added a dog to its staff, a chocolate Labrador named Zeus who is tasked with such things as welcoming guests in the lobby and going on hikes with them — or what is referred to, in corporate jargon, as "interactive guest appreciation."(See pictures of presidential First Dogs.)

Unlike traveling with your own pet, hotel-centric critters offer low-level commitment — at Kimpton properties, the staff will clean the bowl and feed the fish for you — while still cozying up your room so it feels more like home. Research has shown that simply petting a dog can reduce levels of the stress hormone cortisol, and psychologists have long posited that the sight of fish swimming in a tank or bowl has a similarly calming effect. (Case in point: I relocated my fish to the windowsill so they could get a better view of Chicago’s architecture, and I of them.)

From Kenya to Canada, resident pets are upping hotels’ friendliness factor. Catie Copley, a black Labrador at the Fairmont Copley Plaza in Boston, is so popular with guests that they can sign up via e-mail (Catie has her own address) in advance of their stay to take her on walks around town. "She definitely gets booked up," says Suzanne Wenz, who handles the hotel’s public relations.(See photos of a real-life hotel for dogs in Australia.)

Meanwhile, Bachelor, a yellow Labrador at the Ritz-Carlton in Beaver Creek, Colo., is available for hiking and snowshoeing excursions as part of the hotel’s Loan-A-Lab program. He has even been incorporated into wedding ceremonies and proposals. The hotel gets its dogs from Colorado shelters, and although guests don’t have to pay to book some quality canine time, they are asked to make a donation to a local animal shelter. "We feel like we’re giving back," Parool Shah, the hotel’s p.r. director, says of the dogs. "We want to ensure that we give them a great life and a great purpose."

Out of concern for guests with pet allergies, hotels don’t allow staff dogs to enter their bars or restaurants. The same rule applies for the one luxury hotel I found — New York’s Algonquin — that has a resident cat. In addition to welcoming guests, Matilda’s official mission, according to her Facebook page, is "to nap in every corner of the hotel’s historic lobby." Nice work if you can get it.

Zeus joined the staff at the Fairmont in Sonoma, Calif., as the hotel’s canine ambassador

Caren Alpert Photography / Fairmont Sonoma Inn and Resort

Time Magazine Online

Cross-Posted:  Just One More Pet

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Suggested Books on Pet Travel:

No Pet Left Behind: The Sherpa Guide for Traveling with Your Best Friend

The Dog Lover’s Companion to California: The Inside Scoop on Where to Take Your Dog (Dog Lover’s Companion Guides)

Travels with Max: How My Dog Unleashed My Life

December 14, 2010 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Travel, Pets | 4 Comments

With Pets Travel Series – 4 Ways To Remember Your Pet While Traveling If You Can’t Take Them Along – Part V

Tobi prancing on the beach

Leaving your pet behind can be the most heartbreaking part of a trip.

A few days before embarking on our two month trip to Southeast Asia, Karen and I watched as we packed our dog, Tobi, into the back of Karen’s parent’s station wagon. They would be taking care of her while we were gone.

In the two years we’d had Tobi, she had rarely been out of our presence. It was as traumatic a separation for her as it was for us.

I’m sure other pet owners know the exact same feeling when you’re about to embark on a journey.

But we tried to remain strong as Tobi gave us a pleading look from behind the rear window glass. We waved as they car pulled away from the curb, and faded into the distance. Karen’s eyes were already wet with tears.

It’s only two months, I told her. Though I’m sure other pet owners know the exact same feeling when you’re about to embark on a journey (sometimes for only a few days). Taking your pet with you is sometimes impractical; and so the absence is unavoidable.  Taking them along is great if you can spend time with them and if there are not quarantine situations involved.

Here are 4 tips to keep their memory close at hand and to make the separation easier.

1. Bring a wallet-sized flipbook

As a pre-trip present to Karen, I surprised her with a flipbook of our dog Tobi. It was pretty much the “best of” from the day we picked her up as a puppy, all the way to a week earlier at the beach.

She loved it. And of course, started crying in anticipation of the moments overseas, in some lonely train station or dirty hostel, that we’d pull out the flipbook and celebrate Tobi.

Turns out we also showed the flipbook to pretty much anyone who even hinted at asking if we had any pets back home. Everyone seemed to think our dog was the “cutest dog ever” but then again, they would probably say that to any owners.

2. Shoot and store a video clip on your camera

Before leaving, I briefly considered this option, perhaps shooting a clip of Tobi prancing along the beach or hanging out in the living room.

But at the time, video clips used up storage space on your memory card, possibly limiting the shots you can take on your trip. Also, viewing the clip would use precious battery power.

Now, with memory cards a fraction of the price they were a year ago, storage space isn’t much of any issue. Plus, if you bring an extra battery or extra memory card, you’ll be okay. (In fact, in today’s newest age of cell phones you can probably just store your movie on your cell phone.)

And there’s nothing quite as heart-warming as your pet wagging their tail in glorious 15 frames per second.

3. Set up a pet webcam

spying on your dog via skype webcamLee LeFever, over at TWINF, told me about his own ingenious solution for checking in on their dog while on their round the world trip.

“We hooked up a web cam pointed to his bed when we were gone. We used Skype 2.0 with it set to auto-answer. Whenever we had a connection, we could pull up Skype and get a little window into Amos’ world in real time.”

“Only one person at a time can use it, so we can’t expose the feed. We can even hear sound along with the video and if there were speakers, we could talk to him, but we figure that might drive him crazy.”

Brilliant. You can read how to set up your own here.

Finally, you could just be creepy and…

4. Gather some pet hair in a plastic bag

For those pet lovers that are extra attached to their pet, you can always physically bring some pet hair with you on the trip.

Creepy? A little.

But I suppose some people still pack a rabbit’s foot for good luck. A tuft of pet hair has got to be the less cruel alternative. I know every time I vacuum our apartment, I find enough shedded hair to put together a whole other dog.

Of course, voodoo pets aren’t for everyone.

So feel free to pick the method of remembering your pet that’s right for you, and don’t be shy in whipping out your memorabilia when a fellow traveler inquires.

Any other ideas or tips for remembering your pet on the road?

By:  Ian MacKenzie – Brave New Traveler

P.S.  The better you feel about where your pet is staying and who is watching them, the easier it is to leave them behind.  Whether they are human kids or furry and feathered kids, it is hard to leave them behind!! Ask Marion/JOMP

Posted:  Just One More Pet

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September 30, 2009 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Travel, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

With Pets Travel Series -10 Tips For Bringing Your Pet Overseas – Part IV

When my husband and I adopted our two puppies (Molly and Jack) everyone told us that would be the end of our carefree travel days.   This summer we will be flying to Madrid and living in apartment in the Chamberi area for three months.  Our two dogs?  They’re coming with us.

Here are the top ten tips, if you want to take your furry buddy overseas:

1.  Plan ahead. Some countries like the UK require special tests 4 months before you arrive.  This site, www.pettravel.com lists the entry requirements by country.

2.  What’s in a breed? If you have a pug or other short nosed breed, many airlines will not allow them due to increased difficulties breathing on the plane.  Sorry, that’s the rule.

3.  Check or Carry? Determine if you are going to check your pet as cargo or bring them on the flight with you.  If your pet is less than 25 lbs, it’s up to you.  If your pet is over 25 lbs then they must be checked in the cargo area.  Doesn’t count against your luggage total—thankfully! Take weather and time of year and time you are flying into consideration.  (Domestically checkout the new Pet Only Airlines and Internationally checkout some of other transport services.)

4.  Call ahead. Some airlines require you to call and make a reservation for your pet; others do not, to avoid confusion call ahead and find out their policy.

5.  Calculate total cost. In our case, the cheapest flight at $2000 roundtrip charged a whopping $1600 in fees for our dogs (Total: $3200).  A more expensive flight at $2500 roundtrip was with an airline that only charged $200 for the dogs (Total: $2700).  Note: Go non-stop if you can.

6.  Make sure Fido Fits.  When buying a pet carrier we brought our dogs with us into PetSmart and had them test out sizes.  Your pet should be able to stand up, turn around and lay down comfortably.  Note: The carrier label should say “Airline Approved”.

7.  Get your shots.  For most of Europe, you just need to have a USDA certified vet fill out a form stating your pet has the appropriate rabies shots.

8.  Forget sleeping pills.  While you may want to pass out with some Ambient on the flight over, don’t do your pet the same favor.  Any type of tranquillizer is discouraged as they can make it difficult for your pet to breath in the pressurized cabin.

9.  Food and Drink.  Don’t forget to tape food and a water bowl to the top of your carrier if you are checking your pet into cargo.

10.  THIS SIDE UP.  Be sure to label your carrier with lots of warnings and all needed information including your contact information in case you get separated.  Have contact info on carrier and pet.  (If your pet is micro-chipped make sure it is the correct type.)

By Christine Gilbert – 04/27/08

Posted:  Just One More Pet

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September 29, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Travel, Pets | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

With Pets Travel Series: Ten Tips for Traveling with Pets Part III

Although bringing your pet when you travel may seem impossible, in most cases it’s surprisingly easy as long as you plan ahead. Please read these ten tips to help get going. Your dog (or cat) will thank you.

10. Check your destination country’s pet health requirements several months in advance.

Every country has its own requirements regarding required health vaccinations, inspections upon arrival, and, sometimes, quarantine. It’s important that you know exactly what the requirements are several months in advance. For example, certain countries specify that your pet must have a rabies vaccination less than a year old but at but no less than 30 days from date of flight. Don’t get stuck having to change your ticket. Prepare for all of the requirements before you go by calling the consulates of the countries you’ll be visiting and asking about their requirements or checking USDA website here.. If you’re going to be traveling between two or more countries without returning to your home country, you may want to locate a vet in the areas where you’ll be staying so that a new pet health certificate can be completed if necessary.

9. Make sure your pet has a clean bill of health.

Regardless of the destination, most travel into another country will require that you present a pet health certificate to confirm that your pet’s vaccinations are up to date. There are typically strict requirements that establish how far in advance of your trip the certificate needs to be completed—usually no more than 5 to 10 days before your departure.

8. Check your carrier’s regulations.

Almost all airlines, trains, and buses have specific regulations that apply to pets on the go, and those regulations can vary greatly from one carrier to another. Check online or call the carrier to ask about pet regulations. Some of the questions to ask include: How many pets can be on-board at once? What are the boarding requirements? What are the pet carrier or crating requirements? Do you need to show up at the airport earlier if you’re traveling with your pet?


7. Prepare your pet’s carrier.

First, make sure that your pet’s carrier fits the transportation provider’s requirements for size, type (hard side vs. soft side), and interior (lined vs. not lined). If it’s allowed in the cabin, make sure that the pet can fit in the carrier comfortably and still fit under the seat. If you’ll be traveling by air, ask for an aisle seat; middle seats are typically storage sites for electronic equipment, and it’s unlikely a carrier will fit well under that seat. Make sure that your pet’s leash and some plastic bags, paper towels, and handwipes are stored in or near the carrier for quick access if needed.

6. Prepare for security screening.

Most U.S. airports require that you remove your pet (if it is a dog or cat) from its carrier and place it in your arms while passing through the security checkpoint. If your pet is unaccustomed to loud noises, you may want to practice a few times before arriving at the airport by exposing your pet to some high traffic places so he or she won’t be scared or startled.

5. Make sure your pet has ID.

Even if you don’t tag your luggage, make sure you tag your pet’s crate or carrier, whether in the cabin or in cargo, and make sure your pet is wearing a tag on its collar with its name and your contact information.

4. Carry contact information.

Note your pet’s health information and vet contact information among your documents. This seems simple, but lots of people forget to take their vet’s contact information with them. Your home vet can be a great resource while abroad, though, so don’t forget!

3. Check the pets-welcome policy for your lodgings

Increasingly, non-pet friendly lodgings are cracking down on enforcement, some charging a “heavy cleaning” or “convenience fee”—in many cases non-refundable—if they discover that you have a pet. Be sure to ask about the pet policy for the places where you plan to stay. Check out www.petswelcome.com for a list of places around the world that are pet friendly.

2. Get to know your pet’s travel needs.

If you’ve never traveled with your pet before, you may be surprised to see how different he or she is on the road. After your first trip, you’ll begin to get an idea of your pet’s specific needs and plan for them accordingly. If you have a dog, be sure to walk it before arriving at the airport. Keep a few plastic bags in your bag for disposal of waste.

1. Last call checklist:

Check your bags once more before you go: Leash? Meds (if liquids, are they stored appropriately)? Food? Water? Water/Food Bowls? Vet record? Blankets? Toy? and Contact Information?

Julie Schwietert Collazo – Matador & Boston.com

Posted:  Just One More Pet

September 28, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Travel, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Dog Friendly Honda Element – Gotta Get One – Updated

Dog-friendly Honda Element Concept Transforms SUV into Pet-hauling Champ

New dog transportation features turn Element into the alpha dog of pet travel

TORRANCE, Calif., U.S.A., April 8, 2009 – New dog-friendly transportation concepts designed for the Honda Element add canine-specific enhancements to one of the most dog-friendly vehicles available, American Honda Motor Co., Inc., announced at the New York International Auto Show.

Peterized Honda Element

The Dog Friendly Honda Element Concept debuted at the 2009 New York International Auto Show on April 8, 2009.

Developed specifically for the Element, the Dog Friendly™ components demonstrate the potential for a dedicated pet restraint system designed to meet the needs of dog owners. A finalized version of the Dog Friendly Element is scheduled to debut this fall. Major components will likely include:

·
a cushioned pet bed in the cargo area with an elevated platform;

·
second row and cargo area pet restraint systems;

·
an extendable cargo area load-in ramp;

·
a 12V DC rear ventilation fan;

·
second-row seat covers with a dog pattern design (matches the bed fabric);

·
all-season rubber floor mats with a toy bone pattern;

·
a spill-resistant water bowl; and

·
Dog Friendly exterior emblems.

“In an interesting turn of events, cars are now chasing dogs,” said John Mendel, executive vice president of American Honda. “Factory integration of a cushioned pet bed, restraint systems and other components is intended to transform the Element into the ultimate dog car.”

The Dog Friendly equipment, engineered specifically for the Element, is designed to accommodate the transportation of dogs in the second-row passenger seats or in the cargo area. The restraint system concepts were designed and fabricated by Takata Corporation, one of the world’s leading automotive safety systems suppliers, exclusively for display on the Dog Friendly Honda Element concept vehicle. The restraint concepts are intended to complement the potential of the vehicle’s existing restraint systems by helping to protect the dog and helping to prevent injuries to other vehicle occupants due to an unrestrained dog impacting them in a collision. For convenience, a ramp is included to help dogs access the rear cargo area. The ramp stores underneath the bed platform and can be conveniently accessed when the rear tailgate is down.

“In-vehicle pet restraints should be part of every dog owner’s safe travel practices,” said Wayne Pacelle, President and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States. “The expanded availability of manufacturer-based restraints and features can help elevate pet comfort and convenience for owners. Good ventilation and access to water on longer trips should also be primary concerns.”

The Element has long been recognized for its dog-friendly interior with an easy-to-clean urethane floor and expansive, flat cargo area (up to 74.6 cu-ft. with rear seats removed), wide-opening side cargo doors, low lift-in height, and accommodating dimensions for tall items. The consumer pet travel advice Web site, Dogcars.com, honored the 2007 Honda Element with its first-ever “Dog Car of the Year” award.

According to the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association, Inc., 39 percent of all households own at least one dog with an estimated total U.S. dog population of 74.8 million. All pet purchases and related products and services comprise an estimated total market value of more than $43 billion (2008 est.).
Substantially restyled for the 2009 model year and available with new features, the Honda Element builds on its spacious and versatile SUV character with a more chiseled exterior appearance and a refreshed interior design. Three unique Element styles are available that range from the rugged and simple Element LX, to the more refined Element EX, to the sporty Element SC.

Powered by a 2.4-liter i-VTEC® 4-cylinder engine, the Element is available with either a 5-speed manual transmission (standard) or an available 5-speed automatic transmission. Available Real Time 4WD™ can enhance all-weather traction. The interior provides seating for up to four people along with a cargo area that adapts to large items with its flip-up rear seats that fold flat, fold up and to the side, or can be removed altogether (64-plus seating arrangements). The Element EX has a water resistant urethane-coated utility floor that wipes down for ease-of-cleaning and seat fabric that resists moisture.

For 2009, all Elements incorporate significant exterior styling changes that include new front grille and bumper designs, restyled front fenders (now metal, previously composite material), a new hood design, squared wheel arches, and new headlight and taillight configurations. Interior enhancements include revised dashboard color combinations with titanium-look side linings, new fabric patterns, and enhanced switchgear designs and instrument panel meter graphics. The Element EX exclusively adds a new convertible center console with a removable cooler/storage box.

————-

Dog-friendly Element coming from Honda – Final Design

At the New York International Auto Show, Honda displayed new dog-friendly transportation concepts designed for the Honda Element.

The Dog Friendly™ components demonstrate the potential for a dedicated pet restraint system designed to meet the needs of dog owners. A finalized version of the Dog Friendly Element is scheduled to debut this fall.

Major components will likely include:
a cushioned pet bed in the cargo area with an elevated platform; second row and cargo area pet restraint systems; an extendable cargo area load-in ramp; a 12V DC rear ventilation fan; second-row seat covers with a dog pattern design (matches the bed fabric); all-season rubber floor mats with a toy bone pattern; a spill-resistant water bowl; and Dog Friendly exterior emblems.

“In an interesting turn of events, cars are now chasing dogs,” said John Mendel, executive vice president of American Honda. “Factory integration of a cushioned pet bed, restraint systems and other components is intended to transform the Element into the ultimate dog car.”

The Dog Friendly equipment, engineered specifically for the Element, is designed to accommodate the transportation of dogs in the second-row passenger seats or in the cargo area. The restraint system concepts were designed and fabricated by Takata Corporation, one of the world’s leading automotive safety systems suppliers, exclusively for display on the Dog Friendly Honda Element concept vehicle.

The restraint concepts are intended to complement the potential of the vehicle’s existing restraint systems by helping to protect the dog and helping to prevent injuries to other vehicle occupants due to an unrestrained dog impacting them in a collision. For convenience, a ramp is included to help dogs access the rear cargo area. The ramp stores underneath the bed platform and can be conveniently accessed when the rear tailgate is down.

The Element has long been recognized for its dog-friendly interior with an easy-to-clean urethane floor and expansive, flat cargo area (up to 74.6 cu-ft. with rear seats removed), wide-opening side cargo doors, low lift-in height, and accommodating dimensions for tall items. The consumer pet travel advice Web site, Dogcars.com, honored the 2007 Honda Element with its first-ever “Dog Car of the Year” award.

Substantially restyled for the 2009 model year and available with new features, the Honda Element builds on its spacious and versatile SUV character with a more chiseled exterior appearance and a refreshed interior design. Three unique Element styles are available that range from the rugged and simple Element LX, to the more refined Element EX, to the sporty Element SC.

Powered by a 2.4-liter i-VTEC® 4-cylinder engine, the Element is available with either a 5-speed manual transmission (standard) or an available 5-speed automatic transmission. Available Real Time 4WD™ can enhance all-weather traction. The interior provides seating for up to four people along with a cargo area that adapts to large items with its flip-up rear seats that fold flat, fold up and to the side, or can be removed altogether (64-plus seating arrangements). The Element EX has a water resistant urethane-coated utility floor that wipes down for ease-of-cleaning and seat fabric that resists moisture.

For 2009, all Elements incorporate significant exterior styling changes that include new front grille and bumper designs, restyled front fenders (now metal, previously composite material), a new hood design, squared wheel arches, and new headlight and taillight configurations. Interior enhancements include revised dashboard color combinations with titanium-look side linings, new fabric patterns, and enhanced switchgear designs and instrument panel meter graphics. The Element EX exclusively adds a new convertible center console with a removable cooler/storage box. (Photo from The Wall Street Journal)

Check one of these out (should be rolling of the assembly lines at any time) and then nudge Ford to make one… a peterized Flex!!  The American Company that didn’t take bailout money, doesn’t belong to the government or a primarily to a foreign company and builds cars here at home.

Posted:  Just One More Pet – Cross-Posted:  Marion’s Place

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September 28, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, pet products, Pet Travel, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

With Pets Travel Series: Have Dog, Will Travel: Tips For Taking Your Pet On The Road – Part II

In his short life, my dog Norman (a.k.a. “Norm”) has marked his territory in two foreign countries and almost all the states east of the Mississippi.

He recently flew back from Guatemala and looks forward to a bit of a rest before his next journey. Right now, he is sniffing a cat’s butt.

The first question many people ask about Norm is how we manage to travel with him. Certainly his size assists in this process, but many people are curious as to how to prepare to take a pet on the road. There seems to be a self-defeatist attitude about traveling with pets, whether it is the cost of care or the bureaucracy involved with crossing borders.

On the road, I’ve found people seemed more eager to share stories of the furry “baby” they left behind, then of their children or grandchildren. Deep down, I think this proves that the average person would rather take their dog traveling than their kids.

Here are some tips, facts, and myths about getting from point ‘A’, to point ‘B’ with your pet.

Befriend Your Veterinarian

Everything you do with regard to travel and your pet will begin with a licensed veterinarian. Your life will be much easier if you know this person and they know your pet. Get them a Christmas card and include a picture of your animal. The better they know your pet, the faster they’ll be able to find the records.

Trains, Planes or Automobiles

Within the U.S., personal automobile is your best bet. Amtrak and Greyhound have a zero-tolerance policy on non-service animals. New York public transportation – in quite a break from their oft draconian bylaws – allows animals to ride, provided they are muzzled or riding in a carrier. Norm rode the Staten Island Ferry with no problem. Dogfriendly.com has an excellent list of U.S. public transportation systems that are pet-friendly.

Within the U.S., personal automobile is your best bet.

Airlines often accept pets, but vary as to how much they charge and what regulations govern their accommodations. Norm rides in the cabin because he weighs 7 lbs (soaking wet, with his carrier). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) leaves it up to the airlines as to whether or not to allow pets.

If the airline does allow pets, standard FAA carry-on baggage policies apply. Delta recently upped their pet fee to $75, per itinerary ($150 round trip). United Airlines charges $100. TACA charges nothing, provided the animal is your only carry-on. Spirit Air charges $75 and only allows pets in carry-on. Check with your carrier for price and – if you make your reservation online – call to reserve a slot for your pet.

Health Forms

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Form 7001 is a 30-day, USDA-approved, sextuplicated certificate of health and is the cornerstone of any international and interstate travel for your pet. The form itself costs the vet $15, so keep an eye on how much overhead the vet is adding. It should be accompanied by an actual checkup and certifies that your pet is free of major diseases.

Rabies and/or Vaccination Record

This is something the vet should be maintaining anyway. There is no direct charge for this, but the USDA needs to corroborate this with the Health Certificate. This document is longer lasting, so as long as your pet’s vaccinations are up to date, you don’t need anything more than the original copy.

Microchips

Dog on the RoadAs a computer technician and sci-fi fan, I delight at the thought of turning Norm into a cyborg. Unfortunately, “micro chipping” is not nearly so grand, and is merely a common-sense way of tracking your dog via a chip implanted between their shoulder blades. It does not, in any way, enhance their crime-fighting abilities.

Many countries and states, in fact, require proof that the animal is micro-chipped. Make the one time investment of $35-60 (it varies depending on the vet, chip type, and organization) to avoid any complications.

Crossing Borders

As of 1994, all 7001 forms have to be approved by Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), a division of the USDA. It costs $24 and at least one office is available in every state, but don’t waste your time checking with the USDA to find them. Instead, go straight to the APHIS website to locate the nearest office. Some consulates require their own stamp as well – the Guatemalan Consulate did, and charged $10.

One heavily-armed Guatemalan police officer even peeked in Norm’s cage, smiled, and wished us a good day as we awaited the arrival of our baggage.

One would think the people at the arrival point would be more interested in your (potentially) diseased pet than your country of origin. The reality on Norm’s trip proved quite to the contrary; USDA and the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) demanded the above forms for him to leave, while the Guatemala City Airport didn’t even look at him.

One heavily-armed Guatemalan police officer even peeked in his cage, smiled, and wished us a good day as we awaited the arrival of our baggage. When we crossed into Canada, neither the American nor Canadian authorities gave Norm a second look.

Does this mean that these forms are complete bollocks? Not so fast. A nice old American woman told me an anecdote about her dog requiring more analysis to get into Canada than their whole family. Even within the United States, Norm’s flights have had varied results.

Sometimes, the airline itself is more concerned than either country. In the end, simply having a valid health certificate, rabies vaccination record, and the after-hours emergency number for your vet should be enough to get you across any border.

Worst-Case Scenario

Under the worst of circumstances, your pet will be quarantined. This is a particularly serious issue on smaller islands such as Hawaii and Guam, where minimum five-day quarantine is mandatory. When traveling to such locations, its best to check with the consulate or tourism board prior to the trip in order to avoid complications that arise from incomplete information.

Dog on the RoadThe United States Military provides a great checklist for the most extreme circumstances–Permanent Change of Station (PCS) orders. I stumbled across this checklist. Each country will have certain concerns – identify those concerns and talk to your vet about how best to address them.

Be sure you have up-to-date information. It is important to note that quarantine is rapidly becoming an antiquated thing, with changes made to the system regularly.

Is My Pet Ready for Travel?

As I write this, Norm is sitting 15 feet away from me. We intermittently feed him beef jerky and cat food, but he’s partial to bread and Doritos. He knows his name, but only views calls of “Norm! Come!” as a general suggestion. Despite our cries, he still enjoys chasing the chickens around the yard. In short, Norm is not exactly a world-class show dog in training.

Traveling with a pet, you will have to address a few things. Lodging will be restricted to only those places that allow pets (a bigger problem in the U.S. than abroad). If you want to occasionally “step out” without said quadruped, you’ll want to mitigate any risk of separation anxiety. Being housebroken is essential, as some instances – such as long bus rides in a cargo hold – will put the pet in positions where their bodily functions may be compromised.

Of course, one of the most valuable things we did to aid Norm’s travels was to crate train him. If your pet is small, like Norm, look for an FAA carry-on approved crate. Contrary to its popular usage, Norm has come to find his crate a safe place – he goes there when he’s scared.

Final Thoughts

There was only one restaurant in Guatemala that refused us entry because of Norm: McDonald’s. At every other restaurant and bar, our polite questions about Norm’s attendance were met with a matter-of-fact attitude. It would seem fitting that the only institutions to reject him would be United States based.

Dog on the RoadWhy are we so afraid, as Americans, to have dogs around us? In my search for the answer, I have found no argument that could not be made the same for children under five. They’re filthy and if not trained properly, can wreak havoc on other patrons and even lose control of key bodily functions.

In fact, children have one extra strike against them–communicable diseases. While dogs could potentially carry bacteria and other pathogens (just the same as children) their viruses do not often translate to our physiologies. In my humble opinion, restaurant’s who ban pets for “Health Reasons” should ban children for the same.

The United States is not going to change any time soon. Its formative years have been spent in a world that knew the realities of penicillin and germs and has been raised–generally speaking–on the belief that we can stave off all illness and other gross miscellany through antibacterial soap. There is, however, a growing underground.

In New Orleans, bars such as Fahy’s Irish Pub embrace the presence of Canines-a typical Friday night will feature as many dogs as patrons. Restaurants like A.W. Schuck’s in Charleston, SC go out of their way to provide pet-friendly outdoor seating. Search hard and you’ll find the modern day rebels in the States, taking a stand against an anti-Dog and -Cat America.

The old western world, meanwhile, has been raised in the generation of existentialism; whatever will be, will be. Bringing your dog or cat into other countries-particularly in Western Europe-can be a rewarding and eye opening experience, one that will have you wondering why “Man’s Best Friend” is a social pariah in his own hometown.

Be careful to check the regulations in India and other eastern lands-while dogs may not be restricted, culture may view them in a way that makes it best to leave your dog, cat, or ferret behind.

In the end, planning your trip with your pet in mind is the key to a smooth journey. If the animal is an afterthought, you’ll run into trouble with document deadlines and airline policies. Be cognizant of who you’re booking tickets with, know the animal policies where you’re going, and keep up with your pets inoculations.

Working your pet into an itinerary will always be harder than developing an itinerary with your pet in mind.

By: Jacob Bielanski – a Technical College dropout from the boonies who drinks too much. His one-eyed cat ‘Spudnick’, travel-sized dog ‘Norm’and sexy photographer wife do most of the work.

Posted:  Just One More Pet – Cross Posted:  Marion’s Place

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September 27, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, pet products, Pet Travel, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments