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The Scary-Looking ‘Sea Monster’ That Washed Ashore in New Zealand Finally Identified

The Scary Looking Sea Monster That Washed Ashore in New Zealand Finally Identified

(YouTube)

TheBlaze: The ghastly-looking carcass that recently washed ashore in New Zealand had people speculating that it was some sort of “sea monster” or prehistoric beast. However, as it turns out, it’s just a killer whale — sorry to disappoint you.

Because of its state of significant decay, the whale resembled something scarier than a common sea mammal. Its head was massive and its teeth were large and sharp, but the rest of the creature was unrecognizable.

Video of the “strange marine creature” discovery on Pukehina Beach in the Bay of Plenty was uploaded to YouTube.

But now a marine mammal expert has identified the creature as nothing more than a killer whale, or orca.

Anton van Helden told New Zealand’s Sun Live newspaper that he was able to identify the animal based on its fin structure.

The Yahoo! News blog “GrindTV” has more:

Discovery News reported on the find under the headline: “‘Monster’ Carcass Washes Ashore in New Zealand,” and explained that creatures washing ashore in severe states of decomposition have been misidentified as sea monsters or dinosaurs for generations.

Some of these massive, unidentifiable blobs have been dubbed “blobsters.”

Discovery cites an 1896 incident in which a massive 6-foot-high “fleshy corpse” came ashore at St. Augustine, Florida. After lots of speculation a naturalist decided it belonged to some type of giant octopus, previously unknown to science.

In 2003, a 40-foot, 13-ton creature washed ashore on a beach in Chile. It was labeled by BBC News as the “Chilean Blob” and the remains were presumed by one expert to be those of a giant octopus or squid, and by another as whale blubber.

(H/T: Yahoo! News)

May 8, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Giant eyeball on FL beach

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Photo: (AP) Made available by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission shows a giant eyeball from a mysterious sea creature that washed ashore and was found by a man walking the beach in Pompano Beach, Fla. on Wednesday. No one knows what species the huge blue eyeball came from. The eyeball will be sent to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute in St. Petersburg, FL.

MIAMI (AP) — It’s not that body parts never wash ashore on Florida beaches. But usually it’s not an eye the size of a softball.

State wildlife officials are trying to determine the species of a blue eyeball found by a man Wednesday at Pompano Beach, north of Fort Lauderdale. They put the eyeball on ice so it can be analyzed at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute in St. Petersburg.

Agency spokeswoman Carli Segelson says the eyeball likely came from a marine animal, since it was found on a beach. Possible candidates include a giant squid, a whale or some type of large fish.

October 15, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Unusual Stories | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Alaska… One in a Billion Shot…

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HOLY …  SH_T !!!

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ALASKA

…One In A Billion Shot…

The photo was taken at the entrance to Katlian Bay, at the end of the road, just around the corner from the ferry terminal, in Sitka, Alaska.

The whale is coming up to scoop up a mouthful of herring (the small fish seen at the surface all around the kayak.)

The kayaker is a local Sitka Dentist. All he could think of at that moment in time was:

"Paddle fast–and I do mean paddle really fast…!"

In case you didn’t realize it…, the whale’s mouth is fully open with the bottom half completely under his Kayak…! If the whale had closed his mouth before he had furiously paddled away – he might have been LUNCH…!!!

As the story goes, he apparently didn’t sustain any injuries from the terrifying experience, except that is…, a memory of what happened…, that I don’t think will EVER-EVER go away!!!

h/t to Gary dRat

September 19, 2012 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, animals, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, We Are All God's Creatures, Wild Animals | , , , , | Leave a comment

Beautiful and Unusual Photos of Animals

A seahorse inspects a diver’s watch

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The honeybee’s final sting

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First contact

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Flight of the devil rays

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The stunning green vine snake

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A pod of sleeping sperm whales

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Putting the size of a whale in perspective

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ROFLMAO

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August 10, 2012 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, animals, Just One More Pet, Wild Animals | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Whale

A female humpback whale had become entangled in a spider web of crab traps and lines.

She was weighted down by hundreds of pounds of traps that caused her to struggle to stay afloat. She also had hundreds of yards of line rope wrapped around her body, her tail, her torso, a line tugging in her mouth.

A fisherman spotted her just east of the Faralon Islands (outside the Golden Gate ) and radioed for help.

Within a few hours, the rescue team arrived and determined that she was so bad off, the only way to save her was to dive in and untangle her — a very dangerous proposition. One slap of the tail could kill a rescuer.

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They worked for hours with curved knives and eventually freed her.

When she was free, the divers say she swam in what seemed like joyous circles.  She then came back to each and every diver, one at a time, nudged them, and pushed gently, thanking them.

Some said it was the most incredibly beautiful experience of their lives.

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The guy who cut the rope out of her mouth says her eye was following him the whole time, and he will  never be the same.

May you, and all those you love, be so fortunate…
To be surrounded by people who will help you get untangled from
the things that are binding you.

And, may you always know the joy of giving and receiving gratitude.

I share this with you, in the same spirit… clip_image003

Life is short, Break the rules, Forgive quickly, Kiss slowly, Love truly, Laugh uncontrollably …Never regret anything that made you smile.

Two Friends Sent Me These Two Items Today… Above and Below

–> Video: BP Slick Covers Dolphins and Whales <–

Let us not forget to take a break and laugh… but let us not forget to fight for the things we love and that made us laugh…

Source: Just One More Pet

July 14, 2010 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Success Stories, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , | Leave a comment

25% of Wild Mammal Species Are Imperiled

      

BARCELONA, Oct. 6 — At least a quarter of the world’s wild mammal species are at risk of extinction, according to a comprehensive global survey released here Monday.

The new assessment — which took 1,700 experts in 130 countries five years to complete — paints “a bleak picture,” leaders of the project wrote in a paper being published in the journal Science. The overview, made public at the quadrennial World Conservation Congress of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), covers all 5,487 wild species identified since 1500. It is the most thorough tally of land and marine mammals since 1996.

“Mammals are definitely declining, and the driving factors are habitat destruction and over-harvesting,” said Jan Schipper, the paper’s lead writer and the IUCN’s global mammals assessment coordinator. The researchers concluded that 25 percent of the mammal species for which they had sufficient data are threatened with extinction, but Schipper added that the figure could be as high as 36 percent because information on some species is so scarce.

Land and marine mammals face different threats, the scientists said, and large mammals are more vulnerable than small ones. For land species, habitat loss and hunting represent the greatest danger, while marine mammals are more threatened by unintentional killing by pollution, ship strikes and being caught in fishing nets.

While large species such as primates (including the Sumatran orangutan and red colobus monkeys in Africa) and ungulates (hoofed animals such as Africa’s Dama gazelle and the Malaysian tapir) may seem more physically imposing, the researchers wrote that these animals are more imperiled than smaller creatures such as rodents and bats because they “tend to have lower population densities, slower life histories, and larger home ranges, and are more likely to be hunted.”

Primates face some of the most intense pressures: According to the survey, 79 percent of primates in South and Southeast Asia are facing extinction.

Conservation International President Russell A. Mittermeier, one of the paper’s writers and a primate specialist, said animals in the region are being hit with “a triple whammy.”

“It’s not that surprising, given the high population pressures, the level of habitat destruction, and the fairly extreme hunting of primates for food and medicinal purposes,” he said in an interview. He added that some areas in Vietnam and Cambodia are facing “an empty forest syndrome,” as even once-populous species such as the crab-eating macaque, or temple monkey, are “actually getting vacuumed out of some areas where it was common.

In some cases, the scientists have a precise sense of how imperiled a species has become: There are 19 Hainan gibbons left in the wild on the island off China’s southeast coast, Mittermeier said, which actually counts as progress because there used to be just a dozen.

With others, including the beaked whale and the jaguar, researchers have a much vaguer idea of their numbers despite technological advances — such as satellite and radio tagging, camera tracking and satellite-based GPS (global positioning system) mapping. The authors of the assessment wrote that most land mammals occupy “areas smaller than the United Kingdom,” while “the range of most marine mammals is smaller than one-fifth of the Indian Ocean.”

The report on mammals came on the same day that the IUCN updated its “Red List” — a separate periodic survey of nearly 45,000 species of plants and animals — and concluded that 32 percent are threatened with extinction. Its scientists added 20 of the world’s 161 species of grouper to the list of those at risk of extinction, along with several tarantula species.

Jonathan Baillie, who directs conservation programs at the Zoological Society of London, said: “It’s a continual decline in all cases.”

Not all of the news was grim yesterday: IUCN officials said that the La Palma giant lizard, believed to be extinct for 500 years, was rediscovered last year in the Canary Islands and is now considered critically endangered.

The writers of the mammals assessment said the observed declines are not inevitable. “At least 5 percent of currently threatened species have stable or increasing populations,” they wrote, “which indicates that they are recovering from past threats.”

Said Mittermeier: “It comes down to protecting habitats effectively, through protected areas, and preventing hunting and other forms of exploitation.” As one example of how conservation can be effective, he noted that in areas where scientific researchers work, animals stand a much better chance of surviving. “Where you have a research presence, it’s as good or better than a guard force,” he said.

Schipper offered the model of the U.S. effort to bring back the black-footed ferret, which was essentially extinct on the North American prairie as of 1996. “Now it’s endangered, which, in this case, is a huge improvement,” he said. “When governments and scientists commit resources to a project, many species can be recovered.”

Monday’s reports come as researchers have been documenting effects of human-generated greenhouse gases. In a paper published Thursday in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, a team at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute found that ocean acidification spurred by carbon emissions will cause sound to travel farther underwater, because increasingly acidic seawater absorbs less low- and mid-frequency sound.

By 2050, the researchers predicted, sounds could travel as much as 70 percent farther in parts of the Atlantic Ocean and other areas, which may improve marine mammals’ ability to communicate but also increase background noise, which could prove disorienting.

“We understand the chemistry of the ocean is changing. The biological implications of that we really don’t know,” said ocean chemist Keith Hester, the lead writer. “The magnitude to which sound absorption will change, based mainly on human contribution, is really astounding.”

By Juliet Elperin, Washington Post Staff Writer, Tuesday, October 7, 2008; Page A13

Permalink: http://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2008/10/09/25-of-wild-mam…-are-imperiled/

Posted:  Just One More Pet

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October 9, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Killing Whales To Save Them??

Japanese scientists are worried that climate change is making whales skinnier. But they killed 4,500 whales to get the data, in defiance of international opinion. 

What do you think? Does the end justify the means? And is it good use of resources to butcher those whales and sell the meat?        

The Save the Whales movement has been fairly effective, but so-called “scientific” whale hunting by the Japanese has been the most hated loophole. Now we have some actual, useful scientific results, but at a very high cost. 

Some scientists have argued that the research results shouldn’t have been published, because it was unethical to collect the data through sham research that was thinly disguised commercial whale hunting. 

Whales have been the subject of heated debate for centuries, including a raging controversy in the early 1800’s over whether or not a whale is a fish. What seems like a biological question blew up over religious implications and lucrative taxes on fish products. 

Now will we see whales at the center of another culture clash, the global warming debate? For the sake of whales, I hope not.

Posted by Mark Powell

September 21, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Political Change | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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