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Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Movie inspires Petfinder’s Foster a Lonely Pet for the Holidays Program


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Hallmark’s CBS special, A Dog Named Christmas DVD (Hallmark Hall of Fame) inspires holiday pet fostering

‘Tis the season … of Christmas re-runs. But there’s a new movie I bet will be on your seasonal favorite list from now on — and a brand new Petfinder program to go with it.

The show is Hallmark Hall of Fame’s presentation of A Dog Named Christmas DVD (Hallmark Hall of Fame).

Based on a great little book by author and Petfinder blogger, Greg Kincaid, the story follows a developmentally challenged young man who fosters a dog from his local shelter during the holidays and he gets the whole community involved. It’s a feel-good story with a great message.

The idea inspired Petfinder to start the Foster a Lonely Pet for the Holidays program, and we hope you will invite a shelter pet into your home for this special time of year.

By contacting a participating Foster a Lonely Pet for the Holidays shelter or rescue, you’ll be helping a shelter during a season when it’s short-staffed or when the pet’s regular foster “mom” or “dad” needs some respite time. Plus, you’ll be making a difference in some little (or big) critter’s life. You can hardly top that for imbuing yourself with Christmas spirit!

Fostering doesn’t have to be a long-term commitment — just a few days or a week. And if you’re thinking of adopting, this will be a great way to see how adoption might work out.

If you missed the movie on Sunday, November 29, on CBS, go to Hallmark.com and then find a participating shelter in your area and give them a call.

See if you can help. It will be a case of life mimicking art where everyone has a very happy holiday season.

You Might Also Like:

Before You Foster
Blog: 8 reasons you CAN foster a cat — even if you think you can’t
Video: Volunteering with Shelter Cats
Video: Volunteering with Shelter Dogs

Posted:  Just One More Pet

SEASON’S GREETINGS
Did you see “A Dog Named Christmas” on TV? We have our own share of pets named Christmas. Like the TV dog, they all need forever homes. How about yours?

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Related:

December 15, 2009 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Rescues, animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Save the African Painted Dogs

Project Update October 2009

Rotating image of painted dogs

Nov 11, 2009

I find it hard, it’s hard to find words, which can adequately express the emotions we are feeling at this moment.

Mashambo is dead.

I don’t know if my sense of loss or despair reaches a greater depth than that felt by Jealous, Xmas or Mk, the other people who worked most closely with Mashambo. I gave the instruction to capture him when he was only ten months old, when he turned up at our Rehab Facility on his own; they are the ones who carried out the capture. They were with me during the days on Starvation Island, when he, Mashambo, came of age, his hunting prowess keeping his pack mates alive.

It’s not the effort, the emotional investment and certainly not the financial investment that make the tears fall. It’s the absolute senselessness of the loss of a life that had already delivered so much and promised so much more. Mashambo was magnificent. A shining example of a species with so many commendable characteristics.

He died in a snare set in the Gwayi Conservancy. The snare that killed him was a seven strand woven cable, the type used for a vehicle handbrake or similar. It was set by someone perhaps hungry for food, someone looking for a way to ease his own personal existence. We don’t know the exact location that the snare was set, because Mashambo broke the snare in his struggle for life. If you know or are familiar with the type of cable I am talking about, you will know how strong it is. You need a seriously good pair of side cutters to cut through such a cable. Mashambo broke it, aided by his protective collar and certainly a will to live. The agony he must have suffered as the cable cut through his throat is impossible to imagine.

Jealous had been searching frantically for Mashambo and the rest of the fragmented Bambanani pack. The female, Vusile, was missing and we only had a decent handle on Sithule and Sibuyile, her two brothers and their cohort, Lobels.

Our Phd student, long time friend and supporter, Ester van der Meer, was helping Jealous. She called upon some pilots for help, who were in the area for a bit of a holiday and they responded by letting her fly with them to locate the missing dogs. Ester found the dogs quickly from the air, however when she came back to the PDC office, the concern on her face spoke volumes. The two brothers were north of the airfield, Lobels was far to the east and Mashambo was in the north-east. Njiva, who had been moving with Mashambo, was also missing and there was still no sign of Vusile. This wasn’t the worst of it. The signal from the collars worn by Lobels and Mashambo indicated that they were not moving.

Lobels was the easiest to locate and his body was recovered on Saturday. His desiccated remains were still attached to the tree by the snare that had killed him. His snare was made from copper telephone wire. I met with Xmas and Mk at our Rehab Facility on Sunday morning as they dug Lobels grave, we talked openly of our frustrations and the sadness felt at his loss. We had become familiar of course with Lobels, but that relationship was nothing compared to the one we felt we had with Mashambo.

It was fitting that Jealous came alone to my office with the news I was expecting about Mashambo. I walked to my land rover with him and we drove the short distance to the Rehab together, in silence. It was hard to hold the tears back and we arrived at the Rehab as Xmas and Mk dug the second grave of the day. Ester and her husband, Hans, stood in silence as I crouched down to inspect what was left of Mashambo. Uncertain of my voice, I silently apologised for letting him down, as I teased the seven strands of the cable snare apart.

He was buried without words from us, the raucous, somehow sinister chorus of calls from five pied crows provided a back drop of sound on a suitably, dismal, grey, over cast day.

Sithule and Sibuyile are still alive.

The Bambanani had been released on August 28th. Only two months have passed and the pack no longer exists in any real sense of the word. Sithule and Sibuyile were still alive for now, Vusile and Njiva are missing. This shows the enormity of the situation we are fighting against. A country ravaged by political and subsequent economic turmoil, which has impacted so devastatingly on many sectors, wildlife preserves being one of the most severely affected.

The Children from Gwayi Primary School learn about the life of Painted Dogs.

Online Donations:

Wildlife Conservation Network
Specifying “Painted Dog” in your online donation will ensure that 100% of the donation comes to the Painted Dog Project.
WCN is a non-profit 501(c)3 – #30-0108469

Send a cheque to:

In US Dollars:

Wildlife Conservation Network
(Specifying “Painted Dog” in your online donation will ensure that 100% of the donation comes to the PDC project.
Wildlife Conservation Network
25745 Bassett Lane
Los Altos, CA 94022 USA
Tel: 650.949.3533

Australia:

100% of donation will go to PDC in the field.
Painted Dog Foundation Inc
24 Earnley Way, Balga , WA, 6061
Incorporated in Western Australia
Registered Deductible Gif Recipient

UK (In Pounds Sterling)

100% of donation will go to PDC in the field.
Painted Dog Conservation UK
9 King’s Rd, St Albans Hertfordshire AL3 4TQ
Registered Charity No. 1074559

Europe (In Euros)

100% of donation will go to PDC in the field.
Stichting Painted Dog Conservation,
Terwindtplein 3,
2807 RP,
Gouda,
The Netherlands

December 15, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Political Change, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dog Chiropractor Helps Dogs Retain Mobility

COOS BAY, Ore. —  Rox Ann Kight can barely mask the pain in her voice when she talks about her Labrador-golden retriever mix Odie.

Original Article Posted on Fox News on September 17, 2007 – Updated December 13, 2009

About three years ago, Odie developed trouble walking and the vet said the only choices were surgery at $750 or euthanasia.

“They thought something was wrong with his leg,” Kight said.

She wasn’t convinced. As the director of the Bandon-based Assistance Dog Network, she has trained hundreds of dogs as service dogs for the disabled and currently cares for 15 dogs.

On the advice of another dog owner, she took Odie to Dr. Edward Lanway in downtown Coos Bay.

“(Odie) hobbled in here on three legs,” Knight said. “Within two sessions with the doctor” Odie could walk and run, she added.

Lanway is not a veterinarian. He’s a chiropractor.

Today, Odie serves as a currency-sniffing dog for the Department of Homeland Security at the Miami airport.

“People usually come to me because the veterinarians have given up on them,” Lanway said.

Lanway has treated thousands of human patients. Twelve years ago, he began working on dogs and has 15 to 20 regular canine customers.

Often, dog owners end up seeing Lanway themselves.

“I put down the dog’s name as the referral on our form,” Lanway said.

Assistance Dog Network Trainer Krista Llewellyn brings her dog, Prescott, to see Lanway about every six weeks. Two years ago, Prescott, a golden retriever, could barely walk. In addition to hip dysplasia, he had what vets called “growing pains” the result of rapid early growth, she said.

“He would cry out in the night from the pain,” Llewellyn added.

Prescott washed out of the service dog training program at eight months. Vets suggested euthanasia.

After an eight-week program with Lanway Prescott could run and play with other dogs. He now serves as a reading therapy dog at the Bandon Public Library.

“There is such a dramatic change in the dogs both mentally and physically,” Kight said.

Lanway works on dogs in the presence of their owners in an examination room in the back of his office. During the exam, he peppers an owner with questions about the dog’s habits and lifestyle to get a better sense of a plan of treatment.

Lanway uses the same techniques on dogs that he uses on his human patients, feeling for and treating tension points along a dog’s hindquarters, back and spine.

Laws governing chiropractors’ work on animals vary by state. Oregon’s only stipulation is that chiropractors treating animals must have a prescription from a veterinarian.

Lanway would like to see more regulation. Even thought it is not required by Oregon law, he took additional courses to work on dogs, he explained.

Lanway said some dogs are too old or too far along to respond to treatment.

“No treatment is 100 percent,” he added.

But Kight says the $30 charge per visit is worthwhile.

“It’s the best preventative medicine,” Kight said. “(Lanway) has saved a lot of dogs.”

Since this article pet/animal chiropractic care is becoming more and more available and is extending both the length and quality of pets’ lives.  Consider a chiropractor or acupuncturist for your pet before major surgery and definitely before euthanasia.

Posted:  Just One More Pet

December 13, 2009 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Success Stories | , , , , | 2 Comments

Chapman University Hosts ‘Furry Friends For Finals’

ORANGE,CA (CBS)  – Photo Courtesy: Chicago Sun-Times

Students at Chapman University can cuddle with puppies to alleviate stress from final examinations.

To help students deal with the stress of finals, a mental awareness group at Chapman University is bringing puppies to the campus.

Students will be able to pet, cuddle and play with the pooches during “Furry Friends for Finals.”

The dogs will be available on Dec. 9 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on the Argyros Walkway

Some students at Chapman University in Orange have added a weapon to their arsenal for coping with finals week — puppies.
A bunch of them will be stationed outside the university library for students to pet and play with Wednesday, in the middle of “cram week.”

The event, called “Furry Friends for Finals,” is being organized by the university’s Active Minds club, which promotes mental awareness and sought to find a way to relieve stress during finals week, the Los Angeles Times reported.

“It has been proven that having a dog helps relieve stress, so we thought it would be a cute idea if we brought some furry friends on campus,” Jennifer Heinz, a sophomore and integrated educational studies major who helped organize the event, told The Times. She said her poodle-and-Maltese mix, Bindi, helps her relax.

“I love my dog,” she told The Times. “Dogs are always so happy and want to play, and that helps make you happier.”

Active Minds will also have pamphlets and resources available on how students can reduce stress and take care of themselves during finals, Megan Brown, the group’s advisor and a counselor for Student Psychological Counseling Services, told the newspaper.

“Research has shown that animals can reduce anxiety and stress,” said Brown, who is also a licensed marriage and family therapist and says many students miss the pets they left behind at home.

The pooches — 10 Malteses, Yorkies, pugs and dachshunds — will be provided by Puppies & Reptiles for Parties, a Torrance-based company, The Times reported.

Orange County college has a new plan for dealing with finals-week stress: Puppies

December 4, 2009 |  1:30 pm

The fact that a friendly animal can help ease a human’s stress is well-established.  It was only a matter of time, then, before institutes of higher learning started catching on.  Locally, Chapman University in Orange County has done just that; a student group has arranged to have 10 puppies — Maltese, Yorkshire terriers, dachshunds and pugs — delivered to the campus to play with students during finals week.  Our colleague My-Thuan Tran has the story; here’s an excerpt:

PuppiesOn Wednesday, in the middle of “cram week,” a bunch of puppies will be stationed outside the university library for students to pet and play with. The event, called “Furry Friends for Finals,” is being organized by the university’s Active Minds club, which promotes mental awareness.

“It has been proven that having a dog helps relieve stress, so we thought it would be a cute idea if we brought some furry friends on campus,” said Jennifer Heinz, a sophomore and integrated educational studies major who helped organize the event.

Heinz said her poodle-and-Maltese mix, Bindi, helps her relax.

“I love my dog,” she said. “Dogs are always so happy and want to play, and that helps make you happier.”

Heinz said she’s received comments from other students expressing excitement about the cuddly canines.

“You can automatically see on someone’s face when something happy comes to them, and little dogs are a cute way of doing that,” she said.

More:

Chapman U. to try puppy therapy

A Chapman University student group wanted to find a way to relieve stress during finals week, so it came up with an innovative approach: puppies.
On Wednesday, in the middle of “cram week,” a bunch of puppies will be stationed outside the university library for students to pet and play with. The event, called “Furry Friends for Finals,” is being organized by the university’s Active Minds club, which promotes mental awareness.

“It has been proven that having a dog helps relieve stress, so we thought it would be a cute idea if we brought some furry friends on campus,” said Jennifer Heinz, a sophomore and integrated educational studies major who helped organize the event.

Heinz said her poodle-and-Maltese mix, Bindi, helps her relax.

“I love my dog,” she said. “Dogs are always so happy and want to play, and that helps make you happier.”

Heinz said she’s received comments from other students expressing excitement about the cuddly canines.

“You can automatically see on someone’s face when something happy comes to them, and little dogs are a cute way of doing that,” she said.

“It’s a nice way to step back from reality and just be stress-free for a moment.”

Active Minds will also have pamphlets and resources available on how students can reduce stress and take care of themselves during finals, said Megan Brown, the group’s advisor and a counselor for Student Psychological Counseling Services.

“The puppies are to draw them in and give them something fun and relaxing that will help them de-stress, but it also provides them with resources to help them through finals as well,” Brown said.

Many students miss the pets they left behind at home, she said.

“Research has shown that animals can reduce anxiety and stress,” said Brown, who is also a licensed marriage and family therapist.

The pooches — 10 Malteses, Yorkies, pugs and dachshunds — will be provided by Puppies & Reptiles for Parties, a Torrance-based company.

The 6,000-student campus in Orange also offers other functions to help students with the stress of finals, including a “Midnight Breakfast” where pancakes, eggs and coffee are served by the chancellor and professors.

Chapman U. puppies

Shannon Stewart with three of the puppies she will take to Chapman University in Orange next week as part of the school’s efforts to help students de-stress during finals. (Christine Cotter / Los Angeles Times / December 3, 2009) – Copyright © 2009, The Los Angeles Times

*Chapman University is a very student friendly campus, always open to new ideas.  Our daughter graduated from that campus just last year and would have loved this added de-stressor at finals time.  What a great idea!! Pet therapy has been proven to be a great aid in helping people recover from a long list of ailments and often replace medications and drugs with love.  Ask Marion/Just One More Pet~

December 10, 2009 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Success Stories, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Pets are way better than Therapy!

Get a dog or a cat

The often underestimated significance of a pet in the life of a human has been brought forward in a growing body of research that suggests that a household animal can provide a range of relational benefits.

Dr. Froma Walsh poured the research in two articles, entitled “Human-Animal Bonds I,” (focused on the benefits of companion animals) and “Human-Animal Bonds II,” (focused on their role in couple and family dynamics and family therapy).

The expert sought to determine the value of the human-animal bond in child development, elderly care, mental illness, physical impairment, dementia, abuse and trauma recovery, and the rehabilitation of incarcerated youth and adults.

She further looked at how the relationship can strengthen human resilience through times of crisis, persistent adversity, and disruptive transitions, such as relocation, divorce, widowhood, and adoption.

The expert found that a pet maybe seen as part of the healing team and even as a co-therapist in ensuring the well-being by providing a range of benefits, ranging from stress reduction and playfulness, to loyal companionship, affection, comfort, security, and unconditional love.

Dr. Walsh said: “The powerful meaning and significance of companion animals is underestimated.”

The study was published in the October 2009 issue of the Family Process. (ANI)

Posted: Just One More Pet

December 8, 2009 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

ASPCA: Thank You for a Great Year in Humane Legislation!

Legislative Success 2009

In 2009, ASPCA supporters like you made a world of difference for animals throughout the country. Together, we shared our anti-cruelty message with countless pet-passionate people—and lawmakers noticed. With the help of our more than 1.4 million Advocacy Brigade members, the ASPCA fought for and celebrated major legislative victories for both companion and farm animals.

Whether you wrote letters to your legislators to express concern about a federal or state bill, signed up for ASPCA Advocacy text messages to keep abreast of important legislative alerts or simply spread the word about our efforts to friends and family, the ASPCA appreciates your determination to make our world a better place for all living beings.

Read on to learn more about some of 2009’s brand new laws—laws that you helped pass!

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December 5, 2009 Posted by | animals, Change Number of Pet Restrictive Laws. Ordinances and Rules, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Success Stories, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences | , , | Leave a comment

Critter for Christmas Gift… Not Best Idea!

If you are really thinking of surprising someone with an animal for Christmas, make sure it’s made of fake fur and stuffed.  If you really want to get someone a pet for Christmas, give them a gift certificate or and IOU and then take them to find a pet, if they want one, of their choosing.

Nothing says “I’m clueless” like giving an animal at Christmas to someone who was neither wanting nor expecting that gift.

After the oohing and ahhing at the precious animal, the reality of what you’ve done sets in.

You have just given someone a 10- to 15-year commitment that can cost anywhere from a couple of hundred to thousands of dollars for care.

If you give a puppy, then you have further obligated them to be home every two or three hours to take the pup outside to use the bathroom.

They will spend the next year teaching their pup to be a good dog and not tear things up, don’t jump up, stop barking, house training and all the work that goes with helping the pet become a decent part of the family.

Cats are easier because you don’t have to go stand outside with them in 30-degree temperature on a freezing rainy day and beg them to use the bathroom.

But you are still obligating your beloved to the care of a pet. Also, why would you assume to know what personality of a pet suits what person? That’s a personal thing.

Pets are a very personal choice and the right fit is best for both the pet and their new parent.  I’ve always adopted my pets based on their personality fit into my home. These are not plug-and-play toys. Some people prefer affectionate cats, while others don’t mind the aloof ones.  Some like long-hair, some like short-hair.

You’re giving the gift of obligation that never stops costing or needing. I wouldn’t be happy to receive your gift. In fact, I would resent you and insist you take it back.

So, if you want to adopt an animal for your family and you want your children to have a pet, then buy a stuffed animal with a note attached that you will go as a family and adopt a pet this spring.

Why spring?

People have more time off. They don’t mind being outside so much in the better weather. And your family can decide what pet fits.

Spend this time researching various breeds, figuring out which ones, like Dalmatians, are athletic and require a lot of exercise and attention and which ones, like Rottweilers, are couch potatoes.

You’ll learn that Jack Russell Terriers aren’t as sedate as the character Eddie on the television show “Frasier” and all puppies aren’t as bad as Marley.

But the biggest lesson you will learn is that pet ownership is not something you decide like choosing a lamp. It’s a long-term commitment of money, time and love. The reward is immeasurable, but it’s not something you give someone else. They need to find it for themselves.

To see animals available locally, go to petfinder.com. On the left side, scroll to “Find local animal welfare groups” and follow instructions. On Petfinder’s home page you’ll also find a “pet promise certificate” you can download and give to someone.

By: Cindy Wolff – Commercial Appeal

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December 3, 2009 Posted by | animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , | 16 Comments

How walking the dog beats going to a gym: It gives you EIGHT hours of exercise a week

Geri Halliwell

Geri Halliwell’s svelte figure may be down to the regular walks she takes with her pet shih-tzu Harry

For those who are keen to keep fit but low on motivation, a personal trainer is often the best option.

But the human version may not be the most effective.

Dog owners get more exercise walking their pet than someone with a gym membership, researchers have found.

On average they exercise the animal twice a day for 24 minutes each time – a total of five hours and 38 minutes a week, a study for the pet healthcare experts Bob Martin found.

On top of that, the average owner takes their dog out on three long walks each week, adding a further two hours and 33 minutes to the total.

Those without a dog spend an average of just one hour and 20 minutes a week exercising by going to the gym or heading out for a stroll or jog.

Worse still, almost half – 47 per cent – of non-pet owners admit they do absolutely no exercise whatsoever.

A spokesman for Bob Martin said: ‘A couple of short walks a day soon adds up and this research shows that it amounts to more time than people spend in the gym.’

The study of 5,000 Britons, including 3,000 dog owners, revealed that 57 per cent see walking the dog as their main form of exercise.

More than three quarters say they would rather take their pooch for a hike than go to the gym.

Some 86 per cent say they enjoy taking their pet out each day, with just 22 per cent saying they ever see it as a chore.

But only 16 per cent say they enjoy exercising in the gym, with almost 70 per cent considering it a chore they have to do rather than something they would like to do.

The survey showed that having a dog to walk actually encourages regular exercise with 60 per cent of pet owners saying they always go for a walk with their dog – even when time is precious.

But 46 per cent of gym-goers admit they often find other things to do to get out of doing exercise.

More than half of dog owners think walking their pet is a great way to meet new people.

The spokesman said: ‘Owning a dog makes us more healthy. The Government recommends 30 minutes of moderate cardiovascular exercise 3-5 times per week and it’s encouraging to see that dog walkers are exceeding this target and enjoying it at the same time.’

Source: OnlineMail – UK

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December 2, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, pet fun, Pets | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Santa Photos With Fido or other Furry and Feathered Friends

Many places these days offer photos for pets with Santa.  Some do better jobs than others!!  Even within the a chain like PetsMart, the quality of the photos varies with the group doing the photos in individual stores.  And remember, most are Poloroid, so if they come out well have them copied or scan them in.

It really, really depends on your Petsmart location and who is doing the photos.  Most of the Petsmart “pictures with Santa” are sponsored/ run by local rescues inside the store, so the quality really varies. At our local Petsmart, you basically get a Polaroid of your dog sitting on Santa’s lap. Others may have a higher quality set up and better photographers.  Some allow and even encourage you to be part of the photo.

Some local malls have pets days and even some smaller pet store chains do Santa photos. They have a special “pictures with Santa” day during which dogs were allowed inside the mall in the evening for the photos. They are usually  sponsored by a rescue so the proceeds going to a good cause. The pictures are usually okay, but not great. Nothing to write home about but when you have x amount of dogs waiting in line and lots of stuff going on, even the best photographer may not manage making your dog look good in the picture.  And t is fun to have a photo with Santa.  Some of the photos of ourselves or our kids with Santa aren’t the greatest either, but as the years go by they seem to get better and better!

Some places will allow you to bring your own camera and take a shot as long as you buy their package.

Santa pet photos are usually with dogs, but I’ve seen people come in with cats, bunnies, ferrets pot belly pigs and even birds, but I would suggest coming in at a slow time to do that, or the cats and birds will be spooked and even try to run or fly away.  I did see a Santa come for the day to an exotic bird shop where people came with their large parrots and cockatoos.

Even with dogs, remember there will often be lots of dogs in line and Santa can be a scary figure to some!

Libby & Santa 2009 santababy

Councilman Ed Reisinger plays Santa at Locust Point Dog Park

Kitties with Big Brother and Santa at PetSmart

Merry Christmas… the Season has begun!

Ask Marion – Just One More Pet

December 1, 2009 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Just One More Pet, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Family Dog Found Dead After Groomer Mix-Up

CBS – A Stevenson Ranch woman has to bury her beloved dog after a mix-up at the groomers.

For some people, a pet is not just a pet, but a member of the family.

For Jo Joshua of Stevenson Ranch, she just wanted her pet dog to be well-groomed for the holidays.  But now she has to bury her dog.

“Teddy was not only a dog. He was my friend,” she said.

Joshua dropped off her beloved Teddy (Bear) at the groomer Wednesday.

It would be the last time she would see the five-year-old bichon frise alive.

It was a mix-up at the groomer that led to Teddy’s death.

According to Joshua, her son picked up Teddy in the afternoon and when he brought the dog home, she noticed it wasn’t her dog.

Joshua called the pet grooming store immediately and told them that they had given her the wrong dog.

Joshua found out that Teddy was sent home with another customer 20 miles away in Canyon Country.

When that customer got home and placed Teddy on the doorstep, Teddy ran away Joshua said.

Over the weekend Joshua handed out more than a thousand fliers looking for Teddy.

Family, friends, strangers and even the groomer helped in the search for Teddy and offered up half of the reward.
Calls to the groomer for this story were not returned.
On Sunday morning, a Metrolink worker had found Teddy by the train tracks.

“I could just see his fluffy body and you know I broke down and I was crying,” Joshua said.

For now, Joshua said her other dog has been her comfort.

She wants other pet owners to learn from her loss and insists that groomers keep track of their pets.

“We really need to tag animals when they go get washed. I think this is probably every owner’s worst nightmare,” Joshua said.
(This story is unrelated to the business named The Groomer located in Winnetka, California

Dog Mix Up Report Video

CBS Broadcasting Inc.

Posted Just One More Pet

December 1, 2009 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment