JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Crime: Gothic Felines? Woman Pierced Cats’ Ears and Tails… to Make Them More Marketable

A Pennsylvania woman finds herself under house arrest after piercing her cats’ ears, necks and tails. After gothifying the kitties, she then listed them online for $100 each. Apparently, she thought that the minor “improvements” she made would make the felines more marketable (it’s a tough economy, right?).

Aside from piercing the cats’ various body parts, the woman also docked their tails. In case you didn’t know, docking is a process that results in the removal of a portion of animals’ tails. The procedure is typically performed on working dogs and livestock in an effort to prevent infection (i.e. there’s typically a method behind the madness).

As you can imagine, it didn’t take long for PETA and the local ASPCA to catch wind of what had occurred. The woman, of course, has been penalized for her actions. Consumerist has more:

[The woman] was convicted of animal cruelty, and the Superior Court of Pennsylvania recently affirmed her sentence and conviction on the grounds that no one could possibly be stupid enough to think that this was a good idea. I paraphrase…

[She] defended her actions, using the examples of declawing surgery for cats and debarking surgery for dogs, both of which are controversial but legal. The court’s response was that these procedures have a purpose, while putting a metal ring through the scruff of a cat‘s neck kinda doesn’t.

Just an FYI to those of you out there considering animal piercings and cosmetics:

 gothcat1

Not a good idea.

(h/t Consumerist and the Blaze)

June 18, 2011 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, Unusual Stories | , | Leave a comment

Glendale considering ban on retail sale of dogs and cats

Glendale considering ban on retail sale of dogs and cats

The City of Glendale is considering a ban on the retail sale of dogs and cats.

Prohibiting the retail sale of household pets has in recent years gained steam as animal rights activists draw attention to so-called puppy mills and kitty factories — farms where dogs and cats are mass-bred with little consideration of health or comfort. An ordinance could come for a vote in coming months.

It is unclear whether the Glendale ordinance would affect any existing businesses because many pet shops say they transitioned long ago from selling dogs and cats to adopting them out in conjunction with shelters, according to the Glendale News Press.

“Nowadays you either switch over or you get such a bad rep,” Pedro Meraz, an employee at Anderson’s Pet Shop in Montrose, which stopped selling dogs and cats more than a decade ago,  “There are so many animals that need to be adopted.”

Source:  The L.A. Times

The puppy and kitty mills need to be shut down just like the smuggling rings who bring in exotics and birds in very cruel ways.  But there is room from legitimate breeders and it is proven that going back to allowing families to let their pets have a litter and then sell them through a local pet store is a lot better system and hopefully we don’t swing completely from the horrid puppy and kitty mill system working with complicit pets stores to a ban on what makes sense and used to work.  It sadly is the pattern of America!!

Great Adoption Story:

The tiny one

The tiny one

This little lady was at a shelter in Shippenville, PA. I heard they had a daschund mix and since our last adopted doxie had passed away – we had a big hole in our hearts that only a dog could fill. I went to the shelter and saw this little chihuahua/daschund (a Chiweenie as they are called) in a crate with the little puppies. She didn’t say a word when they took her out to meet me. She just shivered and looked up at me with her big black crossed eyes. Only a mom could love a face like that. I took her home that night. We called her Chi-Chi. That was seven and a half years ago and I still love her as much today.

Amy J Murphy
Hamilton, PA

h/t to the Animal Rescue Site for the story

We have 3-Chiweenies and they are great dogs.  JOMP~

June 18, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Should You ‘Foster’ a Pet?

When my only child headed off for school last fall, the house was quiet. Tomb quiet. Even my 6-year-old bichon frise, Rosie, felt the emptiness.

My home needed new energy, which soon arrived in a crate of three wiggling, yapping, licking and bounding dachshund puppies, who needed a foster home. Soon, 8-week-old Sunny, Red and Vinnie were filling big spaces in my heart and house with little antics — latching on to the same toy, tumbling over long-suffering Rosie, snuggling in my lap for a midmorning snooze.

Fostering rescue pets is a lesson in loving and letting go. It’s a great fit for older animal lovers who want to share themselves and their homes fully, but not forever.

"Fostering is particularly attractive to older people who generally have more flexible schedules and more time to devote to animals in need," says Kim Intino, director of shelter services for the Humane Society of the United States. Also, many shelters foot the bill for food, toys and vet bills, which makes fostering "attractive to folks on a fixed income," Intino says.

Fostering, which usually lasts between one week and three months, also can be a labor of love for snowbirds and frequent travelers, who shelter animals between trips.

"Some older people own two homes and aren’t in one area for a whole year," says Lois Lefkowitz of Virginia, who has fostered 24 animals over four years. "Fostering is a great way to have some companionship and help some dogs and cats."

Although national rescue groups don’t keep statistics on pet fostering, the Humane Society estimates that tens of thousands of families foster pets every year. In Sacramento, Calif., alone, the local Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals placed 1,000 animals — including rabbits and rats — with Sacramento-area foster families in 2009.

"Retired people are a prime resource for us," says Leslie Kirrene, a spokeswoman for Sacramento SPCA.

Questions to Consider Before Fostering a Pet

Dann Tardif/Blend Images/Corbis

  1. How long can I commit myself to a pet?
  2. What age pet do I want?
  3. What energy level suits me best?
  4. Does my apartment complex have pet restrictions?
  5. Do I have the patience to train a young or troubled pet, or nurse an ailing pet?
  6. Can I love and let go?

To find a pet to foster, contact your local animal shelter or rescue group. For a nationwide list of animal rescue groups and animals who need a foster family, visit petfinder.com.

Source: AARP

June 18, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment