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Women sue Petco Kaneohe claiming groomers cut off their dogs’ body parts… and then Trying to glue ears back on

Video:  Two Hawaiian Women Sue Petco… Claiming Groomers Cut Off Their Dog’s Body Parts

Groomer Cuts Dogs Ear OffJust a trim, thanks.

Two Hawaii animal owners are suing a local Petco location, claiming that groomers at the pet shop mutilated their dogs and, in one case, tried to cover up the hack job using glue, HawaiiNewsNow reports.

Last July, Gladys Kapuwai took her Pomeranian-Maltese mix to the Kaneohe Petco for routine grooming, but when the grandmother retrieved "Dodo," she noticed that the puppy was missing a piece of her ear.

"[She] was dried, bloody, was dry blood, everything," Kapuwai told the website. "I noticed that at home, so when I took her to the vet, the doctor had told me it looked like they tried to glue it back."

In another case, Estelle Green, the wife of attorney Michael Green, who is prosecuting both cases, picked up her dog to find that the pup’s nails were cut too short and bleeding, according to the Star Advertiser.

"The dog was filthy and the tip of the dog’s tail was cut off," Michael Green added.

"My dog, they offered another free grooming," Green also told HawaiiNewsNow. "I guess they wanted to take off other body parts."

I find this exceptionally disturbing because something similar happened to my friend at PetSmart in Ohio…

See:  Bailey’s Not So Good Trip to the Groomer (below)

Attached are some pictures of Bailey, our Yorkie.

Jean's Yorkie Bailey 3

Fall 2008

Jean's Yorkie Bailey

Baily and Maggie, part Shih Tzu and part Lab in fall 2010

We usually take Bailey for grooming about every 8 weeks or so. Otherwise his hair gets matted. In the winter, the snow gets packed in his fur and it becomes ice balls.

We took Bailey to PetSmart today to be groomed. On the way home from the groomer, he kept rubbing his right eye. He seemed to be squinting too.

Jean's Yorkie Bailey 2

Bailey… Don’t I look cute after being groomed?

He kept getting worse, so I called PetSmart and asked if anything had happened during the grooming session. They thought perhaps a hair had gotten in his eye. I also called our regular vet to see if he could be seen tomorrow, but they were booked.
PetSmart offered that we could come in and they would flush his eye.

We took him into PetSmart before 5pm to get the eye flushed. He laid down for a while and by 6pm his eye was swollen shut.

I called Pet Smart again and asked if there was anything they could do. They talked to the vet that they have in the store and told us to come ASAP before the vet closed.

The vet did a test and it showed that they had clipped his eye with the razor.

The vet said they call it an ulcer of the eye in this situation. The test consisted of putting a drop of solution in Bailey’s eye and then checking under a blue light to see if the eye turned green, meaning he had been clipped. His entire eye turned green, but the vet said the good thing was that the cut wasn’t very deep.

Poor little guy. We have some medicine to put in his Bailey’s eye and he has to wear one of those collars for a week. We have an appointment to re-check it after a week.

“He’s gonna be alright, but it was a surprise to find out that these things do happen. Who would think that taking your pet to the groomer could be so dangerous?”

PetSmart is picking up the bill for the vet.

Jean~

Good for PetSmart for stepping up to pay for the vet, but you have to wonder why the groomer wouldn’t have noticed that they clipped Bailey’s eye or at least that something was wrong and then have it checked by the in-house vet before sending him home?!?

My niece was a manager of one of PetSmart’s grooming salons and overall they do a good job, especially for a mega-chain, but accidents do happen and each facility and its management and staff is different. And taking your pet to a more expensive or high end salon does not mean they will be any better or that your pet will be any safer or better groomed!

It certainly is a reminder that we need to be vigilant and pay attention!!

h/t to Jean Stoner for sharing her and Bailey’s story

The moral here is stay at the store when your pet is being groomed.  Watch through the window or at least check in now and then.  And check your dog before you leave.  This does not seem to be as rare as we all would like to think.  And if it happens to you… your pet, stand-up and demand fair treatment.  Demand they pay medical bills now and in the future and any other compensation you feel is fair… and get it all in writing!  This negligence that causes pain and suffering to animals and their owners is just wrong!

February 15, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , | 2 Comments

Londonderry School Uses Therapy Dog in Classroom

Southern New Hampshire Montessori Academy (SNHMA) has become one of the first schools in New England to bring in a therapy dog as a full time member of its community. Guardian, a Portuguese water dog, was chosen for his temperament, his silky soft hypoallergenic coat and teddy bear looks. While he’s in the process of completing his year-long training, Guardian is already having a positive impact in the classroom, where he is charged with being a calm, emphatic and steadfast best friend for little boys and girls.

Loundary School 1

“While school therapy dogs are still currently regarded as a cutting-edge educational tool, research is showing that dogs in the classroom can play a huge role in boosting students’ happiness, calmness, overall emotional well-being, and ability to learn,” explains Debra Hogan SNHMA’s Founder and Head of School.

Loundary School 2Guardian, who is always here to greet student with a wag and a lick in the mornings, has helped the younger pre-K students with separation anxiety as their parents drop them off in the morning. “He is happy to see the children come in in the mornings and offers a welcome huggable friend to little ones who are finding it hard to see Mom and Dad go,” says Hogan.

Guardian is also helping first graders hone in their reading skills, as Ms. Hogan explains: “Dogs are perfect listeners. They are not judgmental; they don’t care if you don’t get the words exactly right, and for most children, practicing reading aloud is all they need to become fluent readers.”

“Therapy dogs can have a positive impact on every aspect of the classroom from lessons planning, to teaching social skills and responsibility, to comforting students in a time of grief or personal crisis. They teach, they listen, they are unconditional friends. I have seen children who had attention deficit disorder become calmer. I have seen children with emotional difficulties lie down beside the dog and whisper things in his ear, things they’d never tell an adult, and then rise up ready to learn. Their self esteem really soared,” says Terri Hamilton, an Elementary Guidance Consultant and Parent-Child Connection Advocate.

Loundary School 3

Images courtesy of Tanya Swann Photography.

Southern New Hampshire Montessori Academy offers an academically focused education to children through an integrated curriculum. Concentration is given to educating the “whole child” (all facets of the child’s being, including: intellectual, physical, emotional, social and creative aspects) with a strong emphasis of hands-on and experiential learning where children develop their passion in technology, science, visual and performing arts, foreign language and physical education. Complementing a strong academic core, the school offers an enrichment program that includes elementary Latin, creative arts (visual and performing), daily physical education, technology and Spanish. For further information, please visit their website.

Source:  Londonderry News

February 15, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, We Are All God's Creatures, Working and Military Dogs and Related | , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Valentine’s Day Do’s and Don’ts for Pet Lovers with Videos and Photos

Video:  Valentine’s Day Pets

Video: Valentine’s Day: The Love of Animals

By Dr. Becker

Many pet owners include their furry loved ones in Valentine’s Day celebrations.

And who better to celebrate on St. Valentine’s Day than the one devoted soul in your life who offers true unconditional love?

Valentine’s Day Do’s

If you’d like to do something special for your four-legged companion on February 14th, here are a few neat ideas:

  • Make an appointment to have professional photos taken of your pet, or hire an artist to paint a portrait of your dog, cat, or other favorite critter.
  • Make a permanent clay print of your pet’s paw with a special kit.
  • If your dog has a favorite activity like riding in the car, hiking a trail with you, or retrieving a tennis ball over and over and over (and over), carve out a couple hours on or around Valentine’s Day and indulge him.
  • Skip the heart-shaped carb-heavy pet treats and invest the money instead in a small amount of an excellent quality raw, canned or dehydrated dog or cat food.
  • Set aside 15 minutes to a half hour and give your animal companion your undivided attention. Don’t multi-task during this small window of time. Allow no interruptions. Do nothing but focus on your pet. Soak up her animal energy.
    You can spend the time just petting or massaging your pet, bathing or grooming her, or doing an
    at-home wellness exam. You can take your dog for a short, invigorating walk. Engage your kitty with her favorite toy. Chat with your bird. Set your pocket pet free to investigate a bit of the world outside her cage.

…and a Few Don’ts

Human celebrations of Valentine’s Day tend to involve things that can be harmful to pets, including potentially toxic flower and plant arrangements, chocolate, wine or other adult beverages, and candlelit dinners.

  • If you’re thinking of buying a plant or flower arrangement for your pet-owning sweetie, check the list of toxic plants for animals, or visit the ASPCA.org for their list of both toxic and non-toxic plants.
  • If candy is on your V Day shopping list, keep in mind chocolate is toxic to both cats and dogs. And the darker the chocolate, the more toxic.
    Chocolate contains a caffeine-like stimulant substance that when ingested by your pet can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, racing pulse and seizures. Also, the fat content in chocolate can wreak havoc with a pet’s pancreas.
  • Needless to say, any sort of alcoholic beverage is dangerous for pets. And it doesn’t take more than a tiny bit to bring on vomiting, diarrhea, loss of coordination, central nervous system depression, tremors, breathing difficulties and coma.
  • If dinner by candlelight is on the agenda for Valentine’s Day, be sure to keep the flames well out of the reach of curious pets. And safely extinguish burning candles before you leave a room.

Here’s wishing you and your loved one(s) (on two legs or four), a warm, safe and wonderful Valentine’s Day!

 

Our Gang

bestbuddies_thumb3rd B-Day Angelina & Princess 061

Angel and Apachi (Valentine’s Day 2007)      -     Princess Giving Tim a Big Hug and Kiss

3rd B-Day Angelina & Princess 057angelina-worried-about-her-dads-bandaged-foot-05-01-10_thumb

Mama Angel and Angelina hugging before Game time    -    Papa Apachi and Angelina Sunning Themselves

Angel and Apachi Sharing a Nap in Tim’s Chair     -    Angelina and Princess Hugging as Pups

‘Until One Has Loved an Animal, Part of Their Sour Remains Unawakened’

 

The World’s Most Unusual Valentines Went to the Dogs

Help Chained Dogs This Valentine’s Day… and Every Day!

Animal amore! The creatures that show it’s not only humans who like to get up close and personal on Valentine’s Day

February 14, 2012 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets | , , , , | 2 Comments

Mini-Yorkie stomped to death protecting owner

Police are looking for several men who stomped to death a 4-pound mini-Yorkshire terrier that was trying to protect its owner from an attack in San Jose over the weekend, authorities said Monday.

The dog’s owner said he was walking the 6-year-old dog, Shadow, at Winchester Boulevard and Colonial Way about 2 p.m. Saturday when three men approached and asked if he was a gang member.

The owner, a 32-year-old floor installer who asked that his name be withheld for safety reasons, said he had denied gang involvement, but the men attacked him anyway.

The owner said he had tried to run with his dog but tripped, and the men began kicking and hitting him. He heard the small dog barking and trying to protect him.

The men beat him for about a minute. Once they ran off, the man said, he looked at his dog and "just saw a big puddle of blood."

The dog died on the way to a veterinary hospital, he said.

"He wasn’t making too many noises, but I could see his eyes and that’s when I broke down," he said. "They were still blinking a little bit, but so much blood was leaking out of him. I knew the moment he died in my arms. I heard him take his last breath and just kept thinking, ‘There’s no way this is happening.’ "

Capt. Jay Terrado of the San Jose Animal Care and Services agency said necropsy reports showed that Shadow died of head trauma and suffered injuries "consistent with being stomped and kicked."

"You can imagine the type of damage a full-grown adult can do to a small dog," Terrado said.

Witnesses told police that the men had been waving signs for a nearby car wash before the attack, Terrado said. The car wash was a fundraiser for the family of Ramon Ruano, a 20-year-old who was shot and killed Feb. 5.

Terrado said investigators were looking at all possible motives, not just a gang attack.

The owner said he had been wearing a red sweater and a red Boston Red Sox hat, which may have been a rival gang’s colors, but that he is not part of any gang.

"I’ve lived at my place for six years, and I’ve never had any problems," he said. "I’ve known that there were gangs around here, but come on – you see me walking a little mini-Yorkie down the street, you’re not going to think, ‘Oh hey, look at this guy.’ "

He took care of Shadow since he was a puppy, he said. He named him Shadow because the small dog followed him everywhere – "he was my shadow."

"He was so small," he said. "He was just a little baby dog. I can’t believe it."

Vivian Ho is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. vho@sfchronicle.com.

This article appeared on page C – 3 of the San Francisco Chronicle

In my book, there us no punishment harsh enough for these horrible men!

February 14, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, We Are All God's Creatures | , , | Leave a comment

Update on TV Anchor Bitten by Rescued Dog During Live Broadcast and Max the Dog Who Bit Her

    KUSA Reports: Max, the Dog Who Bit Anchor Kyle Dyer ‘Most Likely’ Will Not Be Put Down I say thank goodness and animals lovers, lets make sure he is not but down.  This poor dog was first traumatized falling into the icy water, went through a rescue and then was paraded around on TV on a set that probably made him nervous. 

    I feel great sympathy for Kyle Dyer, who has gone through reconstructive surgery, and my prayers are with her for a full recovery, but common sense dictates that you don’t put your face against the face of a dog you hardly know, especially one that has been traumatized.

    KUSA sent reporter Chris Vanderveen to the Denver Animal Shelter on Thursday to check up on Max, short for "Gladiator Maximus", the 85-pound Argentine Mastiff that bit anchor Kyle Dyer. The dog is currently under quarantine following the on-air bite.

    In a story that lead KUSA’s evening newscasts on Thursday, the shelter’s director told Vanderveen that Max will “most likely” not be put down.

    “One of the things that Max has going for him is that it appears that this is his first bite,” the shelter’s director, Doug Kelley, said.

    Recounting the incident in his story, Vanderveen emphasized the potentially stressful circumstances surrounding the bite (it was less than 24 hours after Max was rescued from icy waters and occurred under bright studio lights) as well as the fact that Dyer got “close, really close” to the dog.

    Max is currently under a 10-day quarantine. His fate will be decided at the end of the quarantine period.

    Max’s owner released the following statement on Thursday:

    The past two days have been incredibly difficult for our family. We are truly saddened that Kyle Dyer of 9NEWs was injured during a celebratory interview following Max’s rescue. Our family and friends pray for a quick recovery and look forward to seeing Ms. Dyer back on-air soon.

    The only reason we agreed to do the interview following Max’s rescue was to show how truly grateful we are for the life-saving rescue of Max by Tyler Sugaski and the crew from Lakewood Fire Department Station No. 12.

    There’s been a tremendous amount of interest in Max’s story. However, there has been some misinformation reported by some news media and on the Internet about Max.

    For the record, Max is current in his vaccinations. Max has no history of aggression. Max is a gentle, loving, family dog. Max is well mannered and obedient and he hardly barks. This incident truly is unfortunate and does not reflect Max’s disposition towards people.

    (Full statement here).

    Denver TV Anchor Kyle Dyer Bitten by Rescued Dog During Live Broadcast

    Denver TV news anchor Kyle Dyer was bitten by a dog during a live broadcast Wednesday morning. (Image source: YouTube)

    Editor’s note: the video below has been updated.

    A Denver television news anchor was injured Wednesday after she was bitten in the face by a dog during a live broadcast.

    Kyle Dyer of Denver’s 9NEWS was conducting an interview about the rescue of Max, an 85-pound mastiff that fell through an icy lake Tuesday while chasing a coyote, the Denver Post reported. Firefighter Tyler Sugaski, secured by a life line, put on a wetsuit and ventured onto the ice to pull the dog to safety in the dramatic rescue.

    Denver TV Anchor Kyle Dyer Bitten by Rescued Dog During Live Broadcast

    Kyle Dyer (Image source: Denver Post)

    The dog, its owner and Sugaski were all in the studio for a follow-up interview Wednesday morning when the dog lunged and bit Dyer during the live segment. In a video of the incident, Dyer gasps and quickly turns away from the dog, saying “Oh my God!” as the broadcast cuts away to Dyer’s co-anchor, who looks shocked.

    “There was an incident during 9NEWS today. Kyle Dyer was bit in the face by a dog. She is getting medical attention due to the injury. As soon as we know the extent of Kyle’s injury, we will update you on her condition. Thanks everyone for the concerns/well-wishes,” a message posted on the station’s Facebook page said.

    Co-anchor Gary Shapiro wrote on his own Facebook page that the dog is “being detained by animal control while they investigate the incident,” according to the Post.

    “So you may have seen Kyle get bit by the dog in the 7 a.m. hour. All we know for sure is that he got her on the lip, and she’s being treated for the injury at the hospital,” Shapiro wrote. “We think she’s going to be OK, she was talking when she left.”

    In another Facebook post, Brooke Thacker, a morning reporter for the station, wrote: “We fortunately had a firefighter who was already here and he’s taking care of her.”

    Video: Dog bites television anchor

    Update: Dyer is awake and visiting with family in the hospital, a news release from the Denver Health Medical Center said.

    Here’s the video of the dog getting rescued from the lake:

    Raw Video:  Dog Rescued From Icy Colorado Water

    Whether it is a teacup Chihuahua a Pit Bull or a Mastiff… or any animal for that matter, they get nervous under stressful situations and Max had been in 2-days of non-stop stress and trauma.  Why would we even consider putting this good dog down because we, the humans, made bad decisions.  Please call, email and write in on Max’s behalf!

    February 13, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

    The Ultimate Talking Dog Tease

     

    Video:  The Ultimate Talking Dog Tease

    February 11, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, pet fun | , | 1 Comment

    (CSI Poop Police) DNA Test Helps Enforce Pet Clean Up Policy… You Gotta Be Kidding Me?!?

    Photobucket

    SAN DIEGO – The same DNA technology that has solved cold case murders is now being used to crack down on a whole new class of criminals: dog owners who don’t clean up after their pets.

    "Unfortunately, people leave surprises in my yard, but I always carry plastic bags, so I can clean up those surprises," said dog owner Ted Stevens.

    Now, BioPet Vet Lab ,a company in Knoxville, Tenn., has developed technology that is says can identify the dogs that leave unwelcome calling cards on neighborhood lawns. The system, called Pooprints, can help communities manage and enforce a pet clean up policy, according to company officials.

    Here’s how it works in an apartment complex or condominium community: The property management company or homeowners association builds a DNA database by collecting cheek swabs from the dogs that live in the community. When doggie dung turns up unexpectedly, the affected resident can send a small sample to a lab. DNA testing reveals the identity of the canine culprit.

    It sounds quite effective and a bit draconian.

    "It seems a little hard core to me, but I guess some are rather offended by that," said Donna Deatrick. "It’s a big issue. We take care of our lawns here. We don’t want to walk out and look at nasty, smelly, dog droppings."

    Eric Mayer, the director of business development for BioPet Vet Lab, says dog doo is more than just a nuisance. The dog population has exploded in this country, he said. Each dog creates 275 pounds of waste every year, and 40 percent of that stays on the ground. Twenty percent of contamination in waterways can be traced back to doggie dumpings, Mayer said.

    "It’s just rude. I walk my dogs and carry bags. It’s not that big of a deal really. If it’s your dog, you should clean up after it," said veterinarian Dr. Farley.

    Photobucket

    Bosco spends his weekends doing probation for his offending lawn deposits …

    And if this does not work… They will be sending in the drones!

    European Union Considers Drones to Monitor Farmland for Violations

    February 10, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , | 2 Comments

    Can I Come Sleep at Your House

    image

    February 10, 2012 Posted by | Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets | , | Leave a comment

    Banning Dogs as Pets

    This is how it happens, folks. Little by little. Law by law. The proponents of sharia get themselves elected to positions of power – and then, before too long, they start trying to subject the rest of us to it, bit by bit:

    Hasan Küçük, Hague councilor for the Islam Democrats, says dogs should be banned as pets in the city, reports De Telegraaf. The Muslim party says that the animals belong in nature, not inside the house. Küçük says that keeping dogs is animal abuse and should therefore be criminalized.

    Needless to say, Hasan Küçük’s concerns have nothing whatsoever to do with animal abuse – and everything to do with the fact that Islam considers dogs to be impure. Like women, Jews, and gays, dogs are on the front line of the confrontation in the West between sharia-observant Muslims and the rest of us. When you see Muslims making trouble over dogs, you can bet that it’s just the beginning of all kinds of trouble over all kinds of things that run afoul of Islamic religious law.

    To be sure, Küçük’s suggestion – which came in response to a proposal by animal-rights advocates that The Hague be made more dog-friendly – was immediately shot down by other members of the city council. Küçük was undoubtedly not surprised. He knows these things don’t change in a day – they change over time, by a gradual process of wearing down. People like Küçük are exceedingly patient. And they trust in their own patience and intransigence – and in our weakness, our distraction, our readiness to give in, eventually, under steady pressure, on what may seem to us like small matters that are not worth fighting over.

    Küçük’s proposal is nothing new. For years now, the Western media have featured, with some frequency, news stories about blind people with guide dogs being refused taxi rides by devout Muslims cabdrivers, being thrown off buses because of complaints by Muslim passengers, or being refused access to stores by devout Muslim shopkeepers. Daniel Pipes has been assiduous in cataloging such cases, some of them dating back to the 1990s, in places ranging from Milwaukee to Melbourne.

    The Muslims in these cases invariably argue that their religion commands them not to be around dogs. But it’s not just about dogs but about pretty much every little detail of daily life. The same people who object fiercely to the presence of dogs in their shops or cabs also maintain that their religion commands them not to do, or touch, or say, or see, or be in the vicinity of a great variety of things that are commonplace in the Western world. And once they’ve gotten their way with regard to dogs, they’ll move on to another thing – and then another, and another – at which they take offense, and once again spell out exactly how they expect non-Muslims to change their behavior in order to keep the peace.

    It’s the logic of conquerors. But many authorities in the West have bowed to it. In British Columbia, cab drivers whose “honest religious belief…precludes them from transporting certified guide dogs” have been exempted from having to do so. The Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport has alsoworked out a “compromise” between blind people and Muslim cabbies. In Britain, in response to Muslim complaints about “sniffer dogs” used to identify terrorists at airports, authorities limited the dogs’ activities out of “cultural sensitivity.” When sniffer dogs are taken into mosques or Muslim homes, moreover, they’re fitted with “leather bootees” to avoid giving offense.

    Generally speaking, as the Muslim percentage of a city’s population climbs, the demands for appeasement grow more and more aggressive. Last year,reports Soeren Kern, Islamic groups in the Catalan city of Lérida – which is 20% Muslim – called for a ban on dogs on public transport and in certain public spaces on the grounds that their presence violates Muslims’ “religious freedom and their right to live according to Islamic principles.” The city’s refusal to introduce such a ban was succeeded by a series of dog poisonings. No surprise there: this is precisely the kind of development that one can expect after a certain point in this process, when demands and pressure haven’t turned the trick.

    To treat Muslims’ complaints about dogs as if they deserve serious and respectful consideration is, of course, absurd. But over time, even the absurd becomes familiar. That’s one thing these people are counting on. They’re counting on their ability to wear the rest of us down gradually, accustoming us to ideas, beliefs, and “sensitivities” that, at first blush, strike us as ridiculous. They’re counting on our ultimate willingness to compromise our values, one by one, out of fear of conflict and a misguided ardor for social harmony. They’re counting on our readiness to tell ourselves that we’re not surrendering or being submissive but are simply being good, respectful, cooperative neighbors.

    It’s precisely in this way that sharia law is being introduced, step by inexorable step, into the West. The only way to put a halt to it is to ensure that everyone in a position of power in the West is aware of exactly what the Hasan Küçüks among us are up to, and is willing to stand up to them every step of the way – knowing that it’s not about dogs, but about dogma; not about puppies, but about power.

    Freedom Center pamphlets now available on Kindle: Click here.

    Source: FrontPageMag.com

    Related:

    Jihad making Lives “Ruff” for Dogs in Europe; PETA Silent

    Muslims in Spain Declare Jihad on Dogs

    Man’s Best Friend in Shariah’s Cruel Crosshairs

    Dogs… Pets – Beyond Traditional Islam

    The Latest Enemies of Iran: Dogs and Their Owners

    Iran Cleric Says Dogs “Unclean” and Not to be Kept as Pets

    1 Million Stray Dogs in Iraq to be Culled

    Pakistani Blogger Slams Islamic Feast of EID

    Operation Bagdad Pups – No Buddy Gets Left Behind

    First the Greenies Want Us to Eat Our Dogs… Now the Academics Say it is Insulting to Call Them Pets

    Shocking Report… Gov’t to Decide What Pets You Can Own

    February 8, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets | , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

    Puppy Bowl VIII – Who needs the Super Bowl when you have the Puppy Bowl?

    The Puppy Bowl VIII action will begin Sunday, Feb. 5 at 3 p.m. on Animal Planet.

    Photograph by: user: AnimalPlanetTV, YouTube

    The Puppy Bowl VIII action will begin Sunday, Feb. 5 at 3 p.m. on Animal Planet.

    Video: Puppy Bowl VIII Preview

     

    No kickers, just lickers…

    The Puppy bowl is a great tradition for non-Super Bowl fans.

     

    February 6, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , | Leave a comment