JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

How Safe is Invisible Fencing? What the Average Dog Owner May Not Know

Invisible Fence With Gate

What is an invisible fence besides a cheap way of confining your dog being pushed as safe and humane? Basically invisible fencing is a wire buried in the ground that interacts with a collar worn by a dog. When the dog approaches the perimeter of the “enclosed” area, the dog receives a shock. Some collars give a warning tone before the dog gets shocked while others do not. Some fences allow you to adjust the intensity of the shock while others may not. In theory, after a bit of training from the human, the dog will learn not to leave the yard or else he will get a shock.

Electric fences are growing in popularity. The reasons people using these or considering these fences have given me are varied with the most popular being: invisible fences are inexpensive; invisible fences are easy to install; there is no visible fence line; these fences supposedly safely and humanely confine the dog to your property. But are invisible fences all they are touted to be? How many people considering or actively using this type of fence are aware of the drawbacks? I am only highlighting the major ones that I have experienced with various clients and consults.

My first concern is the safety of the dog being confined. Is there any protection using an invisible fence? No. The invisible fence only acts on the dog wearing the special shock collar. Loose dogs, wild animals and humans will have full access to your yard and your pet. There is nothing physical to deter them from entering your property. If your property line is not clearly defined, pedestrians (especially in regions without sidewalks) may inadvertently walk into the dog’s territory. If your dog charges the perimeter at a pedestrian, it may be assumed your dog is loose and the pedestrian react one way or another. There is nothing to deter the theft of your dog. Dog thefts are a reality of life and owners must make it less attractive for someone to walk off with their pet. Not to mention the danger of illness such as rabies or injury from fight with wild or stray animals having easy access to the yard. Invisible fences offer no physical security for your dog.

How well do invisible fences confine your dog? Is it as securely as people are led to believe? Invisible fences may not confine your dog at all after time. I am amazed at how many dogs learn to ignore the shock. I love going to a house and being told “Bongo never crosses the fence line” as the dog dashes into the street to greet me, crossing the fence line and ignoring the shock collar. Many owners remove the collar once they feel the dog is trained so there is no more shock. But many dogs learn that once collar is off, nothing is holding them back.

I have watched dogs of clients slowly test the fence and show signs of building up their tolerance levels to the collar. Once a dog builds up a tolerance to the shock, there is nothing holding him in the yard. Fast moving objects can excite the drive to chase, pedestrians or animals close to the property line may bring out the natural urge protect their property. A dog excited to greet someone may cross the line forgetting the shock will happen. A dog that gets spooked by something may accidentally bolt through the fence line. Then what happens if the dog refuses to reenter the yard as the collar warns a shock will come? Dogs will tempt.

Dogs are dogs and cannot be relied upon to remember 100% of the time that they will be shocked if they cross the line. Finally, if you lose power, forget to change the batteries in the collar, some little critter chews through the line or the line just wears out due to elements, you lose your fence. Even dogs that have been maintained “reliably for years” with an invisible fence may decide to escape it one day. You may not realize your dog has learned to tolerate the shock or that the fence is inoperable or you have a dog that just does not care about the fence until tragedy occurs.

Finally, invisible fences are indiscriminant punishers and can lead to behavioral issues not readily apparent to the owner. Some of these issues may take time to develop. What is an indiscriminant punisher? Regardless of the action or intent of the dog, he will get a physical and sometimes painful correction from the collar. The dog gets punished all the time no matter what he is thinking or doing. Invisible fencing works through an adverse correction to the dog approaching the line: come too close and get hurt to some degree. To a dog, when a correction occurs it is for the action he is doing at the time of the punishment.

This is why trainers insist on never calling a dog and then punishing it. In your mind you may be punishing for chewing your shoes. However, in the dog’s mind punishment is for the action he was doing when he gets punished: coming when called. What if the dog was headed to happily greet the neighbor and then gets zapped? In his mind is he being zapped for approaching the perimeter or for greeting a human? We do not know. What if the starts to associate greeting happily with a zap – a negative? He can start to associate being friendly with negative. What if the dog is approaching the perimeter because he perceives a threat on the other side? He then gets zapped. In his mind the zap could be associated with the perceived threat. This can increase his threat level making him more likely to react.

If the dog associates the zap with his actions at the time, there is a chance he may stop giving warning as he approaches the perimeter. Now you have a dog that gives no warning signs before reacting. This is a very dangerous animal, as humans have no way of knowing its intent through body language. An invisible fence is indiscriminant in when it punishes and does not learn how to manage a dog humanely: it just responds to the proximity of the electric collar. I have worked with dogs that have developed fears of being on grass because they associated the shock with grass. Now these dogs are having issues as they refuse to potty on grass and are using decks, patios and even indoors as their potty spots.

Lastly, how cheap are these fences? Veterinary bills and/or a lawsuit can be far more costly than a good, barrier fence or secure dog kennel. Is the lack of security an electric fence provides worth saving a few bucks? Is it worth risking the chance that your dog may be the one to develop behavioral issues? It is far easier to work to prevent undesired behaviors than fix them later on.

In 22 plus years of working with dogs, I do not feel that invisible fences are a safe, humane or fair method of primary confinement for dogs. This type of fencing offers no protection to the dog and minimal protection from the dog to the general public. There are also behavioral issues that can arise through the use of these fences. Sadly, until one has been employed, there is no way of knowing how the dog will react over time to the fence. The safest form of confining dog to the property for its own protection and mental well-being as well as the protection of others is a good, physical, barrier fence.

Karen Peak

by Karen Peak
View Biography

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Just One More Pet concurs with this opinion. Invisible fences are not a safe, humane, fair or loving method of primary confinement for dogs.

The pet products industry and the “me generation” have developed and allowed for products that less than acceptable.  Anything that produces pain for your pet or unreasonable confinement or even unreasonable rules verges on bad pet parenting and being inhumane even if it isn’t against the law.

Most pet parents are loving guardians.  But many have been swept into the thought realm that if something works or makes it easier for them; its okay.  And that is just not the case.

We need to go back to using common sense plus treating pets as we would want to be treated. JOMP believes that is you would not be willing to use, do or go without something… a product or technique on your children or on yourself, it is not acceptable to do or use with or on your pets/animals!

Included on that list (but not exclusive to it) are:

electric or invisible fencing

all shock collars (which have caused death and permanent damage to many pets)

cages or carriers to restrict pets for anything but travelling or short periods (confining your pet in a carrier for hours while you are gone or while you sleep is inhumane)

any collars and training apparatus using spikes

Again, we need to go back to using common sense plus treating pets as we would want to be treated. If you would not be willing to use, do or go without something… a product or technique on your children or on yourself, it is not acceptable to do or use with or on your pets/animals!

Pets like children make messes and make mistakes sometimes… it is life.  Pets/animals like children create extra work in your life.  And like with children, if you have pets and animals your house and yard won’t (and shouldn’t look or be perfect), will sometimes be messy and sometimes even sustain some damage or need repairs.  Again that is life with other being and creatures. If you can not relax and live with that… perhaps you should not have children, pets or animals of any time.

The exchange for the extra work and some messes for you and mistakes by them is love, companionship and joy.  Everything in life is a trade off.  Ask Marion/JOMP~

Girl unsuspectingly walks through invisible fence line while holding neighbors electric dog collar”

Looks real humane, fair and loving doesn’t it?? – Video

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Related Posts:

‘Dogs Have The Intelligence of a Human Toddler’

GoD and DoG

October 22, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Friendship and Love, pet products, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

ABC NEWS: ‘Hollywood Tough Guy Teams With Animal Rights Groups for Tax Change’

Update:  Help make pet care more affordable — urge U.S. Office Majority Leader Steny Hoyer to support the HAPPY Act. Take action!

“What a pro-active way to be able to help the economy and change the culture in this country around animals,” Robert Davi, a veteran actor (”The Goonies,” “Die Hard,” “License to Kill”) who was a main force behind the bill’s introduction, told ABCNews.com in a telephone interview.

Tax Relief to Keep Pets at Home

abc_pets_davi_091013_mn

“This money goes back into the economy, and it encourages people to understand the social responsibilities we have toward animals,” Davi said. …

***

A bill making the rounds on Capitol Hill marries two feel-good propositions — tax cuts and pet ownership — to generate a novel idea: A tax break of up to $3,500 per person for pet care expenses.

The measure is a legislative long shot. But it’s been championed by a veteran Hollywood tough guy and by a conservative Michigan congressman [Rep. Thaddeus McCotter, R-Mich], and has drawn the enthusiastic support of animal rights groups eager to promote pet ownership during economic down times. …

***

The tax break would apply to more exotic pets as well, so long as they’re being owned within the bounds of the law. Any “legally owned, domesticated, live animal” would qualify, under the terms of the bill.

According to the ASPCA, a cat costs about $670 a year on average to take care of, while dogs are about $200 a year more expensive. The tax break would be capped at $3,500 per person, regardless of how many animals a taxpayer owned.

Davi, the owner of four dogs and a cat, said the concept of using the tax code to promote pet ownership occurred to him a few months ago, in thinking about the stimulus package passed by Democrats in Congress — a package, he said, that he opposed.

Davi’s cousin runs a prominent California animal rescue foundation, D.E.L.T.A. Rescue, and is always looking for ideas that would get more pets adopted, he said. Why not let people deduct expenses like pet food and veterinarian bills from their taxes, like child care expenses or mortgage interest can help reduce your tax burden?

by Big Hollywood

Read the full article here.

Write your congressperson and encourage them to vote for this bill.

This is actually a pretty good idea during these tough times because it will help reduce the burden on cities by reducing the numbers of abandoned pets by giving families a helping hand.  And, it will encourage people to adopt animals from shelters if they could deduct the costs.

Pets are a joy, but just like children, they are an expense and times are tough.

Humanity and Pets Partnered Through the Years (HAPPY) Act

Support the ‘Happy Act’ HR 3501 – Tax Deduction for Your Pets

The HAPPY Act in Process – Pet Tax Credit Introduced by Congressman Thadd…

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Related Posts:

October 19, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Stop Euthenization | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Does Lead in Toys Pose a Danger to Pets?

dog

Whether your pet prefers squeaky rubber squirrels, stiff rawhide bones or fuzzy mice, he or she undoubtedly loves to play with toys. But is the source of your dog’s or cat’s merriment safe? Many common household products—including toys for children and pets—may contain trace amounts of lead and other toxins. In most cases, however, the levels of these ingredients in toys don’t pose a significant threat to your furry friend.

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) reviewed 200,000 cases from the past two years and produced no examples of lead poisoning from pet toys. According to Dr. Sharon Gwaltney-Brant, ASPCA Vice President and Medical Director of the APCC, younger dogs, just like children, are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning, but most studies reveal only tiny amounts of lead in pet toys—not a grave risk for acute or chronic lead poisoning in dogs.

“Just because it’s ‘detectable’ doesn’t necessarily make it hazardous,” says Dr. Gwaltney-Brant. “Even oxygen is toxic at the right concentration.”

And what about other types of treats such as rawhide bones? Like pet toys, rawhide chews can include trace amounts of pesky chemicals. Dr. Safdar Khan, Director of Toxicology at the ASPCA, believes many dog lovers would be surprised if they learned the true contents of their pets’ treats. But he also adds that pet parents would likely be surprised if they knew the complete ingredients of what they eat and drink, too.

The reality is that a dog is much more likely to suffer obstruction from a rawhide bone than poisoning from a hidden toxin. In general, the smaller the dog, the fewer rawhide treats he should receive, and only give your pet rawhides under a watchful eye. Remember, it’s always wise to supervise!

And lest you think we’re leaving out our feline fans, here are a few safety tips to keep in mind when shopping for kitty’s favorite play things:

  • The wand toy, often adorned with feathers, string or small stuffed toys, is ubiquitous. But take care with it, and watch for pieces of string or other components that might fall from the toy and get swallowed by your cat.
  • Another popular treat for the kitty set is catnip. Word to the wise—some cats become very excited when smelling or eating it, so be careful about petting your cat until you know how she will respond.
  • Please don’t let your cat play with rubber bands, paper clips or plastic bags. All can prove dangerous and a choking risk to our feline friends.

For more information about playing it safe with your pet, please visit APCC online.

Sources:  ASPCA

Posted:  Just One More Pet

October 19, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Just One More Pet, pet products, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Dog Rescued From Fighting Becomes Therapy Dog

A dog rescued in the historic July dog fighting raids has been passed to the custody of a California Pit Bull rescue organization, and will now become a therapy dog.

Dog Rescued From Fighting Becomes Therapy Dog

Missouri District Courts have ordered that permanent custody of most of the dogs rescued in July’s multi-state dog fighting raids be transferred to the Humane Society of Missouri, who will determine suitable placements for each individual dog. In what was the largest dog fighting raid to date, more than 500 fighting dogs were rescued across 8 states, with 26 arrests being made on the scene. Nearly all of the dogs were purebred or mixed American Pit Bull Terriers, and since the raid, the rescued dogs have given birth to approximately 100 further puppies.

Broken Hearts, Mended Souls Rescue of Missouri is receiving 3 of the dogs, including Junior, Kali and Carlos who range in age from 5-months to 11-years old. Broken Hearts, Mended Souls places dogs with foster families who teach the dogs what it means to be a loved family member, with the aim of finding a suitable permanent home.

Mutts-n-Stuff, a St. Louis-based bully breed rescue group is receiving Fay, Eli and Jakob, who are 5 years, 7 months and 1 years old respectively. Eli will be relocated to New Hope Pit Bull Rescue of Goose Creek, South Carolina, and Jakob will be sent to Our Pack Inc. Pit Bull Rescue based in San Francisco, California. Jakob will now be trained as a therapy dog. Our Pack Inc. will train Jakob in basic manners before he will be employed to provide affection and comfort to people in hospitals, retirement homes and schools.

“As soon as we saw pictures of Jakob, we knew he was special. Although Jakob comes from an abuse case, we’ve seen time and again these dogs are cut out for therapy work and we think he is a great candidate for this kind of work. The most important characteristic of a therapy dog is temperament, and as we know, Pit Bulls have loving, affectionate natures that often make them perfect for this kind of job,” said Marthina McClay, President/Founder of Our Pack Inc.

San Francisco, California (Oct 15th, 2009)

Humane Society of the U.S. finally changes its policy on fighting dogs

————

Therapy Dog Needs Hearing Ad

Deductible Contributions to:

The Fire Department

The Borough of Danville

239 Mill St.

Danville, PA 17821

October 17, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rescues, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

COMMUNITY CATS IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Best Friends Animal Society celebrates National Feral Cat Day, Oct. 16, 2009.

Best Friends Animal Society encourages people to use National Feral Cat Day on October 16 as an opportunity to learn how they can be part of the solution to make life better for homeless cats.

Started in 2001 by Alley Cat Allies, National Feral Cat Day has become “an effective way to highlight the issue of overpopulation of feral and stray cats, and the humane approaches to helping them,” said Shelly Kotter, Focus on Felines campaign specialist for Best Friends Animal Society.

Kotter explained that Best Friends Animal Society believes that the needs of free-roaming cats and the issues surrounding them — which exist in every community — are best encapsulated in the term “community cats.”

“There is no one description that fits all free-roaming cats,” Kotter added. “These homeless cats are the result of a failure in the community — unneutered housecats that wandered away from home, cats abandoned when the family moved, or cats that have never been socialized to people in the first place. None of these cats would be on the streets if people had spayed or neutered their pets and kept their cats safe.”

Kotter outlined some simple steps to help homeless cats. “You can get involved as much, or as little as your schedule and budget permit. Don’t underestimate what seems like a small contribution to the cause, many people doing little things add up to major accomplishments,” she said.

  • If you feed stray cats, spay and neuter them so that the breeding cycle is stopped.
  • Keep your own cats from becoming statistics. Have them live in the home. Get them spayed or neutered, vaccinated and microchipped. If you want your cat to have outside experiences, please consider screening-in a porch or patio, building a cattery, investing in special cat fencing, and/or teaching your cat to walk on a harness.
  • Support your local community trap/neuter/return (TNR) groups. Donate — even small amounts add up. Volunteer a couple of hours a month.
  • Become a caregiver for a local cat colony.
  • Foster adoptable kittens or lost housecats rescued during TNR operations.

“Best Friends believes the solutions for these cats rest with the community as well. Through a variety of strategies, people have the power to help the cats lead a humane life as well as reducing the number of cats who are eking out an existence on the streets,” Kotter said.

“We like to think that every day is ‘community cat day.’ We are working with communities across the country on innovative and proactive programs to help lessen the numbers of feral and stray cats euthanized in shelters.

“Through our work, several rural Iowa communities have embraced TNR programs, fostering and re-homing kittens and tame cats rescued from colonies. If the cats are in a place where they are at risk, the people in these towns follow strict relocation protocols to provide the cats a new home,” Kotter said.

And to give thanks to the many local people in southern Utah who help care for community cats, Best Friends is hosting a special appreciation brunch on Saturday, October 17, in honor of National Feral Cat Day. Co-founder and interim CEO, Gregory Castle will be speaking, a tribute movie will be shown, and special awards will be presented to relocation caregivers.

Other successful components of Best Friends’ Focus on Felines program include:

Four Directions Community Cat Program (southern Utah)

This unique program works with more than 38 urban and rural communities in southern Utah. Best Friends’ clinic as well as five veterinary clinics around southern Utah participate in this low cost spay/neuter program. The program has six new relocation colonies that re-home community cats who otherwise would have been euthanized.

FixNation (Los Angeles)
Best Friends works in Los Angeles with FixNation, a nonprofit clinic that cares mainly for feral and stray cats but also operates as a low cost spay/neuter clinic. The first of its kind in the United States, the ground-breaking clinic leads the way as a model for community cat clinics around the country. The clinic works with local groups and individuals to battle cat overpopulation, providing free spay/neuter services for feral and stray cats, as well as shots and health checks. In addition, FixNation and Best Friends work together to lower the shelter euthanasia rates in East Valley, an impoverished area of Los Angeles. The program targets East Valley residents, offering TNR as an alternative to trap and kill. In the first year of the program, estimates are that East Valley shelter cat intake statistics will be reduced by five percent.

First Coast No More Homeless Pets (Jacksonville, Florida)

The killing of community cats has ended in Jacksonville. The Feral Freedom Program is a collaboration between the city of Jacksonville, First Coast No More Homeless Pets (FCNMHP), the Jacksonville Humane Society and Best Friends Animal Society. Cats who arrive at the shelter in traps are turned over to FCNMHP to be spayed/neutered, then returned to their original trap location. Other communities are adopting this program as a way to save lives and taxpayer dollars.

No More Homeless Pets in Utah (northern Utah)
No More Homeless Pets in Utah and Best Friends work together with local governments to improve the shelter systems in northern Utah using tax dollars to combat the over population of community cats.

Click this image to see the Best Friends National Feral Cat Day videoHow you can help

  • Click on the image to the right to see the Best Friends National Feral Cat Day video.
  • Listen to Shelly Kotter discuss National Feral Cat Day on this PRWeb podcast.
  • For a listing of special National Feral Cat Day activities, click here.
  • If you are a caregiver in southern Utah and need additional information about the appreciation brunch, or wish to learn more about the Four Directions Community Cat Program, please contact shannonr@bestfriends.org.

By Best Friends staff – Photos by Molly Wald

Posted: Just One More Pet

October 17, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rescues, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pets, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

STOP NY OC SHERIFFS OFFICE FROM KILLING HUNTER

STOP NY OC SHERIFFS OFFICE FROM KILLING HUNTERHunter is a 7 year old German Shepherd. He has been a member of the Orange County Sheriff’s Office K-9 since 2003. At the age of 5, Hunter was taken away from his first handler and given to his second handler. During the transition, Hunter experienced emotional trauma and was taken to his veterinarian who recommended neutering and a canine behavioralist/psychologist.  Now Hunter has developed a bond with his new handler and has found happiness in his new home.

In April of 2009, Hunter was diagnosed with progressive heart disease. He has served his department for 6 years. His K-9 handler is moving on to another police department and requested Hunter be retired to live as a pet for the remainder of his life.

After being refused, the handler offered to pay for a new police dog at FULL COST. The Office still plans on taking Hunter away from his current handler and placing through the police academy for the THIRD TIME. It is unfortunate that Hunter is being used as a pawn as a way for the Office to make and example and get their retribution toward the handler.

Hunter is going to be forced out of a loving home in order to be worked to death by the Orange County Sheriffs office.

Jade (a member) has also pointed this out: I think a VERY good case can be made for this being animal cruelty, under NY statutes http://www.facebook.com/l/;www.animallaw.info/statutes/stusnyag_mkts332_379.htm#s353a
I believe this can be classified as “Neglect and Overwork Provisions” Chapter 40. Of the Consolidated Laws. Part Three. Specific Offenses. Title H. § 353. Overdriving, torturing and injuring animals; failure to provide proper sustenance, since this is an animal with a known health condition which will be seriously aggravated if the animal is forced to work (training academy is work). Perhaps someone should consider writing Captain Barry up on this – it IS a class A misdemeanor, unless aggravated cruelty can be proved, in which instance it is a felony.

Please join this group and tell your friends. Please contact the Orange County Sheriffs department and tell them what you think.
http://www.orangecountygov.com/orgMain.asp?orgid=86&storyTypeID=&sid=
Phone: (845) 291-4033 EXT: 7694 (Captain Berry)
Email Form: http://www.orangecountygov.com/orgMain.asp?orgid=86&custom=contact&sid=
Governor’s Office Email: http://www.state.ny.us/governor/contact/index.html
Alison Epstein (Governor’s representative in Orange County): (845)334-9378 County Executive Email: http://www.orangecountygov.com/orgMain.asp?orgid=76&storyTypeID=&sid=&
Contact for the Mayor:
http://www.yellowbot.com/goshen-village-mayor-goshen-ny.html

Stu, the Orange County Sheriff’s office is refusing to retire a terminally ill police dog despite the handler offering to pay for a replacement dog to be purchased and trained. Please ask people to go to http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=152391087894 to get information on where to write to help Hunter, the police dog

Also:
-Average age of retirement for a working dig is between 8-9 years old
– In the past, a K-9 Deputy was fired and allowed to keep his 3 year old healthy working dog.

Contact Info:

Email:

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Related Posts:

Military Punishment for Dog Killer, Abuser a Joke! No Justice! VIDEO

Glenn Beck – Teen punks murder American Hero’s Dog

Humane Society of the U.S. finally changes its policy on fighting dogs

Adopting a Four-Legged Veteran

Military Punishment for Dog Killer, Abuser a Joke! No Justice! VIDEO

Police Dog Killer Gets Life Without Parole

Tails of Love

October 17, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet and Animal Training, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Pets feel the crunch of the economic crisis

spencer2.jpgEven the four-legged members of the family are starting to feel repercussions from the economic downturn. According to an article in the San Francisco Chronicle, more and more people are feeling compelled to give up their pets due to financial constraints.

The article sets the typical annual cost of caring for a pet at $1400 for dogs and $1000 for cats. In these difficult times, some people are finding themselves unable to justify continuing to support a pet when they are having trouble putting food on the table for the human members of the family.

Although I realize that there is a reality to be faced when considering the well-being of your family as opposed to whether or not you keep the family pet, I have a difficult time justifying any type of abandonment. I believe that animals have feelings much like people do. They feel fear, pain, joy, anger, and loneliness. I’ve always found it heart wrenching that you can’t explain hardship or other unpleasantness to animals. Though going through challenging times with a child can be difficult, at least you are able to provide explanations and reassurance. An animal cannot understand words. They only know that you are gone and they are alone.

I was glad to see that the article mentioned a program available in Virginia Beach through the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The Help Out Pets Everywhere (HOPE) program offers financial assistance and other aid to pet owners facing unemployment, foreclosure, or other financial distress. I hope that other organizations make similar programs available. Though caring for pets may cost money, the love and comfort they provide in return is priceless. Especially for families with children, the loss of a family pet can be devastating.

Do you know of ways people can help others who are facing difficult decisions about their pets? Have you experienced this hardship first hand?

Posted by jamie lee in Money | December 23rd, 2008 | TrackbackThe dog in the image above is my dog, Spencer.

Volunteer and Donate to the HOPE type organization in your area as well as to the local shelter.  If there isn’t a local organization… consider starting one.  Also, we beg pet owners not to abandon their pets and only give them up after pursuing all other options.  Ask Marion, Just One More Pet

Related Posts:

October 16, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | 4 Comments

Too Funny… I Had To Share….

clip_image001

clip_image001[5]

clip_image001[7]

Related Posts:

Why Dogs Bite 😉

Just One More Pet

October 14, 2009 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animals, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, pet fun, Pets | | 1 Comment

Why Dogs Bite… ;-)

If You wonder WHY literally thousands of people go to the hospitals with bite wounds every year!?

Maybe this will answer your questions 😉

These range from cute to down right scary….


Why Dogs Bite People……

clip_image001

clip_image002
clip_image003
clip_image004
clip_image005
clip_image006
clip_image007
clip_image008
clip_image009
clip_image010

clip_image012

clip_image011
clip_image013
clip_image014
clip_image015
clip_image016
clip_image017
clip_image018
clip_image019
clip_image020
clip_image021
clip_image022
clip_image023
clip_image024
clip_image025
clip_image026
clip_image027
clip_image028
clip_image029
clip_image030
clip_image031
clip_image032

Dress Your Dog or Cat (Any Pet) Up For Halloween – Part I

Halloween Countdown: Keeping pets safe this Halloween – Part II

Too Funny… I Had To Share!

Posted:  Just One More PetCheckout the Costumes… at a Discount

October 13, 2009 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Just One More Pet, pet fun, Pets | , , , , | 1 Comment

GOD and DOG

This was sent to me from a fellow animal lover and I want to share it with you. . .

GOD and DOG by Wendy Francisco

I look up and I see God, I look down and see my dog.

Simple spelling GoD, Same word backwards DoG.

They would stay with me all day, I’m the one who walks away.

But both of them just wait for me, And dance when I return with glee.

Both love me no matter what, Divine God and canine mutt.

I take it hard each time I fail, But God forgives. . .dog wags his tail.

God thought up and made the dog, Dog reflects a part of GOD.

I’ve seen love from both sides now, It’s everywhere. . .AMEN. . .BOW WOW.

I look up and I see God, I look down and see my dog.

In my human frailty, I cannot match their love for me.

GoD and DoG

Source:  ConnieD on AARP Dogs Blog Group

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Related Posts:

On the First Day God Created Dog

‘Dogs Have The Intelligence of a Human Toddler’

October 13, 2009 Posted by | animals, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 29 Comments