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8 Out of 10 Pet Owners Didn’t Recognize These Signs of Illness – Will You?

Story at-a-glance
  • In a study of senior dogs and their owners, it was discovered that parents of older dogs often don’t recognize the signs of age-related illness, or don’t consider them to be serious. Eighty percent of owners involved in the study were unaware of at least one significant health concern with their pet. The dogs in the study averaged about eight health issues each.
  • Most traditional veterinarians wait for their patients to become ill before they intervene. This is very likely the reason owners of aging pets fear visiting the vet, and as a result, many older companion animals don’t get regular check-ups.
  • Proactive wellness-oriented veterinarians like Dr. Becker take an entirely different approach. Their goal is to see pets for wellness exams on a regular basis so they can maintain their patients in good health, and catch developing diseases before they become full-blown.
  • Ideally pet owners can team up with a local veterinarian who takes a proactive approach to the health of animals. When your pet’s health is carefully monitored throughout his or her life, it makes vet exams much less daunting as your furry companion gets up in years.
  • There are also many things you can do at home to help your aging pet remain comfortable and in good health.

Aging Pet

By Dr. Becker

Many veterinarians rely entirely on the owners of senior pets to report signs of age-related illness. (I’m not one of them, because my approach is proactive rather than reactive, and my focus is on preventing illness — not waiting until it occurs.) Unfortunately, many pet parents don’t recognize the signs, or consider changes in their dog’s or cat’s health normal if the symptoms seem related to the animal’s advancing age.

In fact, in a study published recently in the Journal of Small Animal Practice1, it was revealed that the vast majority (80 percent) of owners of dogs older than nine years of age were not aware of at least one significant health problem with their pet.

Study Suggests Most Older Dogs Have Unaddressed Health Problems

The study involved veterinary consultations with the owners of 45 senior dogs. The vet sessions consisted of taking a history of the dog’s health and lifestyle, a full physical examination, and urinalysis.

The history taking was standardized so that the owners were asked the same questions about changes they had noticed as their pet aged. A prompted history taking was also completed using open questions, followed by appropriate closed questions. The physical exam evaluated all organ systems, and the urinalysis included a dipstick urine test and specific gravity.

The 45 dogs in the study were discovered to have an average of about eight health issues each, including ear infections, respiratory distress, arthritis, abdominal masses, heart murmurs or arrhythmias, and lung cancer. According to study authors, the dogs’ owners frequently did not recognize or report serious signs of disease, however, they did report symptoms like increased sleeping, hearing or vision loss, stiffness or lameness, “slowing down,” increased cloudiness of the lens of the eye, increased thirst and urination, pain, signs of osteoarthritis, and dental disease.

As a result of the screenings, 29 further diagnostic procedures were ordered including 10 dental procedures, seven medical treatments, two surgeries, and sadly, the euthanasia of two dogs.

How to Conquer Your Fear of Vet Exams for Your Aging Pet

I think it’s normal for owners of beloved older pets to grow more fearful of vet appointments as their dog, cat, or other animal companion ages. The more years on the pet, the more likely a serious health problem will be diagnosed during a veterinary exam. But I think this view is much more prevalent in clients of traditional vet practices, because the conventional veterinary community is trained to wait for full-blown illness before intervening in an animal’s health.

In my proactive wellness-oriented practice and others like it, long-term clients are less fearful when they bring their elderly companions in for checkups because we (the pet parent and I) have worked as a team throughout the animal’s life to address potential health issues as soon as they arise.

My most vibrant, longest-lived patients are those whose owners not only provide a healthy lifestyle for their pets, but also bring them to my clinic for regular wellness exams – especially as they get up in years or if we are managing current medical issues. The frequency and regularity of their visits allows us to get to work on a developing disorder early in its progression, when there is the best chance for an excellent outcome.

We also review the animal’s nutritional, supplement and medication protocols at each visit and make adjustments as necessary. This allows us to, for example, know when the time is right to begin specific supplementation to prevent or slow the progress of age-related changes like loss of vision, osteoarthritis, and mental decline.

No matter your companion animal’s age, I strongly encourage you to find a wellness-oriented holistic or integrative veterinarian in your area (or at least within driving distance) – a DVM who practices a proactive approach to caring for your pet’s health. The two of you, as a team, can then set about taking steps to keep your furry friend healthy, rather than simply waiting in fear for a dreadful diagnosis.

Tips for Helping Your Pet Age Well

No matter your pet’s age, certainly the foundation for good health and vitality is a nutritionally balanced, species-appropriate diet. The food your dog eats either builds up or tears down his health. His body needs an ideal energy source to promote the processes of metabolism, growth and healing. That perfect fuel is a healthy variety of fresh, living food suitable for your carnivorous canine. And pets’ nutritional needs change as they age.

To help with failing eyesight:

  • Bilberries are a rich source of flavonoids with antioxidant properties. When taken in capsule form combined with Vitamin E, they protect the eye tissue of humans and halt lens clouding in 97 percent of people with early-stage cataracts. This herb is safe for dogs, so it’s certainly something that might help and won’t harm your pet.
  • Leave a radio, television or other background noise on when your pet will be home alone. This will give her a reference point, and should also help mute noises that may startle her.
  • Avoid moving furniture around, keep household ‘travel lanes’ clear, and minimize clutter. The easier it is for your pet to navigate through the house, the less likely it is she’ll become disoriented or injure herself. Cover up slippery floors so your pet will feel secure walking on them.
  • Use natural scents like aromatherapy products (I use lavender oil) to ‘mark’ special spots in the house, for example your pet’s water dish.
  • Don’t move your pet’s feeding station around, and if your companion is a cat, don’t move the litter box from place to place. A familiar environment and daily routine are especially important to elderly pets with diminished faculties.

For arthritic pets:

  • Maintaining your dog at a healthy weight and insuring he’s physically active throughout his life will help control arthritis and degenerative joint disease in his later years.
  • Cover slick floors (most tile, linoleum, hard wood) with non-skid rugs or runners to prevent dogs from slipping.
  • Chiropractic adjustments, massage, stretching, aquatic therapy, laser therapy and acupuncture are therapies that can make a world of difference in the mobility of your pet as he ages. Talk with your holistic/integrative vet about supplements you can add to your dog’s diet to help maintain healthy tendons, ligaments, joints and cartilage. Some of these might include:
    • Glucosamine sulfate with MSM and eggshell membrane
    • Omega-3 fats (krill oil)
    • Ubiquinol
    • Supergreen foods like spirulina and astaxanthin
    • Natural anti-inflammatory formulas (herbs, proteolytic enzymes and nutraceuticals)
    • Adequan injections, which can stimulate joint fluid very rapidly in pets with arthritis

To keep your dog mentally sharp:

  • Enrich your dog’s environment with regular exercise, mental stimulation and socialization with other pets and people. In a two-year study of senior beagles, researchers found dogs that engaged in regular physical exercise, playtime with other pups and stimulating toys, did better on cognitive tests and learning new tasks than their less active counterparts.
  • Give your dog a SAMe (S-adenosylmethionine) supplement. SAMe is a safe and very effective way to stall or improve mental decline. In one recent study, dogs with age-related cognitive decline given a SAMe supplement for eight weeks showed a 50 percent reduction in mental impairment. Consult your pet’s veterinarian for the right dose size for your dog.
  • Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) have been shown to improve brain energy metabolism and decrease the amyloid protein buildup that results in brain lesions in older dogs. Coconut oil is a rich source of MCTs. I recommend 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of body weight twice daily for basic MCT support.
  • Other supplements to consider are resveratrol (Japanese Knotweed), which protects against free radical damage and beta-amyloid deposits, ginkgo biloba, and phosphatidylserine – a nutritional supplement that can inhibit age-related cognitive deficits. Again, I recommend you consult a holistic veterinarian for dosing guidance.

Give your pets a head start for a healthier, happier and longer life with StemPets and StemEquine – Stem Cell Enhancers for Pets

Book: Pukka’s Promise: The Quest for Longer-Lived Dogs

Related:

Acupuncture for Dogs (Pets)

Alternative Dog Arthritis Treatment Series Part 1 – An Introduction

Dog and Cat Vaccines are Not Harmless Preventive Medicine

Laser Therapy is Good Medicine for Humans and Their Companion Animals… Any Animals

Natural Pet Remedies For Everyday Problems

Dog Massage? Isn’t Petting Enough?

Pet owners get the point of acupuncture

Struggling families can now apply for nonprofit’s Pet Food Stamps

Part 2 of Dr. Becker’s Interview with Bestselling Author Ted Kerasote: The Seven Factors that Determine How Long Your Dog Will Live

Pukka’s Promise: The Quest for Longer-Lived Dogs, by Bestselling Author Ted Kerasote – Available in Bookstores This Week!

Pet Food Red Flags You Want to Avoid

Surprise, Surprise… the Best Food for Dogs Is Homemade Food

Part 3 of Dr. Becker’s Interview with Bestselling Author Ted Kerasote: Fixing America’s Broken Animal Shelter System

Pet Age

The Nutrient Your Pet Needs More of As They Age: Protein

March 1, 2013 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Is Secondhand Smoke Killing Your Cat?

Recent studies confirm Dr. Sullivan’s assertion, warning that secondhand smoke may lead to deadly diseases in your cat. So if personal health risks haven’t compelled you and your houseguests to quit smoking yet, there is a new incentive: the well-being of your cat.

Consider the Dangers
The health risks associated with inhaling secondhand smoke have proved to be just as worrisome for cats as they are for people. But unlike you, your cat doesn’t have the choice to escape the environment to get fresher air, says Shera Dickie, DVM, of St. Julian’s Cat Care, in Dearborn, Mich. What’s more, pollutants from the smoky air collect on your pet’s coat. Since cats are meticulous groomers, they can easily ingest these harmful substances as they lick their fur.

According to a Swedish study cited by Dr. Dickie, “six out of seven cats that lived in a smoking home had pathological changes in their lungs.” These changes foretold the emergence of cancer for the majority of the cats. Here are a few other diseases your cat runs the risk of developing if regularly exposed to secondhand smoke:

Malignant Lymphoma
This aggressive type of cancer occurs in the lymph nodes and can be fatal. In fact, “Three out of four cats with this disease are dead within a year of diagnosis,” says Dr. Dickie. Cats living with smokers are twice as likely to get this disease, and the risk elevates with increased exposure.

Squamous Cell Carcinoma
This type of cancer plagues a cat’s mouth. A study conducted at Tufts College of Veterinary Medicine found there is a higher incidence of this illness among cats living with smokers for more than five years.

Nicotine Poisoning
Feline explorers drawn to unknown objects, like a forgotten cigarette butt, are especially threatened by nicotine poisoning. The affliction occurs when a cat ingests tobacco. Cigarette butts contain much harmful nicotine – about 25 percent of the nicotine of a whole cigarette – so even a small cigarette butt can lead to the death of a cat.

Asthma
Cats exposed to secondhand smoke are not only more susceptible to asthma, but they also “tend to heal slower from respiratory diseases, such as viral infections and pneumonia,” notes Dr. Sullivan. Increased coughing and breathing difficulty is a possible sign that your kitty suffers around secondhand smoke.

What Can You Do Now?
Proactive, responsible owners have many options to protect their cat from secondhand smoke. But how do you do that if you can’t quit smoking so easily? Here are

Designate Smoke-Free Areas
Consider smoking outside, or smoke only in rooms that pets are not allowed in. The less the exposure, the greater the chances your cat will stay healthy.

Use Air Filters
Air filters may help clean the environment, removing harmful chemicals in the air that could block your kitty’s respiratory passage.

Clean Your Pet And Your House
Regular baths, or at the very least wipe-downs with a damp cloth, can help remove smoke residue from cat fur, says Dr. Dickie. Vacuum and keep all cigarette butts, tobacco products and even nicotine patches out of sight to prevent accidental illness, poisoning or even death.

Look For Symptoms
Excessive drooling or difficulty eating are symptoms of oral cancer, while labored breathing is a sign of lung cancer. Observe your cat frequently, since catching diseases early on always helps with treatment. If something is out of the ordinary, contact your veterinarian immediately.

The best solution of all? Quitting if you’re a smoker – and encouraging cigarette-carrying visitors to do the same. In the words of Dr. Dickie: “Why expose your beloved furry friend to a potentially preventable disease?”

by Natalia Macrynikola

Source:  Pet People’s Place

(These same dangers apply for any and all animals and pets, especally indoor or house pets that are regularly exposed!)

Posted:  Just One More Pet

May 22, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pets and Toxic Plants

Dangerous Household Plants For Dogs

bird-of-paradise-caesalpinia

Dieffenbachia, Philodendron & Caladium can cause problems in the dog’s upper gastrointestinal tract. Do not induce vomiting. Give milk or water to rinse the dog’s mouth and throat. Take the dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Amaryllis, Daffodil, Mistletoe, Tulip, Wisteria, English Ivy, Alfalfa, Beech, Iris, Bird of Paradise, Crown of Thorns, Honeysuckle, Castor Bean, Nightshades & the Potato’s green parts and eyes cause irritation in the lower gastrointestinal tract that can lead to death. Induce vomiting by giving 1 teaspoon syrup of ipecac or 1 tablespoon of a 1:1 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water. Follow with a crushed tablet of activated charcoal, which can be purchased at a drug store and should be kept in your pet’s first aid kit. Take your dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Foxglove, Lily of the Valley, Oleander, Monkshood & Larkspur affect the dog’s cardiovascular system. The digitalis glycosides in these plants have a severe depressant effect on the heart. Take your dog to the veterinarian immediately.

Yews, Tobacco, Hemlock, Rhubarb, Belladonna, Jimsonweed, Chinaberry & Morning Glory affect the dog’s nervous system. Induce vomiting by giving 1 teaspoon syrup of ipecac or 1 tablespoon of a 1:1 mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water. Take the dog to the veterinarian immediately. Specific antidotes may be needed to counteract the effects of the poisonous chemicals found in these plants.

If you discover that your dog has been eating a houseplant or suspicious outdoor plant call your poison control center and get veterinary help. If you don’t know the name of the plant, take a sample of it to the veterinarian.

To prevent plant poisoning, do not keep poisonous plants in your home or yard. Keep dried arrangements out of reach. Be sure your puppy has plenty of safe chew dog toys.

Plants and Pets
Toxic Listing

Because of their small size and unique metabolism, cats (especially) and dogs tend to be highly sensitive to poisonous plants. Many toxic substances require quick home treatment followed by immediate veterinary care. Veterinary follow up is critical to prevent secondary effects of the poison. A veterinarian can also monitor the pet for complications.

It’s important to note that because of the huge number of plants in existence, the following listing can’t possibly address every plant that is or may be toxic to your pet. Some plants that are generally considered to be nontoxic may cause severe symptoms in a pet with an allergy to the plant. Some plants that are not toxic could be sprayed with poisonous chemicals. Therefore, you should be concerned whenever your pet eats any type of plant and shows any signs of abnormalcy in his or her behavior or digestive system; you should contact your veterinarian immediately.

The Non-Toxic Plant Listing is located here: Non-Toxic Plant Listing.

 

TOXIC PLANTS FOR PETS

Acacia (all parts)
Acocanthera (flowers, fruit)
Aconite (also called Monkshood, Wolfsbane – leaves, flowers, roots)
Acorns (all parts)
Agapanthus (all parts)
Alfalfa (also called Lucerne – foliage)
Almond (seeds)
Aloe Vera (also called Burn Plant – sap)
Alocasia (all parts)
Alsike Clover (foliage)
Amanita (also called Death Camas, Meadow Death Camas – all parts)
Amaryllis (also called Naked Lady – bulbs)
American Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Amsinckia (also called Tarweed – all above ground, especially seeds)
Andromeda Japonica (all parts)
Angel Vine (also called Mattress Vine, Wire Vine – all parts)
Angel’s Trumpet (also called Chalice Vine, Datura, Trumpet Vine – all parts, especially seeds)
Angel’s Wings (also called Elephant Ears – leaves, stems, roots)
Antherium (also called Flamingo Lily, Painter’s Palette – leaves, stems, roots)
Apple (seeds)
Apple of Peru (also called Thornapple, Flowering Tolguacha – all parts, especially seeds)
Apple Leaf Croton (all parts)
Apricot (inner seed)
Arrowgrass (foliage)
Arrowhead Vine (also called Nepthytis, Tri-Leaf Wonder – leaves, stems, roots)
Asian Lily (Liliaceae – all parts)
Asparagus Fern (shoots, berries)
Australian Nut (all parts)
Autumn Crocus (also called Crocus – all parts)
Avocado (fruit, pit, leaves)
Azalea (all parts)
Baby’s Breath (all parts)
Baneberry (also called Doll’s Eyes – foliage, red/white berries, roots)
Banewort (also called Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Bayonet Plant (foliage, flowers)
Beargrass (all parts)
Beech (all parts)
Belladonna (also called Banewort, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Bird of Paradise (seeds, fruit)
Bitter Cherry (seeds)
Bitter Nightshade (also called Climbing Nightshade, Bittersweet, European Bittersweet – all parts, especially berries)
Bittersweet (also called Bitter Nightshade, Climbing Nightshade, European Bittersweet – all parts, especially berries)
Black Cherry (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Black-Eyed Susan (all parts)
Black Locust (leaves, shoots, pods, seeds, inner bark)
Black Nightshade (also called Common Nightshade, Nightshade – unripe berries)
Blackie (also called Morning Glory, Sweet Potato Vine – all parts)
Bleeding Heart (foliage, roots)
Bloodroot (all parts)
Blue Flag (also called Flag, Fleur-de-lis, Iris – bulbs)
Blue-Green Algae (all parts)
Bluebonnet (also called Lupine, Quaker Bonnets – all parts)
Boston Ivy (leaves, berries)
Bouncing Bet (also called Soapwort – all parts)
Box (all parts)
Boxwood (all parts)
Brackenfern; Braken Fern (also called Brake Fern – all parts)
Brake Fern (also called Brakenfern, Braken Fern – all parts)
Branching Ivy (leaves, berries)
Buckeye (also called Ohio Buckey, Horse Chestnut – buds, nuts, leaves, bark, seedlings, honey)
Buckthorn (all parts)
Buddhist Pine (all parts)
Bulbs (all species in the families Amarylliaceae, Iridaceae, Liliaceae – bulbs)
Bull Nettle (also called Carolina Nettle, Horse Nettle – all parts)
Burn Plant (also called Aloe Vera – sap)
Buttercups (also called Crowfoot – new leaves, stems)
Cactus (leaves, stem, milky sap)
Caladium (all parts)
Caley Pea (all parts)
Calfkill (all parts)
Calla Lily (all parts)
Camphor Tree (all parts)
Candelabra Cactus (also called False Cactus – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Candleberry Tree (also called Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Carolina Horsenettle (also called Bull Nettle, Horse Nettle – all parts)
Carolina Jessamine (also called Yellow Jessamine, Yellow Jasmine – all parts)
Castilleja (also called Indian Paintbrush – all parts, especially green parts, roots)
Castor Oil Plant (also called Castor Bean – all parts, especially seeds)
Castor Bean (also called Castor Oil Plant – all parts, especially seeds)
Ceriman (also called Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese (leaves, stems, roots)
Chalice Vine (also called Angel’s Trumpet, Trumpet Vine – all parts)
Charming Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Cherry (also called Bitter Cherry, Choke Cherry, Ground Cherry, Pin Cherry, Wild Black Cherry, most wild varieties – all parts)
Cherry Laurel (foliage, flowers)
Chicken-Foot Tree (also called Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, Candleberry Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Chicks (all parts)
Chinaberry Tree (berries)
Chinese Evergreen (leaves, stems, roots)
Chinese Inkberry (also called Jessamine – fruit, sap)
Chinese Lantern (leaf, unripe fruit)
Chinese Tallowtree (also called Chicken-Foot, Popcorn Tree, Candleberry Tree, White Wax Berry, Florida Aspen – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Chlorophytum (all parts)
Choke Cherry (seeds, bark)
Christmas Flower (also called Christmas Plant, Easter Flower, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Christmas Plant (also called Christmas Flower, Easter Flower, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Christmas Rose (foliage, flowers)
Chrysanthemum (also called Feverfew, Mum – all parts)
Cineraria (all parts)
Cineria (all parts)
Clematis (all parts)
Climbing Nightshade (also called Bitter Nightshade, Bittersweet, European Bittersweet – all parts)
Clover (also called Alsike Clover, Red Clover, White Clover – foliage)
Cocklebur (seeds, seedlings, burs)
Coffee Tree Plant (all parts)
Common Burdock (burs)
Common Nightshade (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Common Privet (foliage, berries)
Common Tansy (foliage, flowers)
Coral Plant (all parts)
Cordatum (all parts)
Coriaria (all parts)
Corn Lily (also called False Hellebore, Western False Hellebore – all parts)
Corn Plant (also called Cornstalk Plant – all parts)
Cornflower (all parts)
Cornstalk Plant (also called Corn Plant – all parts)
Corydalis (leaves, stems, roots)
Cowslip (new leaves, stems)
Crab’s Eye (also called Jequirity Bean, Precatory Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Creeping Charlie (all parts)
Crocus (also called Autumn Crocus – all parts)
Croton (foliage, shoots)
Crowfoot (also called Buttercup – new leaves, stems)
Crown of Thorns (all parts)
Cuban Laurel (all parts)
Cuckoo Pint (also called Lords and Ladies – all parts)
Cultivated Bleeding Heart (leaves, stems, roots)
Cultivated Larkspur (all parts)
Cutleaf Philodendron (also called Ceriman, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Cycads (all parts)
Cyclamen (foliage, flowers, stems)
Cypress Spurge (foliage, flowers, sap)
Daffodil (also called Jonquil, Narcissus – all parts)
Daphne (berries, bark, leaves)
Datura (all parts)
Day Lily (all parts)
Deadly Nightshade (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Death Camas (also called Amanita, Meadow Death Camas – all parts)
Death Cap Mushroom (all parts)
Decentrea (all parts)
Delphinium (also called Larkspur – all parts)
Destroying Angel Mushroom (also called Amanita – all parts)
Devil’s Backbone (also called Kalanchoe – leaves, stems)
Devil’s Cherries (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Devil’s Herb (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Devil’s Ivy (also called Golden Pothos, Pothos – all parts)
Devil’s Trumpet (also called Datura – all parts)
Dieffenbachia (also call Dumb Cane – all parts)
Divale (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Dogbane (leaves, stems, roots)
Doll’s Eyes (also called Baneberry – foliage, red/white berries, roots)
Dracaena (also called Dragon Tree – foliage) Dracaena Palm (foliage)
Dragon Tree (also called Dracaena – foliage)
Dumbcane (also called Aroids – leaves, stems, roots)
Dutchman’s Breeches (also called Staggerweed – leaves, stems, roots)
Dwale (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Dwarf Larkspur (also called Larkspur, Poisonweed – all parts)
Dwayberryall (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Great Morel, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Easter Flower (also called Christmas Flower, Christmas Plant, Poinsettia – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Easter Lily (leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Eggplant (all parts but fruit)
Elaine (all parts)
Elderberry (all parts)
Elephant Ears (also called Angel’s Wings – leaves, stems, roots)
Emerald Duke (also called Majesty, Philodendron, Red Princess – all parts)
Emerald Feather (also called Emerald Fern – all parts)
Emerald Fern (also called Emerald Feather – all parts)
English Ivy (leaves, berries)
English Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Ergot (fungus on seed heads of grains and grasses)
Eucalyptus (all parts)
Euonymus (all parts)
Euphorbia (foliage, flowers, sap)
European Bittersweet (also called Bitter Nightshade, Bittersweet, Climbing Nightshade – all parts)
European Spindle Tree (all parts)
Evergreen (all parts)
Everlasting Pea (all parts)
False Cactus (also called Candelabra Cactus – leaves, stem, milky sap)
False Flax (seeds)
False Hellbore (also called Corn Lily, Western False Hellebore – all parts)
Fan Weed (seeds)
Ferns (all parts)
Feverfew (also called Chrysanthemum, Mum – leaves, stalks)
Ficus (sap, peel)
Fiddle-Leaf Fig (all parts)
Fiddle-Leaf Philodendron (all parts)
Fiddleneck (also called Tarweed – all parts above ground)
Field Peppergrass (seeds)
Fitweed (all parts)
Flag (also called Blue Flag, Fleur-de-lis, Iris – bulbs)
Flamingo Plant (all parts)
Flax (foliage and seed pods)
Fleur-de-lis (also called Blue Flag, Flag, Iris – bulbs)
Florida Aspen (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Popcorn Tree, White Wax Berry – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Florida Beauty (all parts)
Fly Agaric (also called Amanita – all parts)
Four O’Clock (all parts)
Foxglove (leaves, stems, flowers, seeds)
Foxtail Barley (also called Squirreltail Barley, Wild Barley – seedheads)
Fruit Salad Plant (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Gelsemium (foliage, flowers, berries, sap)
Geranium (all parts)
German Ivy (all parts above ground)
Ghost Weed (also called Snow on the Mountain – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Giant Dumbcane (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Gill-Over-The-Ground (all parts)
Glacier Ivy (leaves, berries)
Gladiola (bulbs)
Glory Lily (all parts)
Gold Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Gold Dust Dracaena (foliage)
Golden Chain (also called Laburnum – flowers, seeds)
Golden Pothos (also called Devil’s Ivy, Pothos – all parts)
Gopher Purge (all parts)
Grapes (all parts; also see Raisins)
Greaseweed (all parts)
Great Morel (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Naughty Man’s Cherries – all parts, especially black berries)
Green Dragon (also called Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Indian Turnip – leaves, stems, roots)
Green False Hellebore (also called Indian Poke, White Hellebore – all parts)
Green Gold Nephthysis (all parts)
Ground Ivy (all parts)
Groundsel (also called Ragwort, Tansy Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Hahn’s Self-branching English Ivy (leaves, berries)
Halogeton (all parts)
Heartleaf (also called Parlor Ivy, Philodendron – all parts)
Heartland Philodendron (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Heavenly Bamboo (all parts)
Hellebore (foliage, flowers)
Hemlock (also called Poison Hemlock, Water Hemlock – all parts)
Henbane (seeds)
Hens-and-Chicks (all parts)
Hibiscus (all parts)
Holly (berries)
Honeysuckle (all parts)
Horse Nettle (also called Bull Nettle, Carolina Horsenettle – all parts)
Horse Chestnut (also called Buckeye, Ohio Buckeye – buds, nuts, leaves, bark, seedlings, honey)
Horsebeans
Horsebrush (foliage)
Horsehead Philodendron (all parts)
Horsetail (also called Scouringrush – all parts)
Hurricane Plant (bulbs)
Hyacinth (bulbs, leaves, flowers)
Hydrangea (all parts)
Impatiens (also called Touch-me-not – all parts)
Indian Laurel (all parts)
Indian Paintbrush (also called Castilleja – all parts, especially green parts, roots)
Indian Poke (also called Green False Hellebore, White Hellebore – all parts)
Indian Rubber Plant (all parts)
Indian Tobacco (all parts)
Indian Turnip (also called Green Dragon, Jack-in-the-Pulpit – leaves, stems, roots)
Inkberry (also called Pokeweed – all parts)
Iris (also called Blue Flag, Flag, Fleur-de-lis – bulbs)
Iris Ivy (all parts)
Ivy (all species – leaves, berries)
Jack-in-the-Pulpit (also called Green Dragon, Indian Turnip – leaves, stems, roots)
Jamestown Weed (also called Jimsonweed – all parts)
Janet Craig Dracaena (foliage)
Japanese Show Lily (all parts)
Japanese Yew (also called Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Jasmine (foliage, flowers, sap)
Jatropha (seeds, sap)
Java Bean (also called Lima Bean – uncooked beans)
Jequirity Bean (also called Crab’s Eye, Precatory Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Jerusalem Cherry (all parts)
Jessamine (also called Chinese Inkberry – fruit, sap)
Jimson Weed (also called Jamestown Weed – all parts)
Johnson Grass (leaves, stems)
Jonquil (also called Daffodil, Narcissus – all parts)
Juniper (needles, stems, berries)
Jungle Trumpets (all parts)
Kalanchoe (also called Devil’s Backbone – leaves, stems)
Klamath Weed (also called St. Johnswort – all parts)
Laburnum (also called Golden Chain – flowers, seeds)
Lace Fern (all parts)
Lacy Tree Philodendron (all parts)
Lambkill (also called Sheep Laurel – all parts)
Lantana (also called Lantana Camara, Red Sage, West Indian Lantana, Yellow Sage – foliage, flowers, berries)
Lantana Camara (also called Red Sage, Yellow Sage – foliage, flowers, berries)
Larkspur (also called Delphinium – all parts)
Laurel (all parts)
Lilies (all species – all parts)
Lily-of-the-Valley (all parts)
Lily Spider (all parts)
Lima Bean (also called Java Bean – uncooked beans)
Lobelia (all parts)
Locoweed (all parts)
Lords and Ladies (also called Cuckoo Pint – all parts)
Lucerne (also called Alfalfa – foliage)
Lupine (also called Bluebonnet, Quaker Bonnets – all parts)
Macadamia Nut (all parts)
Madagascar Dragon Tree (foliage)
Majesty (also called Emerald Duke, Philodendron, Red Princess – all parts)
Manchineel Tree (sap, fruit)
Mandrake (also called Mayapple – all but ripe fruit)
Marble Queen (all parts)
Marigold (also called Marsh Marigold – new leaves, stems)
Marsh Marigold (also called Marigold – new leaves, stems)
Mattress Vine (also called Angel Vine, Wire Vine – all parts)
Mauna Loa Peace Lily (also called Peace Lily – all parts)
Mayapple (also called Mandrake – all but ripe fruit)
Meadow Death Camas (also called Amanita, Death Camas – all parts)
Mescal Bean (also called Texas Mountain Laurel – all parts)
Mexican Breadfruit (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Mexican Poppy (also called Prickly Poppy – all parts)
Milk Bush (also called Euphorbia, Tinsel Tree – all parts)
Milk Vetch (all parts)
Milkweed (leaves, stems, roots)
Milo (foliage)
Miniature Croton (foliage, shoots)
Mistletoe (berries)
Mock Orange (fruit)
Monkshood (also called Aconite, Wolfsbane – leaves, flowers, roots)
Moonseed (berries)
Morning Glory (also called Blackie, Sweet Potato Vine – all parts)
Mother-in-Law Tongue (also called Snake Plant – foliage)
Mountain Laurel (also called Lambkill, Sheep Laurel – all parts)
Mountain Mahogany (leaves)
Mushrooms (also called Amanita, Death Cap, Destroying Angel, Fly Agaric, Panther Cap, Spring Amanita – all parts)
Nap-at-Noon (also called Snowdrop, Star of Bethlehem – all parts)
Narcissus (all parts)
Naughty Man’s Cherries – (also called Banewort, Belladonna, Black Cherry, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade, Devil’s Cherries, Devil’s Herb, Divale, Dwale, Dwayberryall, Great Morel – all parts, especially black berries)
Needlepoint Ivy (leaves, berries)
Nephthytis (also called Arrowhead Vine, Tri-Leaf Wonder – leaves, stems, roots)
Nettles (all parts)
Nicotiana (leaves)
Nightshade (also called Black Nightshade, Common Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade – all parts, especially berries)
Nutmeg (nut)
Oak (buds, young shoots, sprouts, acorns)
Oleander (all parts)
Onion (all parts)
Orange Day Lily (all parts)
Oriental Lily (all parts)
Panda (all parts)
Panther Cap Mushroom (also called Amanita – all parts)
Parlor Ivy (also called Heartleaf, Philodendron- all parts)
Peace Lily (also called Mauna Loa Peace Lily – all parts)
Peach (pits, wilting leaves)
Pencil Cactus (all parts)
Pennyroyal (foliage, flowers)
Peony (foliage, flowers)
Periwinkle (all parts)
Peyote (also called Mescal – buttons)
Philodendron (also called Heartland Philodendron – leaves, stems, roots)
Pie Plant (also called Rhubarb – leaves, uncooked stems)
Pigweed (all parts)
Pimpernel (foliage, flowers, fruit)
Pin Cherry (seeds)
Pinks (all parts)
Plumosa Fern (all parts)
Poinsettia (also called Christmas Flower, Christmas Plant, Easter Flower – [low toxicity] leaves, stem, milky sap)
Poison Hemlock (also called Hemlock – all parts)
Poison Ivy (all parts)
Poison Oak (all parts)
Poison Weed (also called Dwarf Lakspur, Larkspur, Delphinium – all parts)
Pokeberry (all parts)
Pokeweed (also called Inkberry – all parts)
Popcorn Tree (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Florida Aspen, White Wax

Berry – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Poppy (all parts)
Potato (sprouts, vines, unripe tubers)
Pothos (also called Devil’s Ivy, Golden Pothos – all parts)
Precatory Bean (also called Crab’s Eye, Jequirity Bean, Rosary Pea – beans)
Prickly Poppy (also called Mexican Poppy – all parts)
Primrose (all parts)
Privet (also called Common Privet – foliage, berries)
Psilcybin Mushroom (all parts)
Purple Foxglove (all parts)
Quaker Bonnets (also called Lupine, Blue Bonnet – all parts)
Queensland Nut (all parts)
Ragwort (also called Groundsel, Tansy Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Rain Tree (all parts)
Raisins (also see Grapes)
Rattle Box (entire plant)
Red Clover (foliage)
Red Emerald (all parts)
Red Lily (all parts)
Red Margined Dracaena (also called Straight Margined Dracaena – all parts)
Red Maple (leaves)
Red Princess (also called Emerald Duke, Majesty, Philodendron – all parts)
Red Sage (foliage, flowers, berries)
Red-Margined Dracaena (foliage)
Rhododendron (also called Azalea – all parts)
Rhubarb (also called Pie Plant – leaves, uncooked stems)
Ribbon Plant (foliage)
Richweed (also called White Snakeroot, White Sanicle – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
Rosary Pea (also called Crab’s Eye, Jequirity Bean, Precatory Bean – beans)
Rosemary Pea (all parts)
Rubber Plant (all parts)
Rubrum Lily (all parts)
Saddle Leaf (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Sago Palm (all parts)
Satin Pothos (all parts)
Schefflera (also called Philodendron – all parts)
Scotch Broom (all parts)
Scouringrush (also called Horsetail – all parts)
Senecio (all parts above ground)
Sensitive Fern (all parts)
Sheep Laurel (also called Lambkill – all parts)
Silver Pothos (all parts)
Silver Queen (also called Chinese Evergreen – leaves, stems, roots)
Singletary Pea (all parts)
Skunk Cabbage (leaves, stems, roots)
Smartweeds (seeds)
Snake Plant (also called Mother-in-law’s Tongue – all parts)
Snapdragon (foliage, flowers)
Snow on the Mountain (also called Ghost Weed – leaves, stem, milky sap)
Snowdrop (also called Nap-at-Noon, Star of Bethlehem – all parts)
Soapwort (also called Bouncing Bet – all parts)
Sorghum (foliage)
Spathiphyllum (also called Peace Lily – leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Split-leaf Philodendron (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Swiss Cheese Plant – leaves, stems, roots)
Spotted Cowbane (also called Water Hemlock, Spotted Water Hemlock – all parts)
Spotted Dumb Cane (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Spotted Water Hemlock (also called Spotted Cowbane, Water Hemlock – all parts)
Spring Amanita (also called Amanita – all parts)
Spurges (also called Euphorbia, Milk Bush, Tinsel Tree – all parts)
Squirrelcorn (leaves, stems, roots)
Squirreltail Barley (also called Foxtail Barley, Wild Barley – seedheads)
St. Johnswort (also called Klamath Weed – all parts)
Staggerweed (also called Bleeding Heart, Dutchman’s Breeches – leaves, stems, roots
Star Jasmine (foliage, flowers)
Star of Bethlehem (also called Snowdrop, Nap-at-Noon – all parts)
Stargazer Lily (all parts)
Stinging Nettle (also called Wood Nettle – leaves, stems)
String of Pearls (all parts above ground)
Straight Margined Dracaena (also called Red Margined Dracaena – all parts)
Striped Dracaena (foliage)
Sudan Grass (all parts)
Sweet Cherry (seeds)
Sweet Pea (all parts)
Sweet Potato Vine (also called Blackie, Morning Glory – all parts)
Sweetheart Ivy (leaves, berries)
Swiss Cheese Plant (also called Ceriman, Cut-leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron – leaves, stems, roots)
Syngonium (all parts)
Tangier Pea (all parts)
Tansy Mustard (all parts)
Tansy Ragwort (also called Grounsel, Ragwort – all parts above ground)
Taro Vine (leaves, stems, roots)
Tarweed (also called Amsinckia – all parts above ground)
Texas Mountain Laurel (also called Mescal Bean – all parts)
Thornapple (also called Apple of Peru, Flowering Tolguacha – all parts)
Tiger Lily (leaves, stems, flowers, bulbs)
Tinsel Tree (also called Euphorbia, Milk Bush – all parts)
Tobacco (leaves)
Tolguacha – flowering (also called Apple of Peru, Thornapple – all parts)
Tomato (foliage, vines, green fruit)
Touch-Me-Not (also called Impatiens – all parts)
Toyon (all parts)
Tree Philodendron (leaves, stems, roots)
Tri-Leaf Wonder (also called Arrowhead Vine, Nepthytis – leaves, stems, roots)
Trillium (foliage)
Tropic Snow Dieffenbachia (also called Dieffenbachia – all parts)
Trumpet Lily (all parts)
Trumpet Vine (also called Angel’s Trumpet, Chalice Vine – all parts)
Tulip (bulbs)
Tung Oil Tree (all parts)
Tung Tree (all parts)
Umbrella Plant (all parts)
Variable Dieffenbachia (all parts)
Variegated Philodendron (all parts)
Variegated Wandering Jew (leaves)
Velvet Grass (leaves)
Velvet Lupine (all parts)
Venus Flytrap (all parts)
Verbena (foliage, flowers)
Vinca Vine (all parts)
Virginia Creeper (sap)
Walnut (green hulls)
Wandering Jew (leaves)
Warneckei Dracaena (all parts)
Water Hemlock (also called Spotted Cowbane, Spotted Water Hemlock – all parts)
Weeping Fig (all parts)
West Indian Lantana (foliage, flowers, berries)
White Clover (foliage)
White Hellebore (also called Green False Hellebore, Indian Poke – all parts)
White Sanicle (also called White Snakeroot, Richweed – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
White Snakeroot (also called White Sanicle, Richweed – leaves, flowers, stems, roots)
White Wax Berry (also called Candleberry Tree, Chicken-Foot Tree, Chinese Tallowtree, Florida Aspen, Popcorn Tree – mildly toxic immature seeds, sap)
Wild Barley (also called Foxtail Barley, Squirreltail Barley – seedheads)
Wild Black Cherry (leaves, pits)
Wild Bleeding Heart (leaves, stems, roots)
Wild Call (all parts)
Wild Radish (seeds)
Wire Vine (also called Angel Vine, Mattress Vine – all parts)
Wisteria (also called Chinese Wisteria, Japanese Wisteria – seeds, pods)
Wolfsbane (also called Aconite, Monkshood – leaves, flowers, roots)
Wood Lily (all parts)
Wood Nettle (leaves, stems)
Woody Aster (entire plant)
Yellow Jasmine (also called Carolina Jessamine, Yellow Jessamine – all parts)
Yellow Oleander (also called Yellow Be-Still Tree – all parts)
Yellow Pine Flax (entire plant, especially seed pods)
Yellow Sage (foliage, flowers, berries)
Yellow Star Thistle (foliage, flowers)
Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow (all parts)
Yews (all Yews: American, English, Western Yew – needles, seeds, bark)
Yucca (all parts)

Marijuana: Because I’ve received numerous emails in the past inquiring if marijuana is toxic to animals, I will make a separate notation of the plant here. All parts of the marijuana plant are toxic to animals. Your pet may suffer from digestive upset, depression, and respiratory depression. If your pet is alert, induce vomiting. Call your veterinarian immediately and observe for symptoms.

Related Articles:

Always Have Your Veterinarian’s as well as the Local Animal Emergency Hospital Number Posted and Handy!!

 

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

We are your best resource for any animal poison-related emergency, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If you think that your pet may have ingested a potentially poisonous substance, call (888) 426-4435. A $60 consultation fee may be applied to your credit card.

Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

 17 Common Poisonous Plants 

May 1, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 37 Comments

Doomed Dogs Get On The Rescue Wagon to Other Shelters

Shelter-animal relocations, known as “transfers,” have been quietly going on for years on a fairly small scale. But the numbers are escalating as growing legions of devoted rescuers organize ever-larger convoys; high-kill shelters initiate partnerships with faraway shelters that have space to accept out-of-luck animals; and large pet-advocacy groups develop strategies to increase the number of pets that are moved and saved every month.

“It’s a growing and increasingly important area in the animal protection field,” says Cory Smith of the Humane Society of the United States, which has developed guidelines to help transporters.

Road to a second chance

PetSmart Charities’ Rescue Waggin’ is the volume leader in moving pets from shelters where there’s no chance they’ll be adopted to shelters where they’re almost certain to get new homes quickly.

Its four transport trucks carry dogs and puppies from shelters mostly in the Midwest and South (92,000 animals are euthanized annually in Louisiana shelters alone, Smith says) to shelters primarily in the North and Northeast, where pet owners have long sterilized their pets and overpopulation has largely been brought under control.

In four years, Rescue Waggin’ has transported more than 25,000 dogs for placement in new homes; officials expect to cover 400,000 miles this year and move 8,000 to 10,000 dogs and puppies. “They’re generally adopted within three days of reaching the receiving shelter,” says Kimberly Noetzel of PetSmart Charities.

In Los Angeles, Pup My Ride has, in less than two years, saved more than 1,000 small dogs that were “red-tagged,” or scheduled to be put down. Animal lovers looked across state lines and took advantage of a supply-and-demand reality.

“There is a big surplus of small dogs in L.A.,” says Elizabeth Oreck of Best Friends Animal Society, which runs the volunteer transport program. “They’re killing them by the thousands. But not very far away, there are communities where shelters have waiting lists for small dogs of every age, color, breed and mix.”

So every 10 to 14 days, 20 to 40 lucky dogs that weigh 30 pounds or less are driven to shelters in Arizona or Utah that have a demand for small dogs. “They are adopted in a matter of days,” Oreck says.

On the opposite coast, Mitchell County Animal Rescue in North Carolina and the Potter League for Animals in Middletown, R.I., formed a partnership in 2004 similar to many that are now cropping up.

The Rhode Island shelter, which often has a waiting list of up to 75 for puppies and small dogs, has received 502 dogs and puppies from the overcrowded shelter nearly 900 miles away. Because of the program, says Potter League’s Christie Smith, the community can “get great puppies here” rather than “fueling puppy mills” by buying them at pet stores.

Still, though transfers are saving some of the estimated 4 million animals euthanized in shelters every year, they’re not without controversy. Some people worry that high-kill communities have less motivation to consider spay/neuter programs if pets are exported and the specter of an 85% kill rate no longer hovers. They also worry that the receiving shelters, in their zeal to help, may lessen adoption chances for pets from their own communities.

Strict parameters necessary

“Transfers aren’t a be-all-end-all,” Smith acknowledges. They’re a reasonable adjunct to other programs such as sterilization, she says, adding that many experts believe such initiatives aren’t undermined by exporting unwanted pets if the “messaging to the community” is done properly. Also, she says, officials at both ends must establish strict parameters.

Transfer proponents say it’s unfair to make animals suffer simply because some areas haven’t fully addressed overpopulation. “If someone is drowning, you don’t just stand there and criticize their inability to swim,” says JoAnne Yohannan of North Shore Animal League America in Port Washington, N.Y., a pet-transfer pioneer that began receiving animals in the 1990s through partnerships with high-kill groups, most of them in the South. “There are animals that are dying, and there are families here who want them.”

North Shore will receive about 7,500 dogs and puppies this year from other states.

By Sharon L. Peters, Special for USA TODAY

rescue-mobileThe North Shore Animal League America van sits at the Indianapolis Animal Care & Control during a Tour For Life (TFL) adoption event.

North Shore, the no-kill shelter in Port Washington, N.Y., helps hundreds of pets get new homes every spring with its one-month TFL.

Two mobile units have visited 23 cities from Redding, Calif., to Parma, Ohio, in the past four weeks during a 25-stop, long-haul tour that wraps up Saturday.

No animals are transported from one state to another. Instead, huge, festive local pet adoption events are organized around the arrival of the hard-to-miss units that “carry the message of adoption,” says North Shore’s Joanne Yohannan.

The TFL program was launched in 2001 with four shelters and 50 adoptions. It has evolved to two vehicles that ply two different routes during March and April, attracting thousands at some stops.

In San Antonio this month, 21 rescue groups converged for TFL day and 70 pets were adopted, most of them with special needs, Yohannan says. In Nashville, six groups found homes for 145 animals, and organizers there so cherish TFL’s annual visits that they presented the unit driver a guitar autographed by country star George Strait.

When the two $200,000 units that allow pets to be showcased in a walk-though environment return to New York, they will have covered more than 11,000 miles and incurred more than $16,000 in expenses (covered by sponsor Purina). About 800 shelter pets will have gone to new homes.

Related Articles:  Where there is a will…

Shelters all over the country, but especially in states with high foreclosures and high unemployment, are bursting at the seams.  So if you have the room in your home and the love in your heart… adopt just one more pet and save a life.

Do I Go Home Today?
by Sandi Thompson

My family brought me home
cradled in their arms.
They cuddled me and smiled at me,
and said I was full of charm.

They played with me and laughed with me.
They showered me with toys.
I sure do love my family,
especially the girls and boys.

The children loved to feed me,
they gave me special treats.
They even let me sleep with them – 
all snuggled in the sheets.

I used to go for walks,
often several times a day.
They even fought to hold the leash, 
I’m very proud to say.

They used to laugh and praise me,
when I played with that old shoe.
But I didn’t know the difference
between the old ones and the new.

The kids and I would grab a rag,
for hours we would tug.
So I thought I did the right thing
when I chewed the bedroom rug.

They said that I was out of control,
and would have to live outside.
This I did not understand,
although I tried and tried.

The walks stopped, one by one;
they said they hadn’t time.
I wish that I could change things,
I wish I knew my crime.

My life became so lonely,
in the backyard on a chain.
I barked and barked all day long,
to keep from going insane.

So they brought me to the shelter,
but were embarrassed to say why.
They said I caused an allergy,
and then kissed me goodbye.

If I’d only had some classes,
as a little pup.
I wouldn’t have been so hard to handle
when I was all grown up.

“You only have one day left,”
I heard the worker say.
Does this mean a second chance?
Do I go home today?

April 24, 2009 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Winter Skin-Saving Tips For Your Pooch

Know how your skin gets dry and itchy in winter? Your dog’s skin struggles with cold weather, overheated houses, and low humidity, too. Here’s how to keep your pooch itch-free:
  • Brush your pup(s) often. Even shorthaired dogs need help sloughing off dead skin cells. Brushing stimulates circulation and kicks up production of natural moisturizers from oil glands.
  • Shampoo less often. Experts warn that weekly baths remove much-needed lubricating oils.
  • Keep your own shampoo — even the gentle one — on the shelf, and use a moisturizing doggie-formulated one.
  • If dry skin persists, take Fluffy to the vet. Itching can be a sign of something more serious. 

Source:  DogAge

November 20, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Harmony and Health – Creating Wellness for Your Pet

Most of us understand the basics of creating wellness. Health begins with a sound diet, exercise, and having fun with our loved ones. Our pets are important family members, like us in many ways, but with their own unique animal needs and abilities. Our pets give us so much – the unconditional love, joy and pleasure they offer us through their loving companionship enhances our lives and makes us healthier people. But it’s easy in the hectic nature of our lives to take our pets for granted and miss opportunities to nurture them for their optimal wellness. Creating wellness requires that we meet the basic needs we all share, and to honor the special needs of our pets. We Are One, but We Are Not the Same   

Pets have special nutritional needs, and are far more limited in their physical ability to deal with a poor diet and the toxins in our environment. With shorter life spans and smaller organ systems, its important to give them the best diet we can that suits their animal physiology and to limit their exposure to toxic chemicals in their food, and in so many household products we use.  Consider choosing non-toxic cleaners and cat litter. Limiting your pet’s exposure to toxic materials is to be considered.

From the holistic perspective, the foundation of good health is a good diet. Dogs and cats need different food from what we eat, and many pets, particularly cats can have trouble digesting the grain-based fare (like that found in most commercial pet foods) that humans can tolerate. When their nutritional needs are met, pets have great vitality and abundant energy, and have better digestion and can maintain their appropriate weight, which are both causes of so many health problems of pets today. 

A good diet provides energy for a healthy activity level, meaning daily exercise. It’s easy to neglect the exercise and play needs of our pets, but the consequences can be severe. Beyond the impact on their health, too little physical activity can create a host of inappropriate behaviors and creates a great deal of stress for our pets. Dogs need daily cardiovascular exercise in the form of a walk or run. 

Emotional Stress and Illness

Beyond a good diet, exercise, and reducing exposure to toxins, the single best thing we can do for our pets (and ourselves) is to minimize the stress they experience. The mind-body connection has been well researched in human health, and emotional stress has a well-documented impact on our well-being. This is no less true for our pets, though the idea is not generally taken into account from the traditional veterinary perspective. Taking steps to reduce your pet’s stress can go a long way to creating wellness.

Some pets seem to be more naturally “high-strung,” which may be a breed specific quality or may result from their life history – a common story with rescued companions. Stress comes in many forms, including major life changes, stressful situations, and daily stress in our home and relationships.

Major life events like the addition of new pets or human family members, death of loved ones, house renovations, or moving can trigger stress in many pets, and the impact can be felt for many months after the change occurs. Cats can be particularly sensitive to these changes – even getting new carpet can cause a strong stress response in cats. Dogs are often particularly sensitive to events that cause shifts in relationships. It’s important to provide the “security blankets” our pets need during these times. Make sure the cat’s favorite pillow or blanket isn’t packed in a box when you move, and be sure each pet has their favorite toys available. When introducing new family members, spend extra time with your dog to confirm their continued high status with you and to insure that they don’t feel neglected.

The Ultimate Wellness Builder – Reducing Daily Stress for Your Pet

While stressful major life changes and trips to the vet (we hope!) are few and far between, one of the most profound sources of stress for your pet is perhaps the easiest to overlook – the stress that our pets absorb from us on a daily basis. One of the greatest gifts our pets give us is the comfort they provide to us every day. People with pets are generally healthier and live longer, because our pets not only provide companionship, but they literally absorb our stress.

Our pets are quite emotionally sensitive and are highly attuned to our moods. Animal communicators tell us that part of our companions’ “spiritual mission” is to help us cope with our emotions. It’s important to recognize that our own stress level is very obvious to our pets and can impact their wellness greatly. Many pet owners report that their pets share their emotional stress, and often share the same physical symptoms that stress creates for their own health. With that in mind, making a commitment to reducing your daily stress level is one of the best things you can do for your pet’s health.

Wellness is the result of many factors, and especially for our pets, nearly every one of those factors is under our control. Making sound decisions for our pets with regard to diet, exercise, and activities creates the foundation for vibrant health. Adding the essential element of reducing stress can help you give your pet a more joyous, healthier and longer life. With everything our pets do for us and our well-being, we owe it to them to return the favor and create harmony for them in every way we can. The time we have with our animal companions is precious in so many ways, and we have it in our power to honor that special bond through our commitment to harmonious living.

Courtesy Only Natural Pet LLC. 2008 by Cynthia Holley-Connolly

 

 

 

November 19, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Orange County Sheriff’s Department asks pet owners to ‘buckle up’ their pets

The Orange County Sheriff’s Department is joining forces with other agencies in an effort to remind pet owners to buckle up their pets.

On Wednesday, the department and pet safety advocate Bark Buckle Up will team up with the California Highway Patrol, Orange County Fire Authority, Anaheim Police Department and OC Animal Care to host a press conference regarding the growing safety concerns of having unrestrained pets in the car while driving. Bark Buckle UP pet safety program is traveling nationally to teach and promote pet safety while traveling with pets.

The need is evident. According to the California Office of Traffic Safety, 98 percent of dogs travel unrestrained in vehicles with their owners. Losing a family pet in an accident is devastating, but the risks to vehicle riders and first responders called to help in the event of an accident can be significant.

“Any time lost in the caring of accident victims because of the need to deal with a frightened or injured animal can and should be avoided,” said Sheriff’s spokesman Jim Amormino.

The Sheriff’s Department is taking a lead role by urging pet owners to safely secure their animals at all times. Bark Buckle Up will use live dogs of all sizes to demonstrate how to secure pets with available safety products, capable of safeguarding animals, owners and first responders. The 10 a.m. Nov. 12 event is at the OCSD Training Facility, 1900 W. Katella Ave. in Orange.

For more information about the press conference, contact OCSD Media Relations at 714-647-7042. Information about ways to secure pets and more is available at www.barkbuckleup.com.

November 12, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Top 10 People Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pets

no-no-doggie-foodsChocolate, Macadamia nuts, avocados…these foods may sound delicious to you, but are actually quite dangerous to our animal companions. Our ASPCA nutrition experts have come up with a list of top 10 people foods that you should not feed your pet. If ingestion of any of these items should occur, please note the amount ingested and contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435 immediately.      

 

1. Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine
These products all contain substances called methylxanthines, which are found in cacao seeds, the fruit of the plant used to make coffee and in the nuts of an extract used in some sodas. When ingested by pets, methylxanthines can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Note that darker chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate. White chocolate has the lowest level of methylxanthines, while baking chocolate contains the highest.

2. Alcohol
Alcoholic beverages and food products containing alcohol can cause vomiting, diarrhea, decreased coordination, central nervous system depression, difficulty breathing, tremors, abnormal blood acidity, coma and even death.

3. Avocado
The leaves, fruit, seeds and bark of avocados contain Persin, which can cause vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. Birds and rodents are especially sensitive to avocado poisoning, and can develop congestion, difficulty breathing and fluid accumulation around the heart. Some ingestions may even be fatal.

4. Macadamia Nuts
Macadamia nuts are commonly used in many cookies and candies. However, they can cause problems for your canine companion. These nuts have caused weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and hyperthermia in dogs. Signs usually appear within 12 hours of ingestion and last approximately 12 to 48 hours.

5. Grapes & Raisins
Although the toxic substance within grapes and raisins is unknown, these fruits can cause kidney failure. In pets who already have certain health problems, signs may be more dramatic.

6. Yeast Dough
Yeast dough can rise and cause gas to accumulate in your pet’s digestive system. This can be painful and can cause the stomach or intestines to rupture. Because the risk diminishes after the dough is cooked and the yeast has fully risen, pets can have small bits of bread as treats. However, these treats should not constitute more than 5 percent to 10 percent of your pet’s daily caloric intake.

7. Raw/Undercooked Meat, Eggs and Bones
Raw meat and raw eggs can contain bacteria such as Salmonella [ital] and E. coli [ital] that can be harmful to pets. In addition, raw eggs contain an enzyme called avidin that decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin), which can lead to skin and coat problems. Feeding your pet raw bones may seem like a natural and healthy option that might occur if your pet lived in the wild. However, this can be very dangerous for a domestic pet, who might choke on bones, or sustain a grave injury should the bone splinter and become lodged in or puncture your pet’s digestive tract. 

8. Xylitol
Xylitol is used as a sweetener in many products, including gum, candy, baked goods and toothpaste. It can cause insulin release in most species, which can lead to liver failure. The increase in insulin leads to hypoglycemia (lowered sugar levels). Initial signs of toxicosis include vomiting, lethargy and loss of coordination. Signs can progress to recumbancy and seizures. Elevated liver enzymes and liver failure can be seen within a few days.

9. Onions, Garlic, Chives
These vegetables and herbs can cause gastrointestinal irritation and could lead to red blood cell damage. Although cats are more susceptible, dogs are also at risk if a large enough amount is consumed. Toxicity is normally diagnosed through history, clinical signs and microscopic confirmation of Heinz bodies. An occasional low dose, such as what might be found in pet foods or treats, likely will not cause a problem, but we recommend that you do NOT give your pets large quantities of these foods.  (The garlic argument is on-going.  Adding garlic powder to their food is a natural flea deterent among other things.  But no garlic cloves, chunks or even bits.)

10. Milk
Because pets do not possess significant amounts of lactase (the enzyme that breaks down lactose in milk), milk and other milk-based products cause them diarrhea or other digestive upset.

 

“Must” Resources For Every Pet Parent: 

Every Dog’s Legal Guide 

November 8, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Forbidden Fruit: Popular Avocado Can Poison Your Pet

 

avocadoA slice of avocado may be the perfect addition to your sandwich, but it can have serious consequences for our feathered and furry friends. According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center in Urbana, IL, pet poisonings fromavocado and avocado-based foods like guacamole are a consistent risk. In 2008, the Center managed 115 cases involving ingestions of avocado, and though an overwhelming 83 percent of those incidents involved dogs, the most devastating effects were seen in birds, rabbits and certain large animals like horses and cattle.

A native of Central and South America, avocado (Persea americana) is a subtropical tree that produces a pear-shaped fruit prized for its high fat content, vitamin-rich “meat” and smooth texture. Unfortunately, the fruit also contains a toxin called persin that’s harmful to animals, especially in large quantities.

“Avocado leaves, fruit, seeds and bark all contain the toxic principle known as persin,” says Dana Farbman, CVT, Senior Manager of Professional Communications at APCC. Guatemalan varieties—sold in grocery stores nationwide—are most often involved in pet exposures, Farbman adds, while other strains have varying degrees of toxic potential. Birds—who accounted for 5 percent of avocado cases in 2008—appear to be particularly sensitive to the fatty fruit; consumption can result in respiratory distress, congestion, fluid accumulation around the heart and even death. In curious canines, clinical signs of ingestion can include gastrointestinal distress, vomiting and diarrhea. Typically, these effects are seen in dogs who’ve nibbled on significant amounts of a tree’s fruit or branches.

Pet parents should prevent their animal companions from coming into contact with avocado by placing the fruit—or that festive bowl of guacamole—out of reach. For those lucky Californians who have an avocado tree in their backyards, keep a close eye on your pet when he’s outside, and don’t mistake the toxic fruit for Fido’s gnarly tennis ball.

As always, if you suspect your pet has eaten something toxic, please call your vet or the ASPCA’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435. For more information about people food that’s toxic for pets, please visit APCC online.

November 7, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pets Left Home Alone – With Anxiety

If Bowser becomes a weapon of mass destruction when home alone, the cause could simply be boredom, anxiety, or fear. To counter the boredom factor, be sure he has plenty of toys to chew, pull, and toss. Help him relax by leaving the radio or TV on at low volume while you’re out. Soothing music and the sound of voices comforts a lonely pooch and may be enough to ease his anxiety. Finally, come and go calmly. If you don’t make a big fuss of your departure and return, he might not, either… DogAge Tip

Leaving your pup in a crate (or cage) for regularly or for extended periods of time is also not the answer.  There is a growing movement against cage or crate training for the purpose of housing your dog regularly or for extended periods of time. Initial crate training to get pups used to a crate or carrier for travel or visitation situations, for their safety, or to give them a comfortable place to retreat to, on their own, but with the door unlocked, should be the goal; not for regular housing.  Recent studies and common sense have shown that regular and extensive cage confinement can cause aggression, nervousness, and increase barking when your pet is finally out of their cage and can cause or exasserbate bladder and kidney problems in future years.

 If you have left your dog caged regularly or for extended periods of time, it will probably take them awhile to calm down and adjust to being out and home alone.  So there may be some incidents of chewing or extended barking; TV or music may help that.

If your dog is very destructive, professional training is suggested.  Other options are confining them to a kitchen or service porch area, with their cage accessable but left open, but where they can walk around and access their food, water and a piddle pad or doggie door if needed.  Soothing music, a small TV on the counter and toys, as well as hiring a dog walker, always help!

Be a responsible and sensitive pet parent.  Crate training and regular confinement has been promoted by pet store owners and crate manufacturers to entice people to purchase pets while requiring minimal effort or adustment and sacrifice on their part, upping pet sales as well as the sale of crates and other related products.  It is not in the best interest of the pet.  It is in the best interest of the owner.

Animals, like children, add love and companionship to our lives, but require a certain amount of adjustment and sacrifice.  Clean and perfect homes and houses become a thing of the past; a small price for best friend.  All relationships require compromise and adjustment if they are to be successful and mutually fulfilling… with pets as well as with humans.

November 7, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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