JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

I Rescued a Human Today

“I rescued a human today!”
Her eyes met mine as she walked down the corridor peering apprehensively into the kennels. I felt her need instantly and knew I had to help her I wagged my tail, not too exuberantly, so she wouldn’t be afraid.

As she stopped at my kennel I blocked her view from a little accident I had in the back of my cage. I didn’t want her to know that I hadn’t been walked today. Sometimes the shelter keepers get too busy and I didn’t want her to think poorly of them.

As she read my kennel card I hoped that she wouldn’t feel sad about my past. I only have the future to look forward to and want to make a difference in someone’s life.

She got down on her knees and made little kissy sounds at me. I shoved my shoulder and side of my head up against the bars to comfort her. Gentle fingertips caressed my neck; she was desperate for companionship.

A tear fell down her cheek and I raised my paw to assure her that all would be well. Soon my kennel door opened and her smile was so bright that I instantly jumped into her arms. I would promise to keep her safe. I would promise to always be by her side. I would promise to do everything I could to see that radiant smile and sparkle in her eyes. I was so fortunate that she came down my corridor. So many more are out there who haven’t walked the corridors. So many more to be saved. At least I could save one.

I rescued a human today.

April 20, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , | Leave a comment

How Many Pets is Too Many??

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Puppy Love

How many pets are too many pets???  How many kids are too many kids???  It is a very individual choice and number.

Animal Planet has announced a new series about people who own a lot of animals.  They are looking for pet families with 15 or more.

Some brand them as “animal hoarders.”, and some are, but some people have enough love in their heart and the where-with-all to properly take care of and lover a large group of pets or animals.

Where is that line between realizing that you have too many pets and not being able to take care of them and just being a huge animal person or family that can.

Trying to care for too many animals can sometimes be overwhelming. There can be financial burdens, health issues, family conflicts, even the run-ins with authorities. The new show wants to see how animal lovers – and their families – deal with these challenges and offer them some help.

In a time where there are so many families experiencing financial problems and so many pets and animals needing good homes and care… permanent, temporary or foster, the goal of all animal people should be to find solutions, give people willing to adopt and care for just one more pet help and put a stop to unreasonable pet restriction rules and laws and move to a no kill philosophy by working together.

To learn more, contact us at email: realstories@petfamily.org – or call them at our toll free number: 1-877-MY8-PETS.

Ask Marion – Just One More Pet

April 8, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Rescues, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Do You Know The Real PETA & Humane Society of the United States

The editorial below indicates the real purpose of the two organizations leading the march toward domestic pet extinction.

Do You Know The Real PETA & Humane Society of the United States

By Frank Neudecker

An Editorial By Alice Fix

You will not often see negative articles in our newsletters, but every now and again we are forced to make a stand, and to speak out about what we know is for the better good for all involved. This is one such instance. We can no longer stand back and watch to see what will happen. I think that it is past time to publicly expose the real agenda of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and their cohorts in crime, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), and the animal rights agenda.

For many years we have all enjoyed the companionship of our dogs and other animals. We have been busy playing with them, taking care of them, finding fun things that we could do with them, and generally just having a great time with all the animals that live in our houses. While we have been enjoying the love and fun that our animals provide to us, there have been groups out there organizing on a grand scale trying to get our rights to own those animals taken away. Yes, that is exactly what I meant. Make no mistake about it. These people have organized on a large scale to infiltrate many major city councils and governments in the country to spread their propaganda. Their agenda is easily defined and simple. Their main objective is to take away your right to own animals. They do not want you to have the companionship of any animal, whether that is a dog, cat, horse, mouse, frog, fish or any other animal that you can think of. They are pooling their resources to get this accomplished, and have millions of dollars in their war chest for this effort.

This is a statement made by Ingrid Newkirk, the President of PETA: “I don’t use the word ‘pet.’ I think it’s speciesist language. I prefer ‘companion animal.’ For one thing, we would no longer allow breeding. People could not create different breeds. There would be no pet shops. If people had companion animals in their homes, those animals would have to be refugees from the animal shelters and the streets. You would have a protective relationship with them just as you would with an orphaned child. But as the surplus of cats and dogs (artificially engineered by centuries of forced breeding) declined, eventually companion animals would be phased out, and we would return to a more symbiotic relationship – enjoyment at a distance.” – The Harper’s Forum Book, Jack Hitt, ed., 1989, p.223.

It is interesting that Ms. Newkirk used the word “speciesist”. Allwords.com defines that word as follows:

1. The discrimination against, and exploitation of, animals by humans in the belief that humans are superior to all other species of animals and can therefore justify putting them to their own use.

One of the animal rights mantras is that all animals are created to be equal to all humans, and should have the same rights as humans. Just in case it still isn’t clear to you what their agenda is, here are a few more quotes from Ingrid Newkirk:

“One day, we would like an end to pet shops and the breeding of animals. [Dogs] would pursue their natural lives in the wild … they would have full lives, not wasting at home for someone to come home in the evening and pet them and then sit there and watch TV.”- the Chicago Daily Herald, 3/1/90

“In the end, I think it would be lovely if we stopped this whole notion of pets altogether.” – Newsday, 2/21/88

Who is Ingrid Newkirk, and why should we care what she has to say about anything? In the 1970s, Newkirk worked for Montgomery County ( Maryland), and then for the District of Columbia, as an animal protection officer and deputy sheriff, before becoming DC’s first female Poundmaster in 1978. She co-founded PETA in 1980 with established animal-rights activist Alex Pacheco. (1) PETA stands for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, but in my opinion, there is nothing ethical in what they do.

Ms. Newkirk has very close ties with several groups identified by the FBI as known terrorists groups, such as Animal Liberation Front (ALF). The animal rights groups are very well organized, and when you check closely, you will see many of the same names sitting on the boards of these radical groups. They are intertwined and closely linked through their finances, and the work that they do.

PETA operates on an annual budget of $ 29,000,000. Most of this is from donations made by ordinary citizens that don’t know the real work of PETA. Many people think that they are out to save the lives of animals after seeing all of their ads on TV and in the newspapers. That is why millions are donated to them each year.

In Virginia, the home state of PETA, in 2004, PETA adopted out 361 animals, and euthanized 2,278, according to their records. (2)Those figures aren’t good. That means that they euthanized 86.3% of their animals and only adopted out 13.7%. These figures come directly from PETA’s Annual Report and from their 2004 Tax Return. It doesn’t seem like they used that $29 million for the betterment of the majority of the animals that they came in contact with. So where is the money going? It is being spent for publicity to raise more money for one thing. It is also being used for legislative purposes. They have placed key people in city governments all over the country to try to influence legislation to take your pet ownership rights away. And they are having a lot of success with it.

You need to understand the basic difference between the “animal welfare” groups and “animal rights” groups. Although the names might sound like they have the same objectives, there is a big difference. Animal welfare groups are working to see that all animals are treated humanely. Animal rights groups are working to see that all ownership of animals comes to an end.

As I said, PETA has close ties with many other organizations. One of those organizations is the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). People donate millions to the HSUS each year, thinking that their money is going to save the lives of millions of animals. Nothing could be further from the truth. The HSUS does not own a single animal shelter anywhere in the country. Although many shelters have the words Humane Society in their names, they are not associated in any way with the HSUS. The HSUS does not sponsor any spay or neuter clinic anywhere in the country. They do donate a very small percent of the annual budget to a few local humane societies, around $2 million annually, which just happens to be less than the amount that they spend in travel each year. Their major money is sent on fund raising and legislative activity. In 2005 they spent $28 million for public mailings, $6 million in vegan education, $10 million in legislative campaigns and litigation. Their income for that year was close to $125 million.

This is an interesting quote from Wayne Pacelle: “We have no ethical obligation to preserve the different breeds of livestock produced through selective breeding …One generation and out. We have no problems with the extinction of domestic animals. They are creations of human selective breeding.” -Animal People News (May 1, 1993) (3) When you combine other statements that he has made, with the above statement, in my opinion the meaning of this statement is that if we could spay and neuter all animals, we could eliminate pet ownership within one generation. “One generation and out” would mean to me that they are gone and are eliminated in only one generation.

Quietly sitting back and maybe not being aware, we are now allowing the HSUS to make presentations at our local schools, with the definite purpose to educate our children about how bad pet ownership is, to indoctrinate children to the thought that animals should be free and not kept as pets. They are doing this in the same way that they have infiltrated city councils and local governments all across the country, quietly and matter-of-factly.

“Shortly after taking office, Pacelle announced a merger with the Fund For Animals which have assets of over $20 million, and the Doris Day Animal League. The combined group estimated its 2005 budget at “over $95 million” and also announced the formation of a new “political organization,” which will “allow for a more substantial investment of resources in political and lobbying activities.” (4) So that is where we find ourselves today. With the HSUS and PETA combined annual budgets of over $124 million for political and lobbying efforts to take away our rights to own animals. And that figure does not include the many splinter organizations that have been formed from these two major organizations. We are in an uphill battle now, and it will be the fight of our lives to keep our rights to own pets.

They are going at it from many different angles. One way is to get Breed Specific Legislation (BSL) passed. The banning of Pit-Bulls all over the country is a good example. That has caught on like wildfires. The animal rights groups have said if they can just get one breed banned, then it will be easy to add others to it at a later date, until eventually all breeds are banned. Another way that they are going about it is to have a mandatory spay and neuter law in place. Just think about it, if all domestic animals are spayed and neutered, when they die, there will be no more domestic animals. Those same words have been said by Wayne Pacelle, the President of the HSUS. They have a very well thought out and planned agenda, and they are counting on the ignorance of the American people to get their agenda accomplished. Well guess what: Ignorance can be overcome by education. The American people may be ignorant about the facts, but they are not stupid. They can be educated. We were ignorant before 9-11, and look what effect that had. It caused all Americans to become educated and unite and fight to prevent that from happening again. The difference here is that we are being attacked from within our own country. We are under strong attack by the animal rights groups, and I hope that we don’t just stand by and allow it to happen.

The animal rights groups are publicly stating that we need to get laws passed so that they can close down all the puppy mills and commercial breeding facilities that have their animals living in inhumane conditions. Just about everyone would agree with the idea that animals should be treated humanely. But that is just the vehicle that they are using to try to do away with all animal ownership, period. And that is not a statement that they are being all that public about.

You can become active in this fight by telling your friends and neighbors what is going on. You can be an instrument of education. You can also fight this kind of legislation when it is presented in your area. Go to the City Council meetings and make your voice heard. Write letters to the state and federal government officials to offer your services to be on any animal related committee. In short get the word out to any and all of your friends that own pets. Let them know what is going on. If enough people stop funding the animal rights organizations, we can put them out of business. There is not much that they can do without operating funds.

The next time you think about making a donation to any of these organizations, you had better think long and hard about whether you really want your money being spent to take away your rights.

PETA
HUMANE SOCIETY OF THE UNITED STATES
FARM SANCTUARY
FUND FOR ANIMALS
DORIS DAY ANIMAL LEAGUE
EARTH SAVE
GREEN PEACE
PHYSICIANS COMMITTEE FOR RESPONSIBLE MEDICINE
ANIMAL LIBERATION FRONT (ALF)
FRIENDS OF ANIMALS
IN DEFENSE OF ANIMALS

Right now the HSUS has started their “First Strike Campaign”. I find that an interesting choice of names. At visualthesaurus.com they define first strike as follows:

First Strike: An attack that is intended to seize or inflict damage on or destroy an objective.

Most people think that attack is on inhumane treatment of animals. They still don’t know it is an attack to take your animals away from you. Last year over 10 million people donated money to the HSUS because of their massive spending on advertising. Most of those 10 million people had no idea what their money was actually going to support.

Better places to donate your money that will fight for your rights to own animals are listed below. These groups are working hard to protect your right to own animals, and to expose the true agenda to much of the animal legislation going on all over the country.

NATIONAL ANIMAL INTEREST ALLIANCE
www.naiaonline.org

SPORTSMEN’S AND ANIMAL OWNERS’ VOTING ALLIANCE
www.saova.org

AMERICAN DOG OWNERS ASSOCIATION
www.adoa.org

U S SPORTSMAN ALLIANCE
www.ussportsmen.org

YOU CAN EITHER MAKE YOUR DONATIONS WORK FOR YOU OR AGAINST YOU. THAT DECISION IS YOURS TO MAKE!

Footnotes for Reference:

1) http://www.activistcash.com/biography.cfm/bid/456

2) www.nokillnow.comPetaDVACreporting.pdf

3) http://www.animalscam.com/quotes.cfm

4) http://www.activistcash.com/organization_overview.cfm/oid/136

This article will first appear in the March, 2007 issue (Volume V Issue 2) of the Rocky Mountain Wrinkle, the newsletter of the Centennial Chinese Shar-Pei Club, Inc. Any reference to this article must give full credit to Rocky Mountain Wrinkle, and the Centennial Chinese Shar-Pei Club, Inc. www.centennialsharpeiclub.org

Permission must be granted to use any articles from our newsletters, and we must get a credit line for any article that is granted permission to use, with a link to our website. Anyone wishing to reprint any of our articles should contact Alice for written permission.

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We should all me moving toward a complete no kill philosophy.  We should be setting up networks to foster pets and facilities to house all animals and pets until they find a new home.  We should also be changing the laws restricting the number of pets people can own from only one or two, in some city areas, to a more reasonable and animal friendly number and we should be toughening the abuse laws and sentences against animals.

Fight for your rights and for what is right for pets and all animals.

Declaration of the No Kill Movement of the United States

Posted:  Just One More Pet

March 19, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Declaration of the No Kill Movement in the United States

Declaration of the No Kill Movement in the United States

This year, some five million dogs and cats will be killed in shelters. The vast majority can and should be placed into loving homes or should never enter shelters in the first place. But there is hope.

No Kill sheltering models, based on innovative, non-lethal programs and services, have already saved the lives of tens of thousands of animals. But instead of embracing No Kill, many shelters—and their national agency allies—cling to their failed models of the past, models that result in the killing of millions of dogs and cats in U.S. shelters every year.

No Kill is a revolution. And behind every revolution is a declaration—a statement of grievances, and a listing of rights and principles that underscore our great hope for the future. We assert that a No Kill nation is within our reach—that the killing can and should be brought to an end. Join us in endorsingThe Declaration of the No Kill Movement in the United States.

It is open to every individual, every group, and every agency that wants to bring about an end to the killing by implementing the programs and services that will establish a No Kill nation. Programs like ensuring public access to affordable spay/neuter services, allowing rescue groups to save animals on death row, and communitywide Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) for feral cats. These are not radical concepts, but in the current sheltering world, one can be ostracized for daring to proclaim the simple truths that population control killing is not an act of kindness and that feral cats have a right to live.

Join us in speaking for those who can’t. In the length of time it will take you to read the Declaration, nearly one hundred dogs and cats will be needlessly killed.

I. Preamble

One hundred and fifty years ago, societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals and other humane organizations were founded to establish standards for humane treatment of animals, to promote their rights, and to protect them from harm. This marked the formal beginning of the humane movement in the United States.

The scope and influence of these early humane organizations were testament to the public’s concern for animals. It did not take long for them to set their sights on the abuse of homeless animals and cruel methods of killing by public pounds. It was common practice at the time for city and town dogcatchers to beat, drown, or shoot homeless animals.

Many humane agencies responded by entering into animal control contracts with towns and cities to ensure that the killing was done more humanely. But in taking on municipal animal control duties, these agencies abandoned their lifesaving and life-enhancing platforms when those beliefs conflicted with their contractual responsibilities. In the current era, where laws require killing by even more “humane” methods, these contradictions have become starker.

Increasingly, the practices of both humane societies and municipal animal control agencies are out of step with public sentiment. Today, most Americans hold the humane treatment of animals as a personal value, which is reflected in our laws, cultural practices, the proliferation of organizations founded for animal protection, increased per capita spending on animal care, and great advancements in veterinary medicine. But the agencies that the public expects to protect animals are instead killing more than five million animals annually.

Lifesaving alternatives to the mass killing of animals in shelters have existed for decades. These lifesaving methods are based on innovative, humane, nonlethal programs and services that have proven that the killing can be brought to an end. Too many of these agencies, however, remain mired in the kill philosophies of the past, unwilling to or hampered from exploring and adopting methods that save lives. This is a breach of their public trust, a gross deviation from their responsibility to protect animals, and a point of view that we, as caring people and a humane community, can no longer accept or tolerate.

We assert that a No Kill nation is within our reach—that the killing can and must be brought to an end. It is up to each of us working individually and together to implement sheltering models that have already saved tens of thousands of animals in progressive communities. If we work together—with certainty of purpose, assured of our own success, with the commitment that “what must be done, will be done”—the attainment of our goals will not be far off.

II. No Kill Resolution

Whereas, the right to live is every animal’s most basic and fundamental right;

Whereas, societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals and other humane organizationswere founded to establish standards for humane treatment of animals, to promote their rights, and to protect them from harm;

Whereas, traditional sheltering practices allow the mass killing of sheltered animals;

Whereas, every year shelters in the United States are killing millions of healthy and treatable animals who could be placed in homes, and are also killing millions of feral cats who do not belong in shelters;

Whereas, life always takes precedence over expediency;

Whereas, the No Kill movement in the United States has successfully implemented new and innovative programs that provide alternatives to mass killing;

Whereas, lifesaving change will come about only if No Kill programs are embraced and further developed;

Whereas, failure to implement No Kill programs constitutes a breach of the public’s trust in the sheltering community;

Now, therefore, be it resolved that No Kill policies and procedures are the only legitimate foundation for animal sheltering; and,

It is incumbent upon all shelters and animal groups to embrace the philosophy of No Kill, to immediately begin implementing programs and services that will end the mass killing of sheltered animals, and to reject the failed kill-oriented practices of the past.

III. Statement of Rights

We acknowledge the following:

  • Sheltered animals have a right to live;
  • Feral cats have a right to their lives and their habitats;
  • Animals, rescuers, and the public have a right to expect animal protection organizations and animal shelters to do everything in their power to promote, protect, and advocate for the lives of animals;
  • Animal protection groups, rescue groups, and No Kill shelters have a right to take into their custody animals who would otherwise be killed by animal shelters;
  • Taxpayers and community members have a right to have their government spend tax monies on programs and services whose purpose is to save and enhance the lives of all animals;
  • Taxpayers and community members have a right to full and complete disclosure about how animal shelters operate.

IV. Guiding Principles

No Kill is achieved only by guaranteeing the following:

  • Life to all healthy animals, and to all sick, injured, or vicious animals where medical or behavioral intervention would alter a poor or grave prognosis;
  • The right of feral cats to live in their habitats.

These conditions can be achieved only through adherence to the following:

  • Shelters and humane groups end the killing of healthy and treatable animals, including feral cats;
  • Every animal in a shelter receives individual consideration, regardless of how many animals a shelter takes in, or whether such animals are healthy, underaged, elderly, sick, injured, traumatized, or feral;
  • Shelters and humane organizations discontinue the use of language that misleads the public and glosses over the nature of their actions, such as “euthanasia,” “unadoptable,” “fractious,” “putting them to sleep,” and other euphemisms that downplay the gravity of ending life and make the task of killing easier;
  • Shelters are open to the public during hours that permit working people to reclaim or adopt animals during nonworking hours;
  • Shelters and other government agencies promote spay/neuter programs and mandate that animals be spayed or neutered before adoption;
  • Public shelters work with humane animal adoption organizations to the fullest extent to promote the adoption of animals and to reduce the rate of killing;
  • Shelters provide care and treatment for all animals in shelters to the extent necessary, including prompt veterinary care, adequate nutrition, shelter, exercise, and socialization;
  • Shelters are held accountable for and make information publicly available about all the animals in their care.

V. No Kill Standards

The implementation of these lifesaving procedures, policies, and programs must be the immediate goal of every shelter, and animal control and animal welfare agency:

  • Formal, active commitment by shelter directors, management, and staff to lifesaving programs and policies, and dedication to promptly ending mass killing of shelter animals;
  • Immediate implementation of the following programs by all publicly funded or subsidized animal shelters:
  • An end to the policy of accepting trapped feral cats to be destroyed as unadoptable, and implementation of TNR as the accepted method of feral cat control by educating the public about TNR and offering TNR program services;
  • An end to the use of temperament testing that results in killing animals who are not truly vicious (e.g., shy/timid cats and frightened dogs) but who can be placed in homes, or are feral cats who can be returned or released;
  • Abolishment of trapping, lending traps to the public to capture animals, and support of trapping by shelters, governments, and pest control companies for the purposes of removing animals to be killed;
  • An end to owner-requested killing of animals unless the shelter has made an independent determination that the animal is irremediably suffering or cannot be rehabilitated;
  • The repeal of unenforceable and counter-productive animal control ordinances such as cat licensing and leash laws, pet limit laws, bans on feeding stray animals, and bans on specific breeds.
      • High-volume, low- and no-cost spay/neuter services;
      • A foster care network for underaged, traumatized, sick, injured, or other animals needing refuge before any sheltered animal is killed, unless the prognosis for rehabilitation of that individual animal is poor or grave;
      • Comprehensive adoption programs that operate during weekend and evening hours and include offsite adoption venues;
      • Medical and behavioral rehabilitation programs;
      • Pet retention programs to solve medical, environmental, or behavioral problems and keep animals with their caring and responsible caregivers;
      • Trap-Neuter-Return or Release (TNR) programs;
      • Rescue group access to shelter animals;
      • Volunteer programs to socialize animals, promote adoptions, and help in the operations of the shelter;
      • Documentation before any animal is killed that all efforts to save the animal have been considered, including medical and behavioral rehabilitation, foster care, rescue groups, neuter and release, and adoption.

Save the Life of Just One More…Animal by Adopting Just One More!

March 12, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Animals Adopting Animals, Animals Out of Time - To Be Euthanized, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | 4 Comments

March start of kitten, puppy season…

By LARISSA GRAHAM/The Lufkin Daily News

 This year, Lufkin Animal Control will take in approximately 7,000 dogs and cats for a variety of reasons, whether they are surrendered by their owners, dropped off as strays, or caught by animal control.

Of those, only 10 percent of the dogs and 2 percent of the cats will make it to new homes. The rest will be euthanized to make room for a constant flow of incoming animals.

According to Rhonda McLendon, director of Lufkin Animal Control, March marks the beginning of puppy and kitten season, when the shelter will see a huge increase in the numbers of puppies and kittens left with them.

“Unfortunately, a lot of folks out there bring us puppies and kittens. Almost every day this time of year we’ll get a litter,” McLendon said.

During the summer, the shelter will take in anywhere from 600 to 1,000 animals a month.

“We’re taking in vast numbers and we’re adopting a few and getting a few back to their owners and a few to rescues,” McLendon said. “The numbers are pretty ridiculous.”

The reason for their staggering intake numbers, McLendon said, is because people are allowing their pets, whether by choice or by accident, to reproduce.

“Way too many animals are being born, and there just aren’t enough homes out there for them,” McLendon said.

McLendon hopes that education will encourage more people to choose to spay or neuter their pets.

Currently, the city of Lufkin works with Southwood Drive Animal Clinic, allowing all animals adopted from animal control to be spayed or neutered for a much lower fee than a veterinarian would normally charge. The Humane Society has a low-cost spay and neuter program, as does O’Malley Alley Cat, which also offers trap-and-release programs.

“There’s folks out there that you can go to and get help for spay and neuter, but a lot of folks don’t because they don’t realize how bad the overpopulation problem is. They’re used to seeing their dog and their neighbor’s dog and maybe a few puppies. But if you come in here every day for a week you would be astounded at the number of animals that come through here,” McLendon said.

According to McLendon, the shelter’s capacity varies depending on the time of year. By the end of March, McLendon expects to house between 150 and 175 animals, with around 200 a day during the summer months. Because the shelter acts as an evacuation center, anywhere from 450 to 500 animals may stay there during a hurricane evacuation.

“Numbers are fairly high because the incoming animals fluctuate all the time,” McLendon said.

Dogs usually remain up for adoption for 30 days, depending on their health, temperament, adoptability and the time of year. During the summer months, dogs are euthanized at a faster rate because of a higher intake.

Cats do not stay as long, due to higher intake and lower adoption rates. On average, cats are euthanized after three weeks, but that drops down to two weeks during kitten season.

“Unfortunately there’s not a whole lot of folks that come to the shelter to adopt a cat,” McLendon said.

More smaller dogs are coming into the shelter than they did in previous years, McLendon said. There has been a problem with people trying to sell dogs at Walmart without a breeder permit, she said.

In order to sell dogs in Lufkin, one must have a permit, pay the applicable fees and, if the breeder lives inside city limits, go through an inspection. Out-of-town sellers still need the proper paperwork in order to sell dogs, McLendon said.

“Even if you’re selling them from your own home, as long as you’re in city limits, you need a permit,” McLendon said.

In addition to education about spaying and neutering, McLendon hopes to dispel some rumors surrounding dogs adopted from animal shelters.

Approximately 25 percent of all dogs that end up in shelters are pure bred, McLendon said.

“We see pit bulls and labs all the time,” McLendon said. “An enormous number of those come into the shelter.”

However, Animal Control will also see popular breeds like dachshunds, schnauzers, chihuahuas and poodles.

“Unless you’re wanting something that’s unusual, then the shelter has either got one or will be getting one. We’ll get the Yorkies in and we’ll get Akitas and some of the breeds that are not seen very often, too,” McLendon said. “We get a little of everything.”

According to McLendon, people will often bring in entire litters of lab puppies, believing that because they’re cute they’ll be adopted.

“There’s a good chance they won’t even go up for adoption because that same day I may get three or four more litters, and there’s so many,” McLendon said. “We’ll have 30 or 40 puppies come in and only two or three of them will get selected for adoption.”

Black dogs and cats have even less of a chance of adoption, McLendon added.

“The black labs are adopted less than any other dogs, and the black lab is the number one dog we see,” McLendon said.

When it comes to pure-bred cats, Animal Control sees mostly Siamese, though they will get other breeds on occasion.

“If you’re not wanting to spend a ton of money on a pet that is show quality, this is a good place to come,” McLendon said. “What we put up for adoption are high-quality pets.”

Another myth McLendon wants to put to rest is the idea that a dog goes into a shelter because it has temperament issues, or is sick or injured.

“We do get the ones that are sick, injured or with temperament problems, but we don’t put them on the adoption rows,” McLendon said. “The reason they’re here is because someone turns them in, they’re caught, or their owner surrenders them.”

McLendon stressed the importance of pet ID tags. According to McLendon, 95 percent of lost animals that are not wearing ID tags will not be reunited with their families.

In East Texas, many people believe their children need to see a pet have a litter of babies, McLendon said. However, she added, that is not the case.

“(Children) go through the birthing process in their science classes,” McLendon said. “What your kids need to learn is pet responsibility, and when you’re allowing your pet to have puppies or kittens that are not guaranteed homes from now on, chances are that one of them or their babies will come to the shelter are very high.”

There are just not enough homes for the massive intake of animals, McLendon said. If parents want their children to interact with puppies or kittens, or see pregnant pets, they are welcome to visit the shelter. There, children will be allowed to play with the puppies and kittens as long as they like.

“Teach (your kids) responsibility as far as pet overpopulation. It’s only going to get better when people are spaying or neutering,” McLendon said.

Other common misconceptions, McLendon added, include the belief that it is unhealthy to spay a female pet before she has had a litter of babies, and that animals who have been fixed will become fat or lazy. In female dogs, there is a much lower occurence of some cancers if they are spayed before they have puppies. Males who have been neutered are less likely to roam and get into fights over females. In addition, McLendon said, they may not be as territorial as a male dog who has not been neutered.

As for becoming fat and lazy, McLendon added that some dogs who become overweight were already predisposed to obesity, or they could be overfed. Spaying or neutering does not change activity level, McLendon said.

While a puppy may be cute, McLendon warned against adopting just for the ‘cute factor.’ While the puppy stage does not last long, it brings with it the chewing stage, along with the need for housebreaking and proper socialization. Some dogs in the shelter are already housebroken and may have been raised with children. In addition, the risk of chewing is greatly lower in adult dogs because they have already passed the teething stage.

“There’s just a lot of great things about adopting an adult dog,” McLendon said.

For more information on Animal Control or animals up for adoption, anyone interested may contact Animal Control at 633-0218.

Larissa Graham’s e-mail address – is: lgraham@lufkindailynews.comThe Lufkin Daily News

Being a pet parent requires responsibility and love, just like we give our human children, grandchildren and charges.  Part of being a responsible pet owner is making reproductions decisions and making sure there are homes for the pus and kittens, if there are some.  And those decisions is not always as one sided or uncomplicated as it may seem:

No Kill Nation: MANDATORY SPAY NEUTER LAWS ACROSS AMERICA HAVE LED TO:
▪ more animals killed
▪ more animals impounded
▪ increased animal control costs
▪ decreased licensing revenues.

www.floridaanimallaws.org

Ask Marion – JOMP

Posted:  Just One More Pet

March 10, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The No-Kill Nation Movement

The No-Kill Movement is sure becoming more popular everyday, we now have many communities fighting towards this goal. Lets show them some support by joining the ones that are already on FACEBOOK, and lets applaud their efforts!!!

Nola NoKill Task Force
Austin No Kill Coalition
No Kill Baton Rouge
No Kill Houston
Fix Austin
FixSanFrancisco.org
Citizens for a No-Kill Philadelphia
www.FixUnitedStates.org

Isn’t this AWESOME? If your community is not listed here, and they are working towards the No-Kill goal, perhaps you could help them join Facebook, or if your community is not involved in this movement at all, it is a great opportunity for YOU to START doing something!!

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE! WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR????

“Be the change you wish to see in the world.”~ Mahatma Gandhi

No Kill Nation on Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/NOKILLNATION

Posted:  Just One More Pet – on Facebook:  http://twitter.com/JustOneMorePet

March 1, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Animals Out of Time - To Be Euthanized, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Greenies sic Fido in new guilt push: "Time to Eat the Dog: The Real Guide to Sustainable Living"

Greenies sic Fido in new guilt push…

Do you love your pet? Of course you do.

So you might want to hide your pooch from the greenies, because now they want you to sacrifice your pet–in the name of the Earth.

An outrageous new book with the disgusting title, “Time to Eat the Dog: The Real Guide to Sustainable Living” attempts to make the weak case that a medium-sized dog does more damage to the planet than two SUVs, mostly because of all the land and energy it takes to make dog food.
But the eco-nuts don’t really want you to ditch the dog and keep the SUV–they want you to shed both to live in their Luddite paradise.

The authors of this brainless book also accuse our beloved companions of attacking the local wildlife and polluting the planet with their poop. As if that’s not a natural part of life for ANY animal, wild or domestic–including human beings.

But I do agree with them on one point: Store-bought dog food is wasteful–but not because it destroys the planet. It’s expensive and unhealthy.

My beloved Weimaraner, Silky, eats raw chicken necks (with the skin on), fatty raw hamburger, raw eggs (including the shell) and a raw pork or beef joint two or three times a week. And you wouldn’t believe how healthy my little darling is–all muscle, covered in the shiniest coat of fur you’ve ever seen.

If you want to give it a try, start by working these healthy raw meats into the supermarket dog food. Over time, use less kibble and more meat.

Just do it for your dog’s health and not for some imaginary environmental impact. That’s just a smokescreen for an extremist movement with a radical left-wing political agenda. They haven’t gotten very far with science–so now they’re trying guilt.

They want you to feel guilty about eating meat, guilty about driving to work, guilty about having a pet–guilty about living. Not long ago, one environmental space cadet even declared that the human race would need to become vegans to survive.

They come up with ridiculous concepts like “ecological footprint” or “carbon footprint”–call it what you want, there’s no getting around the fact that it’s simply been pulled out of thin air, manufactured to make you feel… you guessed it: Guilty!

Some of them even try to collect money off you based on the theoretical size of your nonexistent imaginary carbon footprint.

Forget blackmail–you can call this ploy greenmail.

And if you’re sick of vegans claiming moral superiority, speak up…

Dr. William Campbell Douglas II, M.D.

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Related:

Ditch Your Family Pet to Save the planet – I Think NOT!!

January 11, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Nutrition, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

California Chihuahuas Arrive at the ASPCA

On Wednesday, more than a dozen jet-setting Chihuahuas arrived at the ASPCA NYC headquarters from California, which is experiencing a dramatic influx of the tiny pups in shelters statewide. These pooches are ideal for big-city living, and will soon be ready for adoption from our Manhattan Adoption Center.

On January 6, the ASPCA Adoption Center welcomed 15 Chihuahuas who flew from California to the Big Apple in search of new forever homes. The dogs originated from the City of San Francisco Animal Care & Control, and their in-cabin transportation was donated by Virgin Airlines. After some post-travel rest and relaxation, the tiny pups will be made available for adoption next week at the ASPCA in Manhattan.

Over the past year, California shelters have seen a dramatic increase in Chihuahua intakes—this toy breed now makes up more than 30% of the state’s shelter dog population. While demand for Chihuahuas has declined in much of the Golden State, their popularity in New York City is as high as ever.

“They’re portable, and people like portability in the city,” said Gail Buchwald, Senior Vice President for the ASPCA Adoption Center in New York City. Aside from easily fitting in a carrier for a subway ride, their small size is ideal for living in compact apartments.

Gail adds: “We are glad to be given this opportunity to help New Yorkers get the small dogs they want, and at the same time, help find loving homes for San Francisco’s homeless animals.”

Operation Chihuahua In Effect – Video

The dogs will be available for viewing at the ASPCA Adoption Center on Wednesday, January 13, between the hours of noon and 7:00 P.M. Adoption fees will range from $75 to $200, and include all medical and behavioral treatments, vaccinations, spay/neuter surgery and a microchip.

For additional information, please visit ASPCA.org or call our special “Operation Chihuahua” hotline at (212) 876-7700, ext. 3210.

Related:

Homeless California Chihuahuas Being Flown Out of State

California Shelters Overflowing With Chihuahuas

Shelters Full of Chihuahuas

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

Adopt Just One More Pet… MV Shelter Reduces Cat and Kitten Adoption Fees …

Where there is a will…

Homeless With Pets… Choosing Pets Over Shelter

Foreclosure Crisis Leads to More Homeless Pets to Rescue

January 9, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Memorable Pet Adoption Stories from 2009 – ASPCA

Each year, millions of fabulous cats and dogs, through no fault of their own, wind up in shelters across the country. Their background stories vary as widely as the animals themselves: Some are abandoned by their owners, while far too many more are removed by authorities from cruel or abusive situations. Others fall victim to a family death, or a move—and some simply wander away from home and become lost. Regardless of how they get there, your support enables shelters to offer these hard-luck pets a second chance at a happy life.
Thanks to you, the ASPCA Adoption Center, Mobile Adoption Center and our Partner Community Shelters across the nation were able to find new forever homes for tens of thousands of companion animals in need. Since it’s these happy endings that help keep us going, we would love to share with you a few of this year’s most memorable adoption successes—and to thank you again for the impact your generosity has had on these animals’ lives.
Salty Skylar Duff Tulip Smoke
Salty Skylar Duff Tulip Smoke
Poppy Seed Mikey Bonnie George Cricket
Poppy Seed Mikey Bonnie George Cricket

January 1, 2010 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Owner's Rights, responsible pet ownership, Success Stories, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

California Shelters Overflowing with Chihuahuas

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Reuters/Landov

The young woman was very specific: She wanted a Chihuahua, “just like Tinkerbell,” the petite pet of Paris Hilton. She waited weeks, coming back often to look at the dogs in this Southern California animal shelter. So, when “Teensy” a 1-year-old Chihuahua was recently surrendered by her owners, she signed the adoption papers and popped the pooch straight into her purse.

Unfortunately, she was back three weeks later. The dog had pooped in her bag, run into traffic and barked a lot. “Like so many people who got these little dogs because celebrities have them, she wasn’t prepared for the reality of taking care of her,” the shelter’s director tells PEOPLEPets.com.

California is in the midst of a Chihuahua explosion with animal shelters and rescue operations jammed with tiny little dogs like Teensy. In L.A. the situation was so dire, that Katherine Heigl helped get 25 of the pocket-sized pups airlifted to New Hampshire, where they were adopted immediately. A third of the canines in the San Francisco city shelters are Chihuahuas and in Oakland the population has reached a whopping 50 percent. Experts say those numbers are unprecedented.

The Chihuahua glut started about three years ago, according to Nancy Goodwin, director of the City of Laguna Beach Animal Shelter. “Breeds get popular and then when times get tough, we’ll see an influx of them given up. Years ago it was German shepherds,” she says. “Now it’s the little dogs.”

In the last few years a lot of younger people are coming into the shelters looking for the tiny pups. “They tell us they want to carry the dogs in their purses just like the celebrities,” says Goodwin. “And sometimes that’s not as much fun as it looks. They are a responsibility.”

Blame it on Paris. Blame it on Taco Bell. But the combination of movies (2001’s Legally Blonde, 2008’s Beverly Hills Chihuahua) and tabloid photos of celebrities toting their pint-size pets in huge purses has resulted in overpopulation, according to Steve Kragenbrink, of the Woods Humane Society in San Luis Obispo.

“Some of this is accidental breeding,” says Kragenbrink. “Some of it is people trying to make money by breeding, which makes for too many of one kind of animal.” The solution is to spay and neuter pets. “There’s no reason for a dog not to be fixed,” says Kragenbrink, who’s taken Chihuahuas from L.A. shelters to his location for adoption. “The alternative to spaying and neutering is euthanasia. That’s a cruel and unnecessary solution to overpopulation.”

If you’re interested in adding a pet to your family, consider adopting or fostering a Chihuahua. For more information click here.

Related:  Shelters Full of Chihuahuas

Posted:  Just One More Pet

December 28, 2009 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Rescues, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pets, Political Change, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | 3 Comments