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GETTING TO ZERO

Ending Euthanasia of Healthy & Treatable Animals –  A New National Initiative of the American Humane Association In Cooperation with Visionary Corporations and Foundations  
The American Humane Association’s Getting to Zero®

Initiative is a critical, new national undertaking based on realistic assumptions and the profound belief that, within our lifetime, American society can reduce to zero the number of healthy or treatable dogs, cats and other companion animals that are euthanized in animal care and control facilities. This will not be easily accomplished, but we believe that with the replication of identified best practices to shelters and animal-welfare groups across the country — utilizing seed and operational funding provided by visionary companies and organizations as well as advice and consultation from the best in the field — the immediate impact can be substantial and sustaining, thus leading to zero euthanasia of healthy and treatable animals within 25 years.

Funding will be used to take the best practices available and replicate them, initially, to 12 shelters in geographically diverse areas of the country and, subsequently, to encourage and sustain further replication of these best practices to most, if not all, animal care and control facilities in the country.

Working in partnership with the animal-welfare community and corporate and foundation donors, American Humane launched this three-year initiative in 2006.

American Humane has made the reduction and eventual elimination of shelter euthanasia of healthy dogs and cats one of its highest priorities. Although many Americans maintain a deep love and affection for animals, and pets are cherished members of millions of families, the millions of healthy, adoptable dogs and cats euthanized each year remains a source of shame for our country. It is a situation that most view as socially and morally unacceptable.

There is growing public support for assuring that no adoptable animal is put to sleep at a shelter or abandoned in the street. It is a goal that deserves the efforts and commitment of every group and individual with concern and compassion for animals. American Humane recognizes that animal overpopulation is the result of human decision-making and all of us have a responsibility and role in its reduction.

Every year, at least 3.7 million dogs and cats are euthanized in shelters in the United States. Indeed, it has been noted that in many areas of the country, a majority of animals entering the shelter system “are euthanized rather than adopted or reclaimed by their owners.” This problem is not limited to a single area of the country or a single segment of our population — animal care and control facilities from coast to coast are flooded with healthy animals looking for a good home. It has been this way for decades although over the past 20 years, we have seen a sharp reduction in the numbers of animals euthanized.

American Humane is committed to helping identify, support and obtain funding for the replication of community-based interventions that have demonstrated success in reducing the euthanasia of healthy or treatable animals. We are convinced that by working together and adopting practices that have been shown to be effective, we will hasten the day when euthanasia is no longer viewed by the public as an unfortunate but inevitable consequence of animal control.

Source:  American Humane 

Shelter dog in kennel

 

Shelter kitten in kennel
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February 27, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Alternative Oscars: The Most Humane Animal Movies

doggie-movie-starAs America celebrated “Oscar Night” last Sunday, the American Humane Association saluted those films that earned the coveted “No Animals Were Harmed” end-credit.

American Humane, through its Los Angeles-based Film & TV Unit, has a long-standing presence in Hollywood.  Since 1940, it has overseen the use of animals in filmed entertainment. American Humane is the only organization authorized to monitor the safety of animals on the sets of movies, TV shows, commercials and music videos. Productions that make sure to have an American Humane Animal Safety Rep on set and follow American Humane’s “Guidelines for the Safe Use of Animals in Filmed Media” and keep animals safe on the set are awarded the famous “No Animals Were Harmed” end-credit disclaimer.

“The use of animals in filmed entertainment celebrates the roles of animals in our history, in our families and in our lives,” said Marie Belew Wheatley, president and CEO of American Humane.

American Humane’s Film & TV Unit, when asked what films it would recognize if the organization had its own version of the Oscars, named the following, all of which earned the right to say “No Animals Were Harmed.”

Best Movie Magic Featuring an Animal: The Dark Knight  – The film features a very dramatic sequence in which dogs attack a man and then are attacked themselves. Rest assured, no dogs were harmed. The production used a combination of techniques, including playing with the dogs, filming the dogs from various angles and using prop dogs, to achieve a realistic effect. 

Most Poignant Movie Illustrating the Human-Animal Bond: Marley & Me – If you saw it, you had to dig out some tissues. This movie shows that even an overly rambunctious dog is still a valued and important member of the family, and the loss of a companion animal is truly the loss of a friend.

Best Behind-the-Scenes Rescue Story: Beverly Hills Chihuahua According to Chris Obonsawin, American Humane’s Certified Animal Safety Representative™ on the set of this film, one of the lead dogs who played Papi was a day away from being euthanized before a trainer discovered him in a California animal shelter. The dog now lives with the movie’s head trainer. Many trainers find their animals at animal shelters – trainer Frank Inn adopted a mutt from a California shelter in the 1960s. The mutt became Benji.

Best Group Effort to Protect Horses: Appaloosa In Appaloosa, there is a scene in which men on horses cross a stream, then gallop up a ravine. The Animal Safety Representative, Ed Lish, explained that sending the horses through a stream, where sharp rocks or other dangers might be hidden under the water, would be against American Humane’s guidelines. The entire crew immediately jumped in to scour both the stream and the ravine to clear the way of debris and ensure safety and comfort for the horses.

Best Rescue by a Snake: Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull – When Mutt grabs a vine to save Indy, who is sinking in quicksand, they find themselves grasping a snake. The production used a real python for some gentle “establishing shots”, then brought in a prop substitute for the “real” action.

By:  Daphne Reid/Pet People’s Place

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February 27, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Success Stories, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments