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Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Owner of Milo’s Café dies at 42

Published: June 17, 2011  -  Updated: June 18, 2011 5:02 p.m.

By ERIKA I. RITCHIE  -  THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

LAKE FOREST – Scott Sellman, owner of Milo’s Café in Foothill Ranch, has died. He was 42.

According to friends and family, Sellman was in his office at the restaurant doing paperwork when at around 8 p.m. Thursday he said he felt short of breath and dizzy. He leaned back in his chair and collapsed, said Louis Teng, a friend and business adviser, recounting the story of another friend who was in the office with Sellman at the time.

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Scott Selllman loved animals and the friendship they helped spark among people who owned them. He died on Thursday at Milo’s Cafe, the restaurant he opened in March.  -  REPORTED BY ERIKA I. RITCHIE, PHOTO JOSHUA SUDOCK

The friend tried to help Sellman, and when paramedics arrived they administered CPR. Sellman was transported to Saddleback Memorial Medical Center where he was pronounced dead at 9:08 p.m.

Otto Cedeno, Sellman’s bother-in-law said the coroner told them at noon Friday that it appeared as though Sellman had an enlarged heart and died from a heart attack.

Sellman opened Milo’s Café after a yearlong effort to find just the right spot. Initially, he tried to open up at a new center built at Muirlands Boulevard and Ridge Route Drive. Those efforts were stopped by nearby neighbors who complained to the Planning Commission about potential traffic, noise and liability issues that might result from the restaurant and its outdoor play area for dogs.

The Planning Commission ruled against the restaurant for a different issue, noting that the patio would have to be built too close to the intersection. Sellman appealed the ruling to the City Council, which sided with the Planning Commission.

Sellman eventually found the spot in Foothill Ranch when Fuddrucker’s left the shopping center on Rancho Parkway that houses 24 Hour Fitness and the Home Depot. Sellman worked 16-hour days for months to create the restaurant environment he wanted – a dog-friendly eatery where people could get healthy food. His dog Milo, a 2-year-old shar pei-bulldog mix, was the project’s mascot.

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Sellman replaced Fuddrucker’s red carpet with porcelain tile, installed a dog-bone shaped bar and a half dozen 50-inch flat screen TVs. Andy Warhol dog art hangs on the wall, mixed in with family photos and pictures of Sellman’s dogs, Milo and Jake, a pug.

The dogs were the inspiration for the restaurant, Selllman once said. He called the dogs the great ambassadors of friendships between people. Sellman embraced the pet community, holding weekly fundraisers with groups such as Barks of Love, Coastal German Shepherd Rescue, Orange County Bulldog Rescue, Desperate Paws and Friends of Lake Forest Animals.

When the tsunami hit Japan on March 11, Sellman put out a call for donations and gathered several thousand pounds of dog food for Desperate Paws of Orange County, a Newport Beach-based dog club that shipped the food to Japan.

"Scott Sellman was a remarkable man who dedicated his entire restaurant to dogs and to helping our needy dog community," Desperate Paws founders Stephen and Brandi Terry said on Friday. "His dedication to local rescue groups, the Blankets of Love Program, to our Paw It Forward Campaign as well as our pet relief effort for Japan helped benefit dogs and cats greatly. He will be missed and we send our heart felt condolences to his family."

Tiffany Norton, director of Coastal German Shepherd Rescue, said she enjoyed working with Sellman and found his love for rescue dogs to be contagious.

"I knew him as an unselfish, honorable man who deeply wanted to give back to the community," Norton said. "He will be greatly missed by all."

Wendy Rashall, who owns pet-grooming service Furry Best, remembered Sellman’s love for animals.

"There was such a look of pure joy on his face every single time he gazed at his beloved Milo or Jake," said Rashall, who oversees the dogs that play on the restaurant’s patio. "Wherever he is now, I know he is finding comfort and joy surrounded by four-legged creatures that adore him. "

Councilman Scott Voigts regularly visited Sellman at Milo’s Cafe.

"I’m in schock," Voigts said upon hearing the news on Friday. "Over the last few months Scott has become a true friend. He was a wonderful and caring human being. My thoughts and prayers are with his family and those of us that new him."

Sellman’s wife Grace will continue to run Milo’s Café, Cedeno said.

"He believed in his business and helping people," he said. "He believed in charities and wanted to make sure all pets had a home. His vision will continue."

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Contact the writer: 949-454-7307 or eritchie@ocregister.com

Reposted at Just One More Pet

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No Pet Left Behind: The Sherpa Guide for Traveling with Your Best Friend

The Dog Lover’s Companion to California: The Inside Scoop on Where to Take Your Dog (Dog Lover’s Companion Guides)

Travels with Max: How My Dog Unleashed My Life

June 19, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Top 10 Ways to Save Money on Vet Bills

Everyone’s keeping an eye on the budget these days, and one of the most expensive pet expenditures is veterinary care. With just a little preparation and research, however, you can reduce your veterinary costs, from office visits to prescription medications.

1. Schedule an annual exam
Maintaining an annual exam schedule for your dog or cat is important, and this definitely not the place to trim costs. Spending money on an annual exam — and on spay and neuter — may seem like an expenditure but it’s an investment that will save you money down the road.

2. Maintain good dental health
Good dental care can save you hundreds of dollars in cleaning fees. Try to brush your dog’s or cat’s teeth several times per week using a special toothpaste and toothbrush designed for pets.

3. Ask about 3-year immunization schedules
The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA), the only organization that accredits animal hospitals throughout the U.S. and Canada, issued guidelines in 2006 about the frequency of immunizations. Whereas your pet once automatically received vaccinations annually, today the veterinary world is looking at longer periods between vaccinations, depending on your pet’s lifestyle. Ask your veterinarian for recommendations for your pet’s “core vaccines” and see if you can extend the time between immunizations. (The frequency of your pet’s rabies vaccines will be mandated by local law, however.)  But make sure you are not over-vaccinating.  Many vets recommend shots that really aren’t needed or required.  Like with children, we are finding out that we are over-vaccinating.

4. Avoid emergency vet visits with preemptive care
Does something just seem “not right” with your dog or cat? Is it a Friday afternoon? Don’t wait until the vet’s office closes for the weekend; run him by for a quick office visit if possible. The price of a routine office visit is far lower than the cost of an emergency vet visit. If you do wind up needing emergency veterinary care, check and see if follow up visits can be made at your regular veterinarian’s office to save money.

5. Feed your pet high quality food or better yet feed them real food  – raw or cook for them
Maintaining a healthy diet is key to good health. Premium dog and cat food containing quality ingredients is an investment in your pet’s health that saves you money down the line. Additionally, your dog does not need to be fed as much high-quality food as he would low-quality food packed with fillers. Less food means savings. Eventually, that premium food can result in lower veterinary bills, too, by keeping your pet closer to his ideal weight and by supplying him with beneficial nutrients.

6. Ask about special discounts
Check and see if your vet offers any special discounts. Whether you’re a senior, a firefighter, a military member, or a full-time student, your vet might have a discount plan for you. Also, if you have multiple dogs and cats, ask if there’s a multiple pet discount.

7. Watch for event-related discounts
Like with human health, there are special months that recognize and draw attention to particular aspects of pet health. Pet Dental Month (February) and Pet Wellness Month (October) are just two times when you might find related specials from your veterinarian.  Some have spay and neuter clinics.

8. Investigate pet insurance early
Pet insurance can be a great way to save on unexpected vet costs but, to lower your monthly premiums, insure your pet as young as possible. Most companies won’t insure a pet with a pre-existing condition and, at most companies, premiums are lower the younger your dog or cat is. At some companies, premium will even lock in at that lower rate. 

9. Ask about matching drug prices
Before your next trip to the veterinarian, spend a few minutes doing online research on reputable online pet pharmacy sites checking the price of heartworm preventative or other medications you know you’ll need. Remember to take into account shipping costs, too. Print the product page and take it to your vet’s office and ask if they can match the online price. 

**Also, there are many natural remedies that can be used in place of meds and chemical treatments which will be cheaper as well as healthier for your pet!**

10. Fill your dog’s prescription at your drugstore
Many pet prescriptions can be filled at your drugstore, saving you money and possibly giving you the option of generic, low-cost equivalents for some drugs. Ask your vet to see if it’s a possibility! 

Items like anti-flea treatments and regular meds can often be purchased online for much lower costs.

By Paris Permenter and John Bigley are the authors of Barkonomics: Tips for Frugal Fidos (Riviera Books). The husband-wife team are the publishers of DogTipper.com and CatTipper.com, sites featuring daily tips, news, giveaways, and product reviews. Paris and John can always be found on Twitter and Facebook, too!

Re-posted at Just One More Pet

June 19, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, pet products, Pet Recipes | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Crime: Gothic Felines? Woman Pierced Cats’ Ears and Tails… to Make Them More Marketable

A Pennsylvania woman finds herself under house arrest after piercing her cats’ ears, necks and tails. After gothifying the kitties, she then listed them online for $100 each. Apparently, she thought that the minor “improvements” she made would make the felines more marketable (it’s a tough economy, right?).

Aside from piercing the cats’ various body parts, the woman also docked their tails. In case you didn’t know, docking is a process that results in the removal of a portion of animals’ tails. The procedure is typically performed on working dogs and livestock in an effort to prevent infection (i.e. there’s typically a method behind the madness).

As you can imagine, it didn’t take long for PETA and the local ASPCA to catch wind of what had occurred. The woman, of course, has been penalized for her actions. Consumerist has more:

[The woman] was convicted of animal cruelty, and the Superior Court of Pennsylvania recently affirmed her sentence and conviction on the grounds that no one could possibly be stupid enough to think that this was a good idea. I paraphrase…

[She] defended her actions, using the examples of declawing surgery for cats and debarking surgery for dogs, both of which are controversial but legal. The court’s response was that these procedures have a purpose, while putting a metal ring through the scruff of a cat‘s neck kinda doesn’t.

Just an FYI to those of you out there considering animal piercings and cosmetics:

 gothcat1

Not a good idea.

(h/t Consumerist and the Blaze)

June 18, 2011 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, Unusual Stories | , | Leave a comment

Glendale considering ban on retail sale of dogs and cats

Glendale considering ban on retail sale of dogs and cats

The City of Glendale is considering a ban on the retail sale of dogs and cats.

Prohibiting the retail sale of household pets has in recent years gained steam as animal rights activists draw attention to so-called puppy mills and kitty factories — farms where dogs and cats are mass-bred with little consideration of health or comfort. An ordinance could come for a vote in coming months.

It is unclear whether the Glendale ordinance would affect any existing businesses because many pet shops say they transitioned long ago from selling dogs and cats to adopting them out in conjunction with shelters, according to the Glendale News Press.

“Nowadays you either switch over or you get such a bad rep,” Pedro Meraz, an employee at Anderson’s Pet Shop in Montrose, which stopped selling dogs and cats more than a decade ago,  “There are so many animals that need to be adopted.”

Source:  The L.A. Times

The puppy and kitty mills need to be shut down just like the smuggling rings who bring in exotics and birds in very cruel ways.  But there is room from legitimate breeders and it is proven that going back to allowing families to let their pets have a litter and then sell them through a local pet store is a lot better system and hopefully we don’t swing completely from the horrid puppy and kitty mill system working with complicit pets stores to a ban on what makes sense and used to work.  It sadly is the pattern of America!!

Great Adoption Story:

The tiny one

The tiny one

This little lady was at a shelter in Shippenville, PA. I heard they had a daschund mix and since our last adopted doxie had passed away – we had a big hole in our hearts that only a dog could fill. I went to the shelter and saw this little chihuahua/daschund (a Chiweenie as they are called) in a crate with the little puppies. She didn’t say a word when they took her out to meet me. She just shivered and looked up at me with her big black crossed eyes. Only a mom could love a face like that. I took her home that night. We called her Chi-Chi. That was seven and a half years ago and I still love her as much today.

Amy J Murphy
Hamilton, PA

h/t to the Animal Rescue Site for the story

We have 3-Chiweenies and they are great dogs.  JOMP~

June 18, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Should You ‘Foster’ a Pet?

When my only child headed off for school last fall, the house was quiet. Tomb quiet. Even my 6-year-old bichon frise, Rosie, felt the emptiness.

My home needed new energy, which soon arrived in a crate of three wiggling, yapping, licking and bounding dachshund puppies, who needed a foster home. Soon, 8-week-old Sunny, Red and Vinnie were filling big spaces in my heart and house with little antics — latching on to the same toy, tumbling over long-suffering Rosie, snuggling in my lap for a midmorning snooze.

Fostering rescue pets is a lesson in loving and letting go. It’s a great fit for older animal lovers who want to share themselves and their homes fully, but not forever.

"Fostering is particularly attractive to older people who generally have more flexible schedules and more time to devote to animals in need," says Kim Intino, director of shelter services for the Humane Society of the United States. Also, many shelters foot the bill for food, toys and vet bills, which makes fostering "attractive to folks on a fixed income," Intino says.

Fostering, which usually lasts between one week and three months, also can be a labor of love for snowbirds and frequent travelers, who shelter animals between trips.

"Some older people own two homes and aren’t in one area for a whole year," says Lois Lefkowitz of Virginia, who has fostered 24 animals over four years. "Fostering is a great way to have some companionship and help some dogs and cats."

Although national rescue groups don’t keep statistics on pet fostering, the Humane Society estimates that tens of thousands of families foster pets every year. In Sacramento, Calif., alone, the local Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals placed 1,000 animals — including rabbits and rats — with Sacramento-area foster families in 2009.

"Retired people are a prime resource for us," says Leslie Kirrene, a spokeswoman for Sacramento SPCA.

Questions to Consider Before Fostering a Pet

Dann Tardif/Blend Images/Corbis

  1. How long can I commit myself to a pet?
  2. What age pet do I want?
  3. What energy level suits me best?
  4. Does my apartment complex have pet restrictions?
  5. Do I have the patience to train a young or troubled pet, or nurse an ailing pet?
  6. Can I love and let go?

To find a pet to foster, contact your local animal shelter or rescue group. For a nationwide list of animal rescue groups and animals who need a foster family, visit petfinder.com.

Source: AARP

June 18, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Speak for Me a poem written in protest of animal abuse

Speak for Me a poem written in protest of animal abuse

Speak for Me a poem written in protest of animal abuse

I haven’t seen anyone for days.

My bones ache for attention,

As I see you walk away.

It didn’t use to be that way.

I guess I got to be too much to handle

As I now sit alone in my deserted land.

I have no voice of my own.

I need you to speak for me.

The days are long as I waste away.

Nowhere to go, I pull at the chains,

Welts at my neck, blood, misery and pain.

Can anybody speak for me?

As hunger rots my core, I wonder where you are,

And why you have left me here to suffer.

What agony did I cause to deserve this punishment?

Can anybody speak for me?

Do you even remember my name?

When your pellets silence my

Howling cries in the night?

With not even a grassy patch

To rest my weary head upon,

Dirt is all that remains from my constant pacing.

Can someone please speak for me?

I lay here dying and unloved.

As I am being tossed away with the banana peels

And other gluttonous garbage,

I needed you to speak for me.

Lauren Roller
Hewitt, TX

Take me to the home page

Source:  the Animal Rescue Site

Read more stories!

Support the No Kill Movement and be an advocate to toughen abuse Laws!

Visit North Shore Animal League America – World’s largest no-kill rescue and adoption organization  All Shelters and Rescues should be No Kill!!

June 17, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Patrick, Pet Abuse, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , | 5 Comments

San Francisco City Gov Bans Pet Fish? Hello?

First the bay city decided we American’s just shouldn’t be able to decide matters such as circumcision.

A Ryukin goldfish from The 6th "Pramong N...

We shouldn’t have to worry about decisions like that since we have a brilliant and all knowing government to think for us.

Now San Francisco is taking things a step further by possibly relieving the American’s that live within its limits of the terrible right to purchase a pet goldfish.

San Francisco’s Animal Control and Welfare Commission is recommending that the City ban the sale of goldfish, tropical fish and guppies in its borders, according to Matier and Ross.

The recommendation to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors is part of the commission’s ongoing efforts to discourage “impulse buys” of animals.

The commission’s ban would cover pet stores and breeders in the City. It comes after more than a year of study and findings that aquarium fish are often mass bred under inhumane conditions or stripped from the wild.

It almost seems as if these idiots read Atlas Shrugs and instead of learning lessons from it, they got ideas.

I mean, San Francisco has managed to chase off most parents with children, cutting off future generations of workers, business and tax dollars. They kicked a medical industry to the curb and now Pet Smart and many other pet stores are likely to notice little value of sticking around.

Good going liberals… way to succeed as a city.

Eric Odom

Source: Eric Dom

Related:

STOP Los Angeles and Other Major Cities from Unreasonable Pet Limit Laws and Restrictions

Southfield Implements Limit on Cats – Over Reaction!

Pet-Limit Laws Unconstitutional

Massachusetts Town Puts Limits on Cat Ownership

Adopt Just One More…MV Temporarily Reduced Adoption Fees

And here we thought Chicago’s attempt to pass a five-dog limit was controversial!

Homeless With Pets… Choosing Pets Over Shelter

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

Chinese City’s “One Dog” Policy Has Residents Howling

Florida’s Idea of Cat Population Control

Humane Society list of pet financial aid-related organizations

Where there is a will…

I care not for a man’s religion whose dog and cat are not the better for it." -Abraham Lincoln

June 17, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Just One More Pet, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change | , , , , , | 3 Comments

Meet Molly

A must see!

It is too easy to kill something out of ignorance, when there are alternatives and a willingness to save is available.

They shoot horses don’t they?

(Sadly all too often!)

You gotta meet Molly…

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Meet Molly..  She’s a grey speckled pony who was abandoned by her owners when Hurricane Katrina hit southern Louisiana.

She spent weeks on her own before finally being rescued and taken to a farm where abandoned animals were stockpiled.

While there, she was attacked by a pit bull terrier and almost died.  Her gnawed right front leg became infected, and her vet went to LSU for help, but LSU was overwhelmed, and this pony was a welfare case.  You know how that goes.

But after surgeon Rustin Moore met Molly, He changed his mind.

He saw how the pony was careful to lie down on different sides so she didn’t seem to get sores, and how she allowed people to handle her. She protected her injured leg. She constantly shifted her weight and didn’t overload her good leg.

She was a smart pony with a serious survival ethic.

Moore agreed to remove her leg below the knee, and a temporary artificial limb was built.  Molly walked out of the clinic and her story really begins there.

‘This was the right horse and the right owner,’ Moore insists.

Molly happened to be a one-in-a-million patient.

She’s tough as nails, but sweet, and she was willing to cope with pain. She made it obvious she understood that she was in trouble.  The other important factor, according to Moore , is having a truly committed and compliant owner who is dedicated to providing the daily care required over the lifetime of the horse.

Molly’s story turns into a parable for life in Post-Katrina Louisiana ..

The little pony gained weight, and her mane finally felt a comb.

A human prosthesis designer built her a leg. The prosthetic has given Molly a whole new life, Allison Barca DVM, Molly’s regular vet, reports. And she asks for it.

She will put her little limb out, and come to you and let you know that she wants you to put it on.  Sometimes she wants you to take it off too.  And sometimes, Molly gets away from Barca. ‘It can be pretty bad when you can’t catch a three-legged horse,’ she laughs.

Most important of all, Molly has a job now.  Kay, the rescue farm owner, started taking Molly to shelters, hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation centers.  Anywhere she thought that people needed
hope.  Wherever Molly went, she
showed people her pluck.  She inspired people, and she had a good time doing it.  

‘It’s obvious to me that Molly had a bigger role to play in life, Moore said. 

She survived the hurricane, she survived a horrible injury, and now she is giving hope to others.’ Barca concluded, ‘She’s not back to normal, But she’s going to be better.  To me, she could be a symbol for New Orleans itself.’

 

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This is Molly’s most recent prosthesis.

The bottom photo shows the ground surface that she stands on, which has a smiley face embossed in it.  Wherever Molly goes, she leaves a smiley hoof print behind.


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Share it with all of the animal lovers that you know and those that might no realize that there are always options.

God’s creatures often reflect the character we aspire to be.

Be a part of the ‘No Kill Movement’.  The greatest reasons for pet deaths in the U.S. ignorance and apathy by owners, plus our cruel “so-called” rescue and shelter system and policies!!

Related:

Miracle Dog Survives 4- Gun-Shot Wounds and Being Buried Alive

Amazing Dog Returns Home After Tornado With Two Broken Legs!!!

Tough Dog:  Game of Catch Ends With Heart Impaled by Stick

 

June 15, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, animals, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures, Wild Animals | , | Leave a comment

Why the blue penguin is blue

blue.jpg

This is a microscope view of the feather structure of the Little Blue penguin. The structure turns out to be pretty important, because it’s those tightly packed bundles of fibers that scatter light in just the right way and make the Little Blue penguin appear blue.

This is an important discovery, because learning how birds make color at the nanostructural level may help scientists synthesize artificial colored structures in the lab. Of course, it also has implications for penguin evolution. We are only beginning to understand how the microstructure of feathers affects their function in the air and under water

Source: BoingBoing

June 14, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Just One More Pet, Wild Animals | , , , | Leave a comment

Rare Pink Dolphin On The Brink Of Extinction

Video:  Rare Pink Dolphin On The Brink Of Extinction

June 14, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Wild Animals | , , , , | 1 Comment