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Taking Away More Liberties: WI Pet Ordinance Forces Homeowners to Choose — Your Pet or Your House

Wasau Wisconsin Pet Ordinance Limits Number of Pets Homeowners Can Keep | James and Melissa Lecker

Melissa and James Lecker

Posted on March 15, 2012 at 5:03pm by Tiffany GabbayTiffany Gabbay to the Blaze

In a push many see as a gross infringement on one’s personal liberties, a small Wisconsin town is forcing homeowners who keep more than the town’s “permitted” allotment of pets a choice: Give up your animals, or give up your house.

takinglibertiesdog.jpgJames and Melissa Lecker take their dogs for a walk near their Wausau, Wis., home.

This is the dilemma currently being faced by one couple — James and Melissa Lecker — who, unbeknownst to them, moved to Wausau with four dogs.

For Melissa, there was no “choice.”

“These dogs are our family. They’re like our children,” she said.

In Wausau, homeowners are not permitted to have more than three cats, gerbils and rabbits or two dogs.

Melissa told Fox News she was in disbelief when a police officer showed up to her door to inform her that she was subject to a $100 per day fine for being over her dog “limit.”

“I had never heard of anything like that,” she said.

“They told us that the ordinance clearly states they [City council] cannot work with us… that it’s either two dogs or that you have to move, as you can’t have four dogs here.”

Meanwhile, the town’s officials said their hands are tied as the “ordinance doesn’t allow for variance.”

According to Fox, Jeff Gold, a municipal attorney from New Jersey, said the law makes sense when it comes to dogs:

“They smell. They bark. They have excrement,” said Gold.

“You’re not punishing [the Leckers], he explains. “You’re regulating society.” Wow!!  Progressive alert!

No one from Wausau, including Mayor James Tipple returned reporters calls for comment.

Melissa says she has put her house on the market and is prepared to take a $15,000 loss in order to keep her dogs.

“I hope we can work something out,” she told Fox. “But they are just being so mean. My dogs didn’t bother anyone.”

Watch the report HERE, courtesy of Fox

Melissa and James Lecker

Melissa and James Lecke

I too would fight for my pups and would take a $15,000 loss on my house.  Pets are part of your family… They are forever!  Good for James and Melissa Lecker.

These ordinances will become more and more prevalent if we do not stand-up.  They already are in towns, cities, and states with large Progressive populations like California and primarily San Francisco (who tell you who, what kind and how many), New York, large pockets of Wisconsin and the list goes on.  They are also prevalent Internationally, from China to Europe and even pockets of New Zealand, a wide open country where there are more sheep than people. Progressives hope to regulate every moment and action of everyone’s life for their idea of “the greater good”.  Every single day we are losing rights and liberties.  Time to take a stand for pets, for parental rights (of two and 4 legged kids), for individual liberties, for the inalienable rights we are all entitled to in all circumstances.

The Lecker’s situation is not an isolated case by any means.  I was personally involved in a situation in Leisure World in CA where they changed their restriction to 1 cat or 1 dog per unit (ridiculous in a community where pets are sometimes the only friends and love its residents have).  An elderly lady living there had promised her friend and neighbor that she would take her dog if anything ever happened to her because she had no family.  Right before her friend’s death LW initiated a policy of 1 pet and left a poor dying woman to fret over her beloved pet and companion in her last hours and then left her elderly friend in a position to either sell or rent out her home in Leisure World and move to keep her word and take care of her friend’s dog or try to find a home for the pup before it had to go to the shelter or rescue and probably be put down (senior dogs are hard to place).

Nobody is advocating hoarding (which is an illness and wouldn’t be stopped by laws) but good pet parents can and should be allowed to have 4 or 5 dogs, especially if they own a house, or a combination of 6 dogs and cats plus a bird, gerbils, turtles, fish etc.  Each case should be an individual matter and should only be of concern if there is a problem.  And then it should be based on ability to care for the pets in question and the circumstances.  For some people 1 pet is too much.  For most people 2 to 4 are plenty but for some 6 to 10 are perfect.  I have been to people’s houses that only have one pet (or one baby) and you can smell the litter box or diapers the second you walk in and there is a mess or fur/feathers (or dust) on the furniture. I have several friends with between 4 to 8 pets whose houses are no different than the ‘average house’; with either no pets, just kids or a just a couple of each.  And on the extreme, I had an acquaintance that was a vet tech and worked for the local vet that took in strays and hardship cases who had 23 pets, and probably fostered another 100 until permanent homes could be found, and her house was immaculate.  Today it is pets, tomorrow it will be children, activities, food, where you can live, what you can drive, how many vehicles you can own and the list will go on endlessly unless we stand up!

Our shelters are over-flowing because of the tough economic times added to by limit laws like in Wausau.  Everyone who can and wants to should be able to adopt just one or two more pets instead of continuing the flood of euthanization.

Please help the Leckers take a stand by calling, emailing and writing the City Council of Wausau as well as the Chamber of Commerce, Marathon County and state offices of Wisconsin.  I would suggest a call to Jeff Gold, the municipal attorney from New Jersey.  Today Wausau, tomorrow your town… your state… your neighborhood.

I care not for a man’s religion whose dog and cat are not the better for it." -Abraham Lincoln

Related:

STOP Los Angeles and Other Major Cities from Unreasonable Pet Limit Laws and Restrictions

Southfield Implements Limit on Cats – Over Reaction!

Pet-Limit Laws Unconstitutional

Massachusetts Town Puts Limits on Cat Ownership

Adopt Just One More…MV Temporarily Reduced Adoption Fees

And here we thought Chicago’s attempt to pass a five-dog limit was controversial!

Shocking Report…Gov’t to decide what pets you can own – Episode 006

Adopt Just One More Pet… MV Shelter Reduces Cat and Kitten Adoption Fees Until Sept 27th – Good Job MV!

Homeless With Pets… Choosing Pets Over Shelter

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

Chinese City’s “One Dog” Policy Has Residents Howling

Florida’s Idea of Cat Population Control

Humane Society list of pet financial aid-related organizations

Where there is a will…

Declaration of the No Kill Movement in the United States

This is in America: No Mercy: Calf Farm Cruelty Exposed We Are Still Euthanizing 4 Million Dogs Plus Additional Pets in Shelters in America Every Year… And We Allow the Murder of 3,700 Unborn Human Babies Per Day Through Abortion

Again, please help the Leckers take a stand by calling, emailing and writing the City Council of Wausau as well as the Chamber of Commerce, Marathon County and state offices of Wisconsin. I would suggest a call to Jeff Gold, the Progressive municipal attorney from New Jersey as well. Today Wausau, tomorrow your town… your state… your neighborhood.

March 19, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Dogs, Dogs, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Unconditional Love

The dog does not know he is homeless… M~

No wonder they say "Man’s BEST FRIEND." This is such an interesting picture~- This man may be alone and have nothing – BUT he has some form of companionship and love. And it’s just enough… enough to keep going for tomorrow… for one more day.

clip_image001
What a beautiful picture and wonderful thought.  The dog is man’s best friend!  The question is, “Is man dog’s best friend?”

This would be me if I were homeless.  I would never give up my furkids and go to a shelter without them and no one should be asked to.  Pets are family members and live creatures who love us unquestionably that we are responsible for.  All shelters should have facilities for pets.  Please become part of the fight to make that happen.  When you have lost everything, love keeps you going!  M~

h/t to Sherry Garrett

Related:

The “ex”-Middle & Upper Class Homeless

N.J. Pets Welcome at Hurricane Evacuation Shelters

Homeless With Pets… Choosing Pets Over Shelter

A Patchwork of Food Assistance for Pets

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

Where there is a will…

Can the U.S. Become a No Kill Nation?

Sources:

Homeless Shelters that Allow Pets

How to Help Pets of Homeless People

March 8, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Dogs, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , | 6 Comments

Little Boy and His Dog

Video:  Little Boy and His Dog

A two year old boy and his dog Toby spend the day together, being friends. It’s an amazing little video that highlights the bond between a boy and his dog.

This is a great a video.  Touches everyone’s heart, especially if you had a dog when you were younger.  But in reality, not all pet and child relationships work out this well.  Each story is different.  Not to be the wet blanket, but in general:

Dogs and Children (the other side of the coin)

Young children and dogs should never be left alone and unattended even for a moment. Young children generally do not have proper dog etiquette and dogs do not understand a child’s behavior. This can result in tragedy with any breed of dog. And many breeds are not recommended for homes with young children. Many breed’s and dog behavior can result in conflicts with small children. Small dogs are generally not good with children because children are too rough, too loud and too fast moving for them. But each dog and child relationship should be considered individually.  Remember the little boy and dog in this video are being supervised.  After all someone is filming…

It is great for a child to grow up with a pet, but always with supervision.  And unless you already have the pet when your child is born, it is better to wait until your child is old enough and calmer so they can relate to the needs of the pet and help take care of them. There are always exceptions to every rule.  Some breeds and individual dogs are extremely patient and great with kids… even young ones, like the one on this video.  And some kids love pets and have the perfect demeanor even at a young age.  Generally, however, it is better when the dogs are out of the puppy stage, so you are not dealing with 2 babies, and even better when the child is a bit older.

If you know your child has a tendency to be unkind or troubled… do not get them a pet; get them a psychologist! Let us remember that animals are live creatures and not toys or possessions.

And every parent needs to understand that somewhere along the way, your child is going to get nipped or scratched.  It is part of growing up with a pet.  Don’t over react!  A pet should be part of the family and no family member is perfect!

Kind of two opposite perspectives here…  But always better to be realistic!

June 27, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Dogs, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Should You ‘Foster’ a Pet?

When my only child headed off for school last fall, the house was quiet. Tomb quiet. Even my 6-year-old bichon frise, Rosie, felt the emptiness.

My home needed new energy, which soon arrived in a crate of three wiggling, yapping, licking and bounding dachshund puppies, who needed a foster home. Soon, 8-week-old Sunny, Red and Vinnie were filling big spaces in my heart and house with little antics — latching on to the same toy, tumbling over long-suffering Rosie, snuggling in my lap for a midmorning snooze.

Fostering rescue pets is a lesson in loving and letting go. It’s a great fit for older animal lovers who want to share themselves and their homes fully, but not forever.

"Fostering is particularly attractive to older people who generally have more flexible schedules and more time to devote to animals in need," says Kim Intino, director of shelter services for the Humane Society of the United States. Also, many shelters foot the bill for food, toys and vet bills, which makes fostering "attractive to folks on a fixed income," Intino says.

Fostering, which usually lasts between one week and three months, also can be a labor of love for snowbirds and frequent travelers, who shelter animals between trips.

"Some older people own two homes and aren’t in one area for a whole year," says Lois Lefkowitz of Virginia, who has fostered 24 animals over four years. "Fostering is a great way to have some companionship and help some dogs and cats."

Although national rescue groups don’t keep statistics on pet fostering, the Humane Society estimates that tens of thousands of families foster pets every year. In Sacramento, Calif., alone, the local Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals placed 1,000 animals — including rabbits and rats — with Sacramento-area foster families in 2009.

"Retired people are a prime resource for us," says Leslie Kirrene, a spokeswoman for Sacramento SPCA.

Questions to Consider Before Fostering a Pet

Dann Tardif/Blend Images/Corbis

  1. How long can I commit myself to a pet?
  2. What age pet do I want?
  3. What energy level suits me best?
  4. Does my apartment complex have pet restrictions?
  5. Do I have the patience to train a young or troubled pet, or nurse an ailing pet?
  6. Can I love and let go?

To find a pet to foster, contact your local animal shelter or rescue group. For a nationwide list of animal rescue groups and animals who need a foster family, visit petfinder.com.

Source: AARP

June 18, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Difference Between No Kill Nation & Other Animal Advocacy Groups

Posted on February 22, 2011 by Hannah Sentenac

When it comes to animal advocacy, sadly, not all organizations are in it for the best interest of the animals they claim to protect, and it’s important that compassionate Americans know who’s who. Too many groups have become wealthy & powerful by preying on the empathy and altruism of Americans, while sweeping the truth about their policies and practices under the rug.

It turns out that many fans of No Kill Nation on Facebook are also fans of the Humane Society of the US, the ASPCA and/or PETA. On the surface that might seem logical, since all organizations revolve around animal welfare, but the reality is, the philosophy that guides No Kill Nation couldn’t differ more from the philosophy these other groups subscribe to.

Many Americans believe (as I once did), that the HSUS, the ASPCA and PETA are working to save the lives of animals. Many believe that the hard-earned money they donate in response to the heartbreaking TV commercials and fundraising campaigns goes directly to the causes these organizations promote. Many believe that these groups are the biggest proponents for No Kill policies. Unfortunately, all of these statements are patently false.

What’s the difference between No Kill Nation and these other organizations? The main difference is a fundamental belief that a No Kill Nation is possible. These other organizations, despite the message they publicly promote, do NOT believe in the concept of No Kill, and in fact they work against it. They advocate killing, and they often espouse the idea that companion animals are “better off dead” than to be in the hands of humans. This comes from a deep-seated belief that human beings are bad – not to be trusted, and will abuse and neglect animals given the opportunity. In the end, this mentality serves to punish the animals, and leads to millions of unnecessary deaths. In truth, most people love animals, and will treat them with kindness and love, given the opportunity and the education.

We are a nation that spends more than $40 billion on our pets annually. It’s a very small percentage that are abusive or neglectful. Unfortunately, many on the front lines of animal rescue see so many horror stories involving animals (due to the time they spend at the local shelters), that they become angry & resentful towards other human beings. Falling prey to these beliefs is the worst possible scenario for the animals.

Instead of killing animals because we believe that human beings can’t be trusted, we should be praising the responsible pet owners, encouraging people to adopt, and educating them on how to properly care for their pets. This way, both animals and people benefit.

The HSUS, the ASPCA and PETA are fundamentally opposed to what No Kill Nation is working to do, which is to implement the proven No Kill Equation (an 11-step set of programs and policies for shelters) and create No Kill communities across the country. This is happening in communities across the country, and it’s possible everywhere. Anyone who tells you differently is either misinformed, a proponent of the status quo of killing, or brainwashed to believe otherwise. Personally, I used to be brainwashed, and believed that killing was necessary due to “a lack of resources” and “too many animals, not enough homes”. Both are nothing more than myths – the myth of overpopulation, and the myth that money = lives saved. Statistically, there are 17 million people in the US looking for new pets annually, who could be convinced to adopt, and 3-4 million that die in shelters – that’s far more than enough homes. Additionally, the No Kill Equation can be implemented within, and often under budget – so don’t let a shelter administrator tell you that MONEY is the key to life-saving.

These myths have persisted for decades, and their continued power is why the HSUS, ASPCA and PETA take in hundreds of millions of dollars per year from compassionate Americans. When the public gains widespread awareness about where their dollars are going, and realizes that the status quo isn’t working, that animals are dying needlessly and that there IS another way, these groups will have to evolve or die. There’s no room for the acceptance and advocacy of killing. A No Kill Nation is where we’re headed, and we will arrive.

If you want to learn more about No Kill Nation, please visit the Facebook page (which just hit 100,000+ fans!) and don’t hesitate to post questions. I definitely encourage you to read further about the policies & actions of the HSUS, ASPCA and PETA. Nathan Winograd has some terrific blog posts on the topic.

If you love companion animals, if you believe that every life is precious and that every saveable animal deserves to live, than the HSUS, the ASPCA and PETA are NOT on your side … but No Kill Nation is.

h/t to: Save Shelter Pets

Related:

Shelter (noun): Something that affords protection; a refuge, a haven… instead U.S. animal shelters are inhumane death camps… in many instances!

 

The Earth is Flat, Pet Over-Population Exists and Other Myths We’ve Been Told

 

Redemption Now Available as an E-Book!

May 5, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Redemption Now Available as an E-Book!

Redemption Now Available as an E-Book!

May 2, 2011 by  Nathan J. Winograd

Redemption: The Myth of Pet Overpopulation and the No Kill Revolution in America is now available as an e-book for your Nook, iPad, Kindle, or other e-reader. You can purchase it on iTunes or the B&N Nook store.

Now when someone challenges you on No Kill, the myth of pet overpopulation, why the cages are empty, PETA’s reign of terror, why feral cats have a right to live, whether we can adopt our way out of killing, the hows, whens, and whys of transport programs, saving pit bulls, and more, you’ll have it all at your fingertips.

Redemption is called “powerful and inspirational,” “ground-breaking,” and “a must read for anyone who cares about animals.” Winner of USA Book News Award for Best Book (Animals/Pets), a Best Book Muse Medallion winner by the Cat Writers Association of America, a Best Book nominee by the Dog Writers Association of America and winner of a Silver Medal from the Independent Publishers Association, the book shatters the notion that killing animals in U.S. shelters is an act of kindness.

To purchase the e-book of Redemption for your B&N Nook, iPad, etc., click here. (You can also purchase on iTunes.)

To purchase it as a regular print book, click here.

Redemption for your Kindle is available by clicking here.

You can also purchase Irreconcilable Differences, the follow-up to Redemption, as a print or e-book. Learn more by clicking here.

Source: Nathan J. Winograd  Cross-Posted at Just One More Pet

Related:

The Earth is Flat, Pet Over-Population Exists and Other Myths We’ve Been Told

From Shelter to Safety  -  The Lost Dogs: Michael Vick’s Dogs and Their Tale of Rescue and Redemption

May 3, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Abuse, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Latest Enemies of Iran: Dogs and Their Owners

The Latest Enemies of Iran: Dogs and Their Owners – Fighting Shariah

By Azadeh Moaveni

z

Iranian officials find themselves in a cultural war with the West and see what they’re offering as an ‘Islamic lifestyle’ failing measurably.”

For much of the past decade, the Iranian government has tolerated what it considers a particularly depraved and un-Islamic vice: the keeping of pet dogs.

During periodic crackdowns, police have confiscated dogs from their owners right off the street; and state media has lectured Iranians on the diseases spread by canines. The cleric Gholamreza Hassani, from the city of Urmia, has been satirized for his sermons railing against "short-legged" and "holdable" dogs. But as with the policing of many other practices (like imbibing alcoholic drinks) that are deemed impure by the mullahs but perfectly fine to many Iranians, the state has eventually relaxed and let dog lovers be.

Those days of tacit acceptance may soon be over, however. Lawmakers in Tehran have recently proposed a bill in parliament that would criminalize dog ownership, formally enshrining its punishment within the country’s Islamic penal code. The bill warns that that in addition to posing public health hazards, the popularity of dog ownership "also poses a cultural problem, a blind imitation of the vulgar culture of the West." The proposed legislation for the first time outlines specific punishments for "the walking and keeping" of "impure and dangerous animals," a definition that could feasibly include cats but for the time being seems targeted at dogs. The law would see the offending animal confiscated, the leveling of a $100-to-$500 fine on the owner, but leaves the fate of confiscated dogs uncertain. "Considering the several thousand dogs [that are kept] in Tehran alone, the problem arises as to what is going to happen to these animals," Hooman Malekpour, a veterinarian in Tehran, said to the BBC’s Persian service. If passed, the law would ultimately energize police and volunteer militias to enforce the ban systematically.

In past years, animal-rights activists in Iran have persuasively argued that sporadic campaigns against dog ownership are politically motivated and unlawful, since the prohibition surfaces in neither the country’s civil laws nor its Islamic criminal codes. But if Iran’s laws were silent for decades on the question of dogs, that is because the animals — in the capacity of pet — were as irrelevant to daily life as dinosaurs. Islam, by custom, considers dogs najes, or unclean, and for the past century cultural mores kept dog ownership down to minuscule numbers. In rural areas, dogs have traditionally aided shepherds and farmers, but as Iranians got urbanized in the past century, their dogs did not come along. In cities, aristocrats kept dogs for hunting and French-speaking dowagers kept lap dogs for company, but the vast majority of traditional Iranians, following the advice of the clergy, were leery of dogs and considered them best avoided.

That has changed in the past 15 years with the rise of an urban middle class plugged into and eager to mimic Western culture. Satellite television and Western movies opened up a world where happy children frolicked with dogs in parks and affluent families treated them like adorable children. These days, lap dogs rival designer sunglasses as the upper-middle-class Iranian’s accessory of choice. "Global norms and values capture the heart of people all around the world, and Iran is no exception," says Omid Memarian, a prominent Iranian journalist specializing in human rights. "This is very frightening for Iranian officials, who find themselves in a cultural war with the West and see what they’re offering as an ‘Islamic lifestyle’ failing measurably."

The widening acceptability of dog ownership, and its popularity among a specific slice of Iran’s population — young, urban, educated and frustrated with the Islamic government — partly explains why dogs are now generating more official hostility. In 2007, two years into the tenure of hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, security forces targeted dog owners alongside a crackdown on women’s attire and men’s "Westernized" hairstyles. In the regime’s eyes, owning a dog had become on par with wearing capri pants or sporting a mullet — a rebellious act.

The government’s tolerance for this low-level lifestyle dissidence fizzled after Ahmadinejad’s contested electoral victory in 2009, which sparked massive demonstrations and the most serious challenge to Islamic rule since the 1979 revolution. In the aftermath of that upheaval, the state has moved to tighten its control over a wide range of Iranians’ private activities, from establishing NGOs to accessing the Internet, to individual lifestyle decisions, according to Hadi Ghaemi, the director for the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran. "No doubt such attempts are motivated by a desire to squash acts of criticism and protests, even if through symbolic individual decisions that simply don’t conform to officially sanctioned lifestyles," Ghaemi says.

The criminalizing of dogs, in this context, helps the government address the legal gray areas concerning lifestyle behavior. When authorities found it difficult to police what it termed Westernized hairstyles worn by young men, it solved the problem last year by releasing a poster of specifically banned styles.

For many young people, these measures are a firm reminder that the government will brook no disobedience, whether it be chanting antigovernment slogans in the streets or sporting excessively long sideburns. Dog owners in Iran, like much of the population, are mostly preoccupied these days with inflation, joblessness and the parlous state of the country’s economy. But they will soon need to consider whether keeping their shih tzu or poodle is worth the added worry. Their dogs may face the same fate as the hundreds of street dogs that the government regularly sweeps from the streets of Tehran. "Many in Tehran and other big cities find the killing of street dogs offensive and cruel," says Memarian. "It’s like the Iranian people and officials live in two different worlds."

Source:  Time Magazine

Related: 

Dog/Pet Ownership Under Attack… Stand Up Now and Help!

Dogs… Pets – Beyond Traditional Islam

Man’s Best Friend in Shariah’s Cruel Crosshairs

And then there are the Fanatical “Green People”…

Greenies Gone Wild Again… for Earth Day  -  Back to Americans Doing More, Including Eating Our Dogs

Ditch Your Family Pet to Save the Planet… I think NOT!!

“The greatness of a nation, a people, and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated!” …Mahatma Gandhi

And When You Look at the Pet and Animal Abuse and Cruelty Around the World… Including in the United States… You Wonder if We Have Made Any Progress at All

This is in America:  No Mercy:  Calf Farm Cruelty Exposed Plus We Are Still Euthanizing 4 Million Dogs Plus Additional Pets in Shelters in America Every Year…  Join the No Kill Movement and Become Part of the Solution.  There is a Better Way!

April 28, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Dogs, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Outreach for Pets, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

JAPANESE RISK RADIATION IN EVACUATION ZONE TO RESCUE STRANDED DOGS

TOKYO (AP) — When Etsumi Ogino saw a news photo of a pack of shelties wandering through an abandoned town near Japan’s tsunami-damaged nuclear plant, she thought of her own 13-year-old canine Kein and jumped into action.

“My heart trembled,” said Ogino, a 56-year-old volunteer at an animal shelter in Chiba prefecture. “They looked just like my dog. I started searching for them right away.”

The picture that sparked the rescue.

She and others around Japan called Asahi.com, the website of the Asahi Shimbun newspaper, which had run the photo. An Associated Press photographer had snapped that photo and others of the dogs on an empty street in Minami Soma city, an area evacuated because of radiation fears.

On Saturday, the AP gave her details of where the dogs were spotted.

Ogino relayed the information to a team of animal rescuers called Sheltie Rescue. By then, the group had been getting emails from dog lovers around the country about the abandoned pack.

Through emails and Internet research it was established that the owner of the dogs was a breeder in Minami Soma. The group contacted the Fukushima city branch of the Japan Collie Club, tracked the owner down by phone at a shelter and got her go-ahead to rescue the dogs.

In the wee hours of Sunday morning, seven volunteers left Tokyo and drove over broken roads and past demolished houses to meet three other volunteers in the ghost town that Minami Soma has become. Some had prepared radiation suits and others wore simple vinyl raincoats.

The first two to arrive found the pack around the Odaka train station, near the owner’s home, where the AP team had last seen them.

“They were waiting for their owner,” said Tamiko Nakamura, a volunteer who went with the group from Tokyo.

The dogs had been left some dry food, and weren’t starving.

It took a while to entice them with snacks, and six or seven were bundled into each car. The group saved 20 dogs in all.

Most were taken to a veterinary clinic in Kanagawa prefecture just west of Tokyo. Others are being cared for by individuals in other areas.

The owner, worn down by the disaster and worrying about her dogs, was “extremely happy,” Nakamura said. She said the owner did not want her identity revealed.

Nakamura only regrets that some of the dogs in the pack ran away and countless others are still stranded in the evacuation zone.

“There are still some left behind,” she said. “I’m concerned about them and want to pull them out.”

Associated Press writer Eric Talmadge and photographer Hiro Komae spotted the dogs in Minami Soma on April 7th.

Source:  the Blaze  -  Cross-Posted at:  Just One More Pet

Related:

Against All Odds:  Japanese Dog Found Weeks After Tsunami

April 15, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, Animal and Pet Photos, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , | 2 Comments

All I Want From Santa Is YOU

“The greatest Christmas gift is giving!!” 

There are more homeless pets than there have been in decades.  There are also more needy and homeless children, seniors and unemployed than there have been in decades.  Give a little more this year and eat or entertain a little less.  Give to toys for tots, give to shelters, volunteer, and donate to give families and the needy a meal for the Christmas and Christmas Eve.  But for you group you can actually save lives… that groups I homeless pets and animals.

Many shelters and rescues have lowered their fees for adoptions.  www.bestfriends.org is one and I have heard several of the government… city and county shelters and local rescues are doing the same and are also asking for donations to feed and house pets who are not adopted before the holidays.

 

Video: All I Want From Santa Is YOU!

 

Video: It’s a Jolly Holi-dog Celebration!

There are so many animals hoping for homes this holiday season. Help Santa make a homeless pet’s dreams come true! Because the only thing they’ve ever wished for is you. Become a champion of love and help us move closer to a time of No More Homeless Pets.

Best Friends Animal Society is a nonprofit organization building no-kill programs and partnerships that will bring about a day when there are No More Homeless Pets®. At the core of Best Friends’ work is the dream that one day kindness will replace cruelty, and animals will no longer be destroyed because they are unwanted or imperfect. Spaying and neutering will be the rule for all pets and adoption will be the first option for everyone. Making this dream a reality is the mission we call No More Homeless Pets. The society’s leading initiatives in animal care and community programs are coordinated from its Kanab, Utah, headquarters, the country’s largest no-kill sanctuary. This work is made possible by the personal and financial support of a grassroots network of supporters and community partners across the nation. For more information visit: www.bestfriends.org

There are pets of all types available for adoption or fostering:  dogs, cats, horses, pocket pet, birds, reptiles, fish, exotics and the list goes one.

If you plan to get a pet for someone else… make sure that you consider whether they can afford it and then take them along to chose the pet that claims their heart.

A great gift in these tough times is supplies and food for families, friends and neighbors out of work or having a tough time, so they can keep and feed their pets.

And if you love pets, there is always room to adopt just one more pet and the holiday season is a great time to do so.  They will add to your joy and you will have saved a life!

 

A Dog Named Christmas

Video:  A Dog Named Christmas DVD (Hallmark Hall of Fame)

 

Related:

Waiting for Santa

A Dogs Rules for Christmas

Christmas for Pet People

Help the Reindeer

"Within the heart of every dog, lives the singular desire to be loved."

Best Friends Adorable Adoptables - All I want fromn Santa is you!

December 21, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animals, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , | 7 Comments

Support the Happy Act

care2 petitionsite actionAlert

In these trying economic times, it’s often hard to care for beloved pets. And it’s devastating to give up a pet because of financial hardship, but the Humanity and Pets Partnered Through the Years ("HAPPY") Act can help keep families together.

Tell the House of Representative to make pet care more affordable. »

The HAPPY Act would help people provide their pets with the quality of life they deserve and ensure that more pets can stay in their loving homes instead of on the streets or in already overburdened shelters.

Under the act, people could claim tax deductions for their pet care expenses and possibly take an annual income tax deduction for pet care expenses, including veterinary costs.

Tell your representative to support and cosponser the HAPPY Act for affordable pet care. »

Thanks for taking action!
Kayla
ThePetitionSite

Help Make Pet Care
More Affordable

Boy and His Dog

Take Action!

Take action link: http://www.care2.com/go/z/e/AF8FI/zKrQ/bKVZL

Did you know that 2 out of 3 animals who enter the shelter system never leave and that for needy or homeless families there are virtually no options for help to keep their pets!!

Related:

December 19, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Animals Out of Time - To Be Euthanized, Dogs, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Outreach for Pets, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | Leave a comment