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Help Wild Horses and Burro Herds in Utah

ASPCA Urgent Alert

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Dear Animal Advocates,

We’ve been updating you all year about the U.S. Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) efforts to remove wild horses and burros from public lands. Once again, we’re calling on animal advocates throughout the country to speak up on behalf of wild horses—this time, for at-risk herds living on public lands in Utah.

The BLM is required by law to create Resource Management Plans (RMP) for certain public lands and their use. An RMP determines appropriate wild herd management levels, meaning how many horses and burros can remain on the land. It is now time for the BLM’s office in Cedar City, UT, which handles ten Herd Management Areas in southern Utah, to create a new RMP.

Because Utah’s public lands have historically been managed to maximize livestock grazing, we are particularly concerned that this RMP will shortchange the horses who live there. While more than three million acres of designated wild horse habitat have been “zeroed out” over the past four decades, privately owned livestock graze 22 million acres of BLM-controlled lands in Utah.

The BLM is accepting comments on the Cedar City RMP for a limited time only. It is critical that the agency hear from you TODAY to ensure that Utah’s wild horses are not pushed out and placed in danger of being rounded up.

What You Can Do
Please take a few minutes to email the BLM’s Cedar City Field Office and encourage the agency to adopt a responsible RMP for southern Utah’s wild horses. Your support is an essential step in protecting and preserving wild horse and burro populations.

Visit the ASPCA Advocacy Center to learn more and to send your email. Thank you for taking action for America’s iconic wild horses.

Visit www.aspca.org

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December 9, 2010 - Posted by | Animal Rescues, Just One More Pet, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, We Are All God's Creatures, Wild Animals

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