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Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Owner of Milo’s Café dies at 42

Published: June 17, 2011  -  Updated: June 18, 2011 5:02 p.m.

By ERIKA I. RITCHIE  -  THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

LAKE FOREST – Scott Sellman, owner of Milo’s Café in Foothill Ranch, has died. He was 42.

According to friends and family, Sellman was in his office at the restaurant doing paperwork when at around 8 p.m. Thursday he said he felt short of breath and dizzy. He leaned back in his chair and collapsed, said Louis Teng, a friend and business adviser, recounting the story of another friend who was in the office with Sellman at the time.

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Scott Selllman loved animals and the friendship they helped spark among people who owned them. He died on Thursday at Milo’s Cafe, the restaurant he opened in March.  -  REPORTED BY ERIKA I. RITCHIE, PHOTO JOSHUA SUDOCK

The friend tried to help Sellman, and when paramedics arrived they administered CPR. Sellman was transported to Saddleback Memorial Medical Center where he was pronounced dead at 9:08 p.m.

Otto Cedeno, Sellman’s bother-in-law said the coroner told them at noon Friday that it appeared as though Sellman had an enlarged heart and died from a heart attack.

Sellman opened Milo’s Café after a yearlong effort to find just the right spot. Initially, he tried to open up at a new center built at Muirlands Boulevard and Ridge Route Drive. Those efforts were stopped by nearby neighbors who complained to the Planning Commission about potential traffic, noise and liability issues that might result from the restaurant and its outdoor play area for dogs.

The Planning Commission ruled against the restaurant for a different issue, noting that the patio would have to be built too close to the intersection. Sellman appealed the ruling to the City Council, which sided with the Planning Commission.

Sellman eventually found the spot in Foothill Ranch when Fuddrucker’s left the shopping center on Rancho Parkway that houses 24 Hour Fitness and the Home Depot. Sellman worked 16-hour days for months to create the restaurant environment he wanted – a dog-friendly eatery where people could get healthy food. His dog Milo, a 2-year-old shar pei-bulldog mix, was the project’s mascot.

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Sellman replaced Fuddrucker’s red carpet with porcelain tile, installed a dog-bone shaped bar and a half dozen 50-inch flat screen TVs. Andy Warhol dog art hangs on the wall, mixed in with family photos and pictures of Sellman’s dogs, Milo and Jake, a pug.

The dogs were the inspiration for the restaurant, Selllman once said. He called the dogs the great ambassadors of friendships between people. Sellman embraced the pet community, holding weekly fundraisers with groups such as Barks of Love, Coastal German Shepherd Rescue, Orange County Bulldog Rescue, Desperate Paws and Friends of Lake Forest Animals.

When the tsunami hit Japan on March 11, Sellman put out a call for donations and gathered several thousand pounds of dog food for Desperate Paws of Orange County, a Newport Beach-based dog club that shipped the food to Japan.

"Scott Sellman was a remarkable man who dedicated his entire restaurant to dogs and to helping our needy dog community," Desperate Paws founders Stephen and Brandi Terry said on Friday. "His dedication to local rescue groups, the Blankets of Love Program, to our Paw It Forward Campaign as well as our pet relief effort for Japan helped benefit dogs and cats greatly. He will be missed and we send our heart felt condolences to his family."

Tiffany Norton, director of Coastal German Shepherd Rescue, said she enjoyed working with Sellman and found his love for rescue dogs to be contagious.

"I knew him as an unselfish, honorable man who deeply wanted to give back to the community," Norton said. "He will be greatly missed by all."

Wendy Rashall, who owns pet-grooming service Furry Best, remembered Sellman’s love for animals.

"There was such a look of pure joy on his face every single time he gazed at his beloved Milo or Jake," said Rashall, who oversees the dogs that play on the restaurant’s patio. "Wherever he is now, I know he is finding comfort and joy surrounded by four-legged creatures that adore him. "

Councilman Scott Voigts regularly visited Sellman at Milo’s Cafe.

"I’m in schock," Voigts said upon hearing the news on Friday. "Over the last few months Scott has become a true friend. He was a wonderful and caring human being. My thoughts and prayers are with his family and those of us that new him."

Sellman’s wife Grace will continue to run Milo’s Café, Cedeno said.

"He believed in his business and helping people," he said. "He believed in charities and wanted to make sure all pets had a home. His vision will continue."

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Contact the writer: 949-454-7307 or eritchie@ocregister.com

Reposted at Just One More Pet

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Top 10 Ways to Save Money on Vet Bills

Everyone’s keeping an eye on the budget these days, and one of the most expensive pet expenditures is veterinary care. With just a little preparation and research, however, you can reduce your veterinary costs, from office visits to prescription medications.

1. Schedule an annual exam
Maintaining an annual exam schedule for your dog or cat is important, and this definitely not the place to trim costs. Spending money on an annual exam — and on spay and neuter — may seem like an expenditure but it’s an investment that will save you money down the road.

2. Maintain good dental health
Good dental care can save you hundreds of dollars in cleaning fees. Try to brush your dog’s or cat’s teeth several times per week using a special toothpaste and toothbrush designed for pets.

3. Ask about 3-year immunization schedules
The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA), the only organization that accredits animal hospitals throughout the U.S. and Canada, issued guidelines in 2006 about the frequency of immunizations. Whereas your pet once automatically received vaccinations annually, today the veterinary world is looking at longer periods between vaccinations, depending on your pet’s lifestyle. Ask your veterinarian for recommendations for your pet’s “core vaccines” and see if you can extend the time between immunizations. (The frequency of your pet’s rabies vaccines will be mandated by local law, however.)  But make sure you are not over-vaccinating.  Many vets recommend shots that really aren’t needed or required.  Like with children, we are finding out that we are over-vaccinating.

4. Avoid emergency vet visits with preemptive care
Does something just seem “not right” with your dog or cat? Is it a Friday afternoon? Don’t wait until the vet’s office closes for the weekend; run him by for a quick office visit if possible. The price of a routine office visit is far lower than the cost of an emergency vet visit. If you do wind up needing emergency veterinary care, check and see if follow up visits can be made at your regular veterinarian’s office to save money.

5. Feed your pet high quality food or better yet feed them real food  – raw or cook for them
Maintaining a healthy diet is key to good health. Premium dog and cat food containing quality ingredients is an investment in your pet’s health that saves you money down the line. Additionally, your dog does not need to be fed as much high-quality food as he would low-quality food packed with fillers. Less food means savings. Eventually, that premium food can result in lower veterinary bills, too, by keeping your pet closer to his ideal weight and by supplying him with beneficial nutrients.

6. Ask about special discounts
Check and see if your vet offers any special discounts. Whether you’re a senior, a firefighter, a military member, or a full-time student, your vet might have a discount plan for you. Also, if you have multiple dogs and cats, ask if there’s a multiple pet discount.

7. Watch for event-related discounts
Like with human health, there are special months that recognize and draw attention to particular aspects of pet health. Pet Dental Month (February) and Pet Wellness Month (October) are just two times when you might find related specials from your veterinarian.  Some have spay and neuter clinics.

8. Investigate pet insurance early
Pet insurance can be a great way to save on unexpected vet costs but, to lower your monthly premiums, insure your pet as young as possible. Most companies won’t insure a pet with a pre-existing condition and, at most companies, premiums are lower the younger your dog or cat is. At some companies, premium will even lock in at that lower rate. 

9. Ask about matching drug prices
Before your next trip to the veterinarian, spend a few minutes doing online research on reputable online pet pharmacy sites checking the price of heartworm preventative or other medications you know you’ll need. Remember to take into account shipping costs, too. Print the product page and take it to your vet’s office and ask if they can match the online price. 

**Also, there are many natural remedies that can be used in place of meds and chemical treatments which will be cheaper as well as healthier for your pet!**

10. Fill your dog’s prescription at your drugstore
Many pet prescriptions can be filled at your drugstore, saving you money and possibly giving you the option of generic, low-cost equivalents for some drugs. Ask your vet to see if it’s a possibility! 

Items like anti-flea treatments and regular meds can often be purchased online for much lower costs.

By Paris Permenter and John Bigley are the authors of Barkonomics: Tips for Frugal Fidos (Riviera Books). The husband-wife team are the publishers of DogTipper.com and CatTipper.com, sites featuring daily tips, news, giveaways, and product reviews. Paris and John can always be found on Twitter and Facebook, too!

Re-posted at Just One More Pet

June 19, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, pet products, Pet Recipes | , , , , , , | Leave a comment