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BLM… Bureau of Land Management, Confirms It Killed Six of Bundy’s Cattle

The Bureau of Land Management is confirming it killed six cattle as part of its standoff against the Bundy Ranch in Bunkersville, NV.

Breitbart.com: “A total of six cattle died or were euthanized,” a BLM official told Breitbart News. (We would venture to guess that it turns out to be a lot more than 6!)

The official listed the dead livestock cataloged by the BLM explaining, “The Bundy branded bull that was euthanized posed a significant threat to employees during the gather. The Bundy branded cow ran into a fence panel injuring its spine and was euthanized.” The dead animals listed by the official were:

  • 1 Bundy branded bull was euthanized
  • 1 Bundy branded cow was euthanized
  • 1 unbranded bull was euthanized
  • 1 unbranded cow was euthanized
  • 1 unbranded bull died
  • 1 unbranded cow died

According to the BLM, the gather was based on recent court orders. “Most recently, in 2013, in two separate orders, the U.S. District Court of Nevada directed Mr. Bundy to remove his cattle within 45 days, and authorized the United States to impound his cattle,” said the official.

The Bundy Ranch Facebook page, run by Bundy’s daughter Bailey Bundy Logue, posted photos of dead cattle from a mass grave, which they say belong to the Bundy Ranch, a few days after the BLM impoundment and called the agency’s actions “unjust.” The Bundy Ranch claim the cows and bulls were either “run to death” or shot.

The People for Ethical Treatment of Animals weighed in on the situation as well telling Breitbart News in a statement, “These animals shouldn’t be killed either by the government, or by the rancher who plans to send the cows off to slaughter. The best thing anyone can do to stop the suffering of animals is to go vegan.”

The Bundy family has refused to stop allowing their cattle to graze on federally-owned land, saying the federal government does not have any authority over them. The impasse led to a tense standoff last-week in which both federal agents and Bundy supporters had sniper rifles trained on each others. The government ultimately backed down, at least for now.

Related:

Putin Gets the Best of Obama… Again – Updated 

The Right Picture (Graphic) Is Worth More Than a 1000 Words

Video: OK Militia of 50,000 Stands Beside Bundy Ranch Against the Feds

Bundy Family Members Appear With Greta on ‘On the Record’ Discussing New Evidence That Feds Killed Their Cattle (Video)

The Western States: A Return To Sovereignty

Wildlands Project, Agenda 21, and its Future Enforcers (hardly just the Bundy Ranch)

Did Feds Kill Bundy Rancher Cattle, Destory Water Tanks and Run Over Tortoise Dens?

Senator Harry Reid: the Cattle Rustler

Statists Call For Drone Strike on Bundy Supporters

Diamond Bar Ranch in NM Seized by US Forest Service

AGENDA 21 – THE FOUR PART PROCESS

Did Reid postpone Bundy ranch seizure until after 2016 elections?

Plot Behind Bundy Ranch Showdown Thickens

BLM Whistleblower Reveals Financial Motive Behind Bundy Ranch Raid

Alert: BLM committed animal atrocities, shot cows from helicopters, constructed mass graves at Bundy Ranch

BLM Rounding Up Wild Horses, Sending To Slaughterhouse In Canada

April 23, 2014 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Stop Animal Cruelty, Unusual Stories | 2 Comments

April 23rd is National Lost Dog Awareness Day

BunnyJeanCook: On April 23, the U.S. will celebrate its first annual National Lost Dog Awareness Day (NLDAD). Created by Susan Taney and Kathy Pobloskie – directors of Lost Dogs Illinois and Lost Dogs of Wisconsin – the canine-centric holiday aims to bring attention to all dogs that are lost each year. On a happier note, NLDAD also celebrates the thousands of lost dogs successfully reunited with their families.

The Lost Dogs of America (LDOA) website was created and is maintained by the two original founding members of the Lost Dogs network: Lost Dogs of Wisconsin and Lost Dogs Illinois. The Lost Dogs mission has been so successful that the concept has been accepted and put into practice in Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, New Jersey, Minnesota, Texas, and Wisconsin under the umbrella organization Lost Dogs of America.

Lost Dogs of America is an all-volunteer organization founded for the exclusive purpose of providing help to reunite families with their lost dogs. With the help of popular social media platforms, Facebook and Twitter, and their extensive connections throughout each state, the chapters are able to facilitate a statewide alert as soon as a lost or found dog report is received.

By working to recover lost dogs, LDOA helps to decrease the number of homeless animals brought into shelters and animal control facilities, thereby preventing unnecessary euthanasia. Lost Dogs of America offers an invaluable service when many feel helpless otherwise.

The tenacious efforts of these combined volunteers along with over 150,000 fans have helped reunite over 21,000 dogs with their families since 2010. Getting lost dogs back home reduces stress on owners, staff at shelters/animal control facilities, other dogs in the facilities, and ultimately saves taxpayers money. It also opens up kennel space for truly homeless dogs.

“When a dog goes missing, most owners do not know how or where to begin looking. Our specially-trained volunteers make them a flyer to distribute and offer helpful support and advice tailored to their situation and locale. We also constantly remind the public that not all stray dogs are homeless and that there is likely an owner looking for a dog that has been found” explains Pobloskie.

“One of our recent success stories was a lab mix named Abner. He was missing nine weeks during really bad weather. We never gave up, and neither did Abner’s owner. She read the articles on our website and followed the advice of her caseworker. Abner was successfully lured into the home of some kind Good Samaritans who patiently gained his trust. Never doubt a dog’s ability to survive.”

If you are interested in starting an organization in your state, please visit the Lost Dogs of America website at www.lostdogsofamerica.org

Sources: prlog.org and lostdogsofamerica.org
Image via lostdogsofamerica.org

April 23, 2014 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | 1 Comment

Hayden Law Repeal Bad News for CA Shelter Animals

UPDATE: On April 11 the California Senate budget subcommittee voted unanimously not to repeal certain provisions of the Hayden Law, just as the Assembly budget subcommittee did on March 13.

ilovedogs.com: While this is good news, the provisions could still be repealed. The next step is for the Assembly and Senate budget committees to review the subcommittees’ reports and vote on their versions of the budget bill.

California pet parents should therefore continue to spread the word, sign the petition and let their legislators know how they feel.

sad dog in animal shelterWhen the Hayden Law was passed in 1998, it provided California shelter animals with protections including a holding period of four to six business days.

But now these protections are in danger of disappearing. To save the state what he says is $46 million annually (California currently faces a $9.2 billion deficit), Gov. Jerry Brown is considering repealing provisions of the Hayden Law, which means shelter animals could be euthanized after only 72 hours.

The three-day holding period would apply whether or not the shelter is open for business. As Francis Battista, co-founder of the Best Friends Animal Society, told NBC Los Angeles, “You could go away on Friday, your dog could get out. It’s a long weekend and you don’t get back until Tuesday and by then your dog is dead. Three days is not a long time to reclaim your animal.”

The short holding period could result in less-adoptable pets, like senior dogs or dogs with health issues, being euthanized before they could be given a second chance by a rescue group or potential adopter. The 72-hour timeframe would make it difficult for rescues to arrange saving even young, healthy dogs.

“When we decide to save an animal, people don’t realize the time it takes to get a plan together,” Haze Lynn, founder of Take Me Home Rescue, told NBC Los Angeles. “By killing quickly, we won’t be able to save anybody. This is a big problem for us because we need the time.”

Not only would the repeal reduce the holding period, it would allow shelters to immediately euthanize rabbits, pot-bellied pigs, turtles, hamsters and other pets.

Also eliminated would be the requirement for shelters to provide sick or injured animals with veterinary care; to provide records of their animals; or to post lists of lost and found pets.

Back in 2004, when then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger was considering repealing the same provisions, the public outcry helped influence him to change his mind. Now Brown is facing a similar backlash.

Most animal welfare groups, among them the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), ASPCA, Best Friends Animal Society and Stray Cat Alliance, oppose the repeal.

More than 56,000 people have signed a Change.org petition started by attorney Marla Tauscher that asks Brown not to repeal any provisions of the Hayden Law. The Best Friends Animal Society is organizing a rally in Sacramento tomorrow, March 13, the day state budget subcommittee hearings begin. People are urged to spread awareness of the possible repeal via their social networks.

The law’s creator and namesake, former state Sen. Tom Hayden, appears in a video urging Brown not to repeal his law.

“I wrote the legislation because I learned that 65,000 animals were put to death unnecessarily every year in Los Angeles County, and it was meant to avoid that from ever happening to another stray animal and their family,” he says in the video.

“It’s not a budget issue, because you can solve the problem with penalties or fees. It is a humane issue, and I urge you to look at your dog before you allow this bill which protects animals to die.”

The dog Hayden is referring to is Sutter, Brown’s 8-year-old Pembroke Welsh Corgi, who often accompanies his dog dad to government meetings. Sutter has even sat at the table during budget hearings.

A major argument for not letting the Hayden Law die is that it has actually been suspended since 2009 – meaning that for the past three years, the state has not paid municipal shelters to hold animals beyond 72 hours or provide animals with veterinary care. (Many shelters continue to do so anyway by relying on city or county funds.) Animal advocates say the law should continue to be suspended instead of permanently repealed so that when the economy recovers, the state can start compensating the shelters again.

“Since these requirements are already suspended, the Governor’s repeal proposal is a policy decision, not a budget decision,” said Jennifer Fearing, California’s senior director for the HSUS, in a statement. “And the policy consequences of repeal are likely to be adverse for homeless animals’ prospects – indeed repeal cannot possibly move California forward.”

In defense of the repeal, the Brown administration says that local governments, not the state, should decide on the holding time for shelter animals.

But Taimie L. Bryant, a UCLA law professor who specializes in animal law, disagrees. She told Sutter’s Friends, a Facebook group opposed to the repeal, “The Hayden Law established a few modest provisions that should be in place at the state level as a minimum standard of decent animal sheltering … We need consistency across jurisdictions on basic aspects of animal sheltering.”

There is also a misconception that the state pays shelters to euthanize animals. H.D. Palmer, a spokesman for the California Dept. of Finance, told KABC-TV, “So those local governments who are actually putting down more animals get more money from the state. That seems to be somewhat of a perverse fiscal incentive.”

Social Compassion in Legislation (SCIL), a nonprofit whose mission is to reduce pet overpopulation through legislation, clarifies the reimbursement formula on its website:

“The reimbursement formula does not create a perverse incentive to kill animals. Shelters’ financial incentives are always aligned with saving lives because they can bring in revenues from adoption and owner redemption and will be spared the costs of killing (which are not reimbursed by the state). If they hold and kill, they will only get the small difference in excess of 72 hours reimbursed by the state. They will not get from the state the costs of killing or the foregone money from adoptions and owner redemptions.”

Thanks in part to the Hayden Law, California has been at the forefront of shelter reform across the U.S.

“Once the law is gone, the reference point for other shelters to follow is also gone,” Battista told NBC Los Angeles.

What You Can Do:

  • Help spread awareness of the possible repeal on your social networks. Tell Brown you oppose it on his Facebook and Twitter accounts.
  • Sign the Change.org petition urging Brown not to repeal provisions of the law.
  • Call Brown at 916-445-2841 or send a fax to 916-558-3160.
  • Attend the rally starting at 11:30 a.m. tomorrow, March 13, at the California State Capitol in Sacramento.

PHOTO: Nhandler

April 23, 2014 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization | 1 Comment