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Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

The Mistake That Can Wreak Havoc on Your Dog’s Skeleton

Story at-a-glance

  • Osteochondrosis is one of a variety of developmental orthopedic diseases that occur in young, fast-growing dogs, typically large and giant breeds. The most common form of osteochondrosis in dogs is osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), which can cause angular limb deformities in long bones, and cartilage damage in shoulders, elbows, knees and hocks.
  • Inappropriate nutrition has been identified as an important factor in the development of bone disease in big puppies. Free-feeding, overfeeding, and improper feeding of energy-dense diets, excessive calcium and mineral intake, and an imbalance of vitamin D metabolites present significant risks to growing large and giant breed puppies.
  • The diets of big puppies should be carefully managed to help prevent developmental orthopedic disease. The problem in today’s young, growing dogs is not one of dietary deficiency, but rather one of “over-nutrition” caused by overfeeding and inappropriate supplementation of certain nutrients.
  • To avoid “overgrowing” a large or giant breed puppy, the first step is to feed portion-controlled meals rather than free-feeding. Puppies should be maintained in optimal body condition, not maximal body condition.
  • The best diet for a large breed puppy is designed to meet the nutrient requirements for growth in large breeds, contains the proper amount of calories to avoid rapid growth, and also the appropriate levels of calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D, and the correct calcium-to-phosphorus ratio.

Large Dog Breed

By Dr. Becker

Osteochondrosis is one of several developmental orthopedic diseases that occur in young, fast-growing dogs, especially large and giant breeds like the Doberman Pinscher, the Labrador Retriever, Great Danes and Newfoundlands.

The most common form of osteochondrosis in dogs is called osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), which is a defect in bone development at the extremity of a bone. The problem is thought to be a disruption in the manufacture of bone tissue that results in injury to growth cartilage. These injuries can cause angular limb deformities in long bones, as well as damage to the cartilage in the shoulder, stifle (knee joint), hock (the joint in the rear leg below the knee), and the elbow.

Inflammatory joint disease often follows osteochondrosis, ultimately leading to degenerative joint disease.

Developmental orthopedic diseases occur during the early stages of bone growth, before the growth plates close. This crucial period (the first year of life) is when a puppy’s skeletal system is most vulnerable to physical, nutritional and metabolic damage due to increased metabolic activity. The reason large and giant breeds are at higher risk is because genetics cause their bodies to grow very rapidly. Another predisposing factor is whether a puppy’s parents developed osteochondrosis.

Nutrition Can Be a Significant Risk Factor for Bone Disease

Studies of nutritional risk factors involved in osteochondrosis have identified free-feeding and overfeeding – especially of high-energy foods designed for rapid growth – as contributors. Energy-dense diets can promote increased levels of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor, insulin and thyroid hormones. Other dietary influences include excessive calcium intake, excessive mineral intake, and an imbalance of vitamin D metabolites.

For optimal bone development in puppies, diets must include appropriate and balanced amounts of nutrients. Excessive calcium and energy (calories), plus rapid growth predispose dogs to developing osteochondrosis. When a growing dog — especially a large or giant breed — is overfed and overweight, the bones are stressed by both static and dynamic forces that can cause damage to the skeleton.

In one study, Great Dane puppies that were free-fed a diet high in energy and minerals, or a diet high in calcium, developed osteochondrosis with clearly visible symptoms.

Studies have also shown that large breed puppies fed diets with high calcium content or high calcium and phosphorus content also acquired developmental orthopedic disease.

This is because puppies aren’t able to control or limit absorption of dietary calcium and certain other minerals. Absorption occurs through the intestines, and the higher the calcium and mineral content of the diet, the greater the level of absorption and assimilation into developing bone structure. This can disturb the natural process of bone growth and result in lesions in the skeleton and joints.

Even when highly palatable, energy-dense diets are well-balanced, when free-fed to large and giant breed puppies, the risk of OCD and other orthopedic diseases is increased. This is one of many reasons I don’t recommend free-feeding any pet. Most dogs and cats will overeat if free-fed, and as you can see, this is especially hazardous to the health of growing large and giant breed puppies.

To date, no studies have found protein intake to be a factor in the development of osteochondrosis.

Large Breed Puppy Diets Should Be Carefully Managed

Careful management of the diets of large and giant breed dogs won’t eliminate every instance of developmental bone disease, but it’s a crucial step in decreasing risk factors. The problem in today’s young, growing dogs is not one of dietary deficiency, but rather one of “overnutrition” caused by overfeeding and over-supplementation.

Young large breed dogs are at higher risk of developing skeletal problems than small breed dogs, even when both are fed diets with too little or too much calcium. Even when calcium intake is optimal, big dogs have more growth-related skeletal issues than smaller breeds.

To help prevent disease, we must make every effort to control the rate at which big dogs grow by feeding only the amount of calories needed to keep their bodies lean while they develop. The first step is to feed portion-controlled meals rather than free-feeding. We want to help dogs maintain optimal body condition, not maximal body condition.

Diets should not be extremely high in calories. Many super premium dog foods on the market are highly energy-dense. By contrast, large-breed puppy foods have reduced caloric density, calcium and phosphorus levels compared with other canine growth diets.

Switching a big puppy to an adult diet to try to control growth rate is not recommended. Adult diets don’t have the calories per serving that big puppies require, so they can end up eating more food and taking in excessive levels of other nutrients, which can be risky.

The Right Way to Feed a Large or Giant Breed Puppy

The ideal diet for a large breed puppy is designed to meet the nutrient requirements for growth in large breeds, contains the proper amount of calories to avoid rapid growth, and also the appropriate levels of calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D, and the correct calcium-to-phosphorus ratio. Large and giant breed puppies continue to grow until about 18 months of age, so they should be kept on a specially designed growth diet until they are fully grown.

The goal in feeding a large or giant breed puppy is to keep him lean, with controlled growth. A healthy, large or giant breed puppy will thrive on a portion-controlled, balanced, species-appropriate diet. You can feed an ideally balanced homemade diet or an excellent quality commercially available food.

What about those large breed puppy foods? Traditional puppy foods often provide much higher calorie content than large breed puppies require, causing them to gain too much weight too quickly. This is why pet food manufacturers began producing formulas specifically for large breed puppies.

These are typically diets lower in calorie density (the number of calories per cup or gram of food) than a regular puppy diet. They’re also usually lower in calcium on an energy basis.

These are two very important factors for reducing too-rapid growth in big puppies. Some adult foods may also be low calorically, but often they have high calcium content on an energy basis, which is not what you want for a growing large or giant breed pup.

If you’re going to feed kibble to a large breed puppy, I recommend you look for special large breed puppy formulas or a formula (preferably a balanced, raw food diet) that is "Approved for all life stages." This means the food is appropriate for growing puppies or adult dogs.

I do not recommend feeding a traditional (high growth) puppy food to large breed puppies.

June 3, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

National Puppy Day is Tomorrow (Saturday 03.23.13) #Adopt Just One More!!

Things You Should Know Before Bringing Home Puppy
by Colleen Paige – National Puppy Day Founder

Oooops... National Puppy Day

National Puppy Day is a day to celebrate the magic and unconditional love that puppies bring to our lives. It’s also a day to help save orphaned puppies across the globe and educate the public about the horrors of puppy mills, as well as further the mission for a nation of puppy-free pet stores. While National Puppy Day supports responsible breeders, it does encourage prospective families to consider adoption as a first choice.

Choosing the Right Breed
When considering bringing a puppy into your home, make sure that you’ve researched the breed you’re adopting, taking into consideration their temperament, activity level, breed characteristics and other needs in relation to your home environment and family lifestyle. When adopting, make sure to ask if you can be alone in a more isolated area to interact with the puppy and observe his or her behavior. Also ask the shelter staff about the personality of the puppy you’re interested in, as they will have spent more time around the puppy to better gauge that.

Not Just a Dog
Never adopt a puppy as a gift for a child, as this turns the puppy into a novelty but rather explain to your children about the overpopulation of pets in shelters and let them know that the puppy is a new family member and needs to be treated with love, respect and patience, just like a new baby would need.

Child/Puppy Safety
If you have small children, really young, hyper puppies are not a good match because they can scratch and chew on sensitive fingers and hands. Never adopt a puppy that is less than at least 8-10 weeks old, preferably 12 weeks or older, as they have had more time to learn social cues from their littermates and mother, which helps a puppy behave better in the long term. Teach young children to never pull on a puppy’s ears or tail, as both are sensitive and could injure and scare the puppy, creating a bonding problem between child and puppy.

Finances
Keep in mind that your puppy won’t be a puppy forever. Visualize how much your puppy will grow and how much they’ll eat. Make sure you know ahead of time that you can afford to feed your puppy once full grown. Veterinary trips are always inevitable at some point and time, so keeping an emergency fund for your dog is a smart idea, so you don’t get caught with major vet bills you can’t afford to pay.

Grooming
If you have an aversion to pet hair floating around your home and brushing your puppy every day seems like an abominable task, you may want to consider adopting a breed that has little to no shedding.

Exercise
Puppies need exercise every day, preferably shorter walks more often, as young puppies tire easily, especially in heat. Make sure to read about the breed or breeds of a mixed breed puppy to better understand what your puppy needs in terms of physical activity.

Nutrition
Give your puppy a great start in life! Make sure you buy an all natural, preferably organic food that is void of corn, wheat, sugar, by products, chemicals and dyes.

Teething
When your puppy is teething, he will try to gnaw on anything he can find to relieve his discomfort. The best way to quell this is to take an old washcloth, cut it into strips and tie a few small knots it in it, sticking the strips in a Ziploc bag and putting in the freezer. Once frozen, hold a frozen strip and allow your puppy to chew on it, which will soothe and numb sensitive gums. Always hold it and never allow your puppy to chew on it unattended.

See more cute puppy photos like these and others at Just One More Pet: Why God Gave Us Puppies

Ooops… Are We In Trouble??? Winking smile

March 23, 2013 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pets, Stop Euthenization | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Why God Gave Us Puppies

If you need your heart warmed or just a quick smile, take a look…

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Pups Day 17 - New Basket 023

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(Choose to have a happy day.)
(A man may smile and bid you hail
Yet wish you to the devil;
But when a good dog wags his tail,
You know he’s on the level.)

h/t to George King

National Puppy Day is Saturday 03.23.13 – #Adopt Just One More!!

March 19, 2013 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend | , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Puppy Bowl IV – 2013

Animal Planet’s Puppy Bowl includes puppies, kittens, hamsters, hedgehogs – an absolute must see. If you missed this year’s Puppy Bowl, make sure you tune in next year. It’s worth the time. Even better, all of the puppies featured in the game are adoptable via Pet Finder. An entertaining event supporting a worthwhile cause. Check out the videos; definitely good for a solid giggle or two.

For those who are not football fans, the Puppy Bowl is a great alternative or an additional fun watch on Super Bowl Sunday:

Video:  Puppy Bowl IX – 2013 Starting Line-up

Video:  ABC NEWS Doggie Football Event

Video:  2013 Puppy Bowl Video Final

February 5, 2013 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Adoption, Pet Events, pet fun, Pets | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Dedicated or Confused

Confused or Dedicated

Dedicated or Confused?

August 1, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, animals, Animals Adopting Animals, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , | 1 Comment

Heartbreaking Story (and pictures): Can You Help an Abused and Neglected Great Dane at PAWS of Austin?

UPDATE (December 21) — Received another update from Prima this morning on Noel’s condition, which is improving (though she still has a long road ahead). More importantly was this note she added about the donations that poured in yesterday:

I would like to thank those of you who donated to help Noel. Thanks to you we can provide Noel with everything she needs, including the expensive medication, special shampoo, food, bedding and any additional vet care she needs. Her recovery will be much faster thanks to all your help.

Thank you all so much for your kindness and generosity; may you be blessed a thousand times over for helping save this poor creature.

_______________________

We adopted our (now) 11-month old Great Dane puppy, Bevo, when he was a just a skin-and-bones 4-month old/40 lb puppy from PAWS of Austin, which is our local Great Dane rescue.

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How anybody can abuse and neglect these creatures is beyond my understanding.

The founder of PAWS, Prima Mosi, is one of the kindest and most compassionate people we have ever known. Her dedication to rescuing, healing, and finding homes for these gentle giants is astounding.

PAWS has recently taken in two very, very special needs Harlequin danes. The holidays are a time of giving and being thankful for all we have, to include our canine companions. PAWS could really use your donations now to help with the vet expenses of these two very special, abused, and neglected danes.

The first dog is Noel, who was rescued from a shelter in Garland, TX. As you can see from the pictures, she is in pretty bad shape. She is very young, but it looks like she’s been to hell and back. Her skin is raw and oozing blood. She also has bite wounds on her face and neck. She will need some major vet care to get better.

In the 7+ years I’ve written this blog, I’ve never once held a Bleg or asked for donations to help keep this site going. And I’m not going to do that now, either. But please read the rest of this post (which is difficult), and if you can spare a few dollars to donate to PAWS of Austin, I couldn’t thank you enough.

Here’s Prima’s report on her first 4 days trying to save this puppy:

Day1:

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If this doesn’t break your heart, you probably don’t have one.

Noel did well last night. She got up at about midnight went out and finally peed and pooped. Then she went back to bed. In the morning she was a little more awake then she was yesterday. That is because she had a good night sleep on a soft bed in a warm house, probably for the first time in her life.

Early this morning we went out and she peed again. She got her meds and ate breakfast. She is now back in her bed. The bedding has to be changed often because she is oozing blood. So far I used 3 dog beds, 2 comforters and 11 towels. I will be going to Goodwill later this afternoon to buy more comforters. We’ll also need to get more dog beds, because the beds are soaked with blood and they will need to be tossed out. The smell is pretty bad too.

Our vet has called the Central Texas Specialty Hospital to make an appointment with the dermatologist. Because this dog is so raw, it may be difficult to do extensive skin testing, but I’m sure the vets will do whatever she can to make sure we address everything that she has and whatever she needs. We also have to wait on the HW test until the vet can get to her vain.

Noel is so exhausted, she is sleeping most of the day, except for when she is up to eat. She has ok appetite. She loves the bologna sandwiches.

Day 2:

Gave Noel another medicated bath. I tried to get as many scabs off as I could. It was disgusting. The water in the tub was so bloody and I was standing in the middle of it. I don’t get sick to my stomach very often, but that was one of those times. Glad I didn’t have anything to eat that morning. Noel just stood there and let me wash her. She is such a good girl. Getting her out of the tub was a challenge. This is one of those times when I wished I had some help here, but it was just the two of us. Had to be very careful when I wiped her down. I could now see the severity of the wounds on her skin. They were very deep.

I decided to take Noel back to the vet to be checked again because now the vet could see the wounds better. Also, needed to do some tests. Because Noel had hard time walking, we decided to leave her in the van and check her in there. The vet tech and Dr. Mockler came to the car. The vet tech had hard time getting a vain, but Dr. Mockler managed to draw blood. We tested for Lyme, Ehrlicia, Anaplasma and Heartworms. The good news, all are negative. Yay!!

We’re still dealing with lots and lots of Mange mites and a bad Staph infection. She also has an eye infection. In addition, the vet noticed scratches and wounds that may have been cause by possibly a car accident. It kind of looks like she’s been dragged on the road. Dr. Mockler suggested that we leave the wounds open, so they could drain, but she may have to suture them later.

The vet gave us some Previcox to help with the pain and inflammation. The vet receptionist went and got us some more comforters.

Overall Noel is doing well. She is laying on the dog bed, covered with a clean comforter, enjoying her high protein meal and bologna sandwiches.

Day 3:

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A few dollars will go a long way to helping Noel make a full recovery.

Noel is definitely doing better today. She is much more awake. I also noticed that her legs are less swollen, although they still look pretty bad. Later in the day I went to check on her and she was not on her bed. Took me a second to see her. She was laying on the couch. Yes, she is a true Dane.

Later in the evening we sat in the TV room and Noel decided to join us. She definitely wants to stay close. She comes close to get petted. Unfortunately we can only pet her on the head because that is the only place that is not bleeding. She really enjoys getting petted.

Day 4:

This morning the picture was not very pretty. She is oozing blood from everywhere, neck, legs, hips and underarms. It is everywhere. Looks like I murdered someone in my living room. The smell is better though. Not as stinky. She will get another bath later today to wash the blood off. Of course, as soon as she stands up, she bleeds again. We are constantly changing the bedding because it is soaked with blood. Good thing we just bought a new washing machine.

She is now back on the couch, sleeping. I’m waiting for the sun to come out, so we can go out to enjoy the warm sun outside. It is good for her. Then, it’s bath time.

I am so glad we rescued this girl. Can’t wait until she looks better. She will be gorgeous and I love her personality. I just feel so bad for her because she looks so miserable right now. But not to worry, I can already see a difference.

The other dane is Dolly, who was found on the streets near a Dollar General store in Brownsville, TX. She was extremely emaciated, only 63 lbs when found and has numerous health issues, including heart worms.

_______________

When I read this email from Prima this morning at my desk, my heart was broken. Thinking about our Great Danes and their amazing capacity for love and loyalty, and how sensitive they can be…makes trying to comprehend how horrible this dog’s life has been too much to bear. We’ve already sent a large donation to PAWS and are taking over two extra (and extra large) dog beds that we are no longer using this evening.

Please consider making a year-end tax-deductible donation to PAWS of Austin if you can.

Source: Urban Grounds

December 23, 2011 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Man's Best Friend, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Deformed Pit-Bull Puppy Nursed Back to Health

Erica Daniel, a Florida woman who fosters dogs that need extra care, saved a pit-bull puppy from the trashand nursed it back to health from a debilitating, life-threatening medical condition.

11-week-old Harper was born with a condition called pectus excavatum, more commonly know as "swimmer puppy disorder," according to NBC’s "Today." Puppies afflicted with the disorder lie flat on their chests with their arms splayed out, resembling a swimmer in mid-stroke. Most puppies with pectus excavatum don’t survive, and Harper herself came very close to being put down before Daniel stepped in.

Daniel had not originally intended to keep Harper alive, but simply to give the puppy one day of love and affection before she had to be euthanized. "I had to show her what it was like to be loved," Daniel said. But as she spent the day with Harper and massaged the puppy’s limbs, the deformed dog began to respond and quickly show signs of improvement.

Instead of putting Harper down, Daniel had a vet perform a closer inspection, only to find that the pup was indeed far healthier than first thought. No longer doomed, Harper has received massage therapy and hydrotherapy. Now, only 11 weeks later, she’s walking on her own four feet.

"She’s a walking miracle," says Bev McCartt, Harper’s physical therapist. "She’s a real testament to a dog’s determination to get up and just go."

Image: Harper the puppy walking in grass

November 17, 2011 Posted by | Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , | Leave a comment

Rescuing 15 Puppies from HELL

Every dog needs a family that provides him with a loving pack structure. They need love, they need exercise and good food to thrive.

Sadly, in this shelter in Turkey dogs get GARBAGE for food and RAT JUICE instead of water. Don’t believe it? Click here for a hi-def picture in all it’s grotesque glory.

15 of them… each one more loving and playful than the other, living in absolute squalor and deprivation in a municipal shelter that can only be described as Hell on Earth.

Being there, hearing the cheerful yelps of the playful puppies mixed with the muted last breaths of the babies that are too weak to survive was a most harrowing experience. One that I’m sure very few people would be able to go through without breaking down in tears.



We have started the process of getting ALL the puppies out. And for this we need you.

We need to find loving homes for these babies, and it’s urgent. In this case, and due to the fact that it would take at least four months for us to organize the paperwork needed to send them to Europe we are going toprioritize adoptions in the USA and Canada.

But first, we need to get the babies out. Have them checked by the vet, etc… etc… then, once we have approved families for them we will organize the logistics of sending them all to their final homes.

Due to the sheer number of puppies this rescue is going to be a logistical challenge, involving tens of people, from the rescuers, to a number of clinics scattered all over town. Add to this that we don’t have enough foster homes in Istanbul and you get the idea.

You can help us in three ways:

1. SHARE this blogpost and seek assistance in your immediate network. Click on LIKE and SHARE…
2. ADOPT/FOSTER: If you are in the USA, Canada or Turkey please offer to become a long term foster or even better to open your home to one of this babies as a final adoptant.
3. SPONSOR: Please, please… Chipin here… that is going to be the only way we will be able to pull this one off.

These babies were born in the gates of hell. Show them that life can be a very different experience, that humans can also be beautiful and kind.

Contact me and apply for adoption: viktor@myletsadopt.com

Here are some more pics of the babies we need to rescue, and it will give you an idea of the brutality they are being forced to endure in that hell hole.

Source: LetsAdoptBlog Posted 9.19.11  -  Cross-posted at JustOneMorePet

September 20, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , | Leave a comment

Meet Jasmine… A True Story…

A True Story.

In 2003, police in Warwickshire , England , opened a garden shed and found a whimpering, cowering dog.  The dog had been locked in the shed and abandoned.  It was dirty and malnourished, and had quite clearly been abused.

In an act of kindness, the police took the dog, which was a female greyhound, to the Nuneaton Warwickshire Wildlife Sanctuary, which is run by a man named Geoff Grewcock, and known as a haven for animals abandoned, orphaned, or otherwise in need.

Geoff and the other sanctuary staff went to work with two aims: to restore the dog to full health, and to win her trust.  It took several weeks, but eventually both goals were achieved. They named her Jasmine, and they started to think about finding her an adoptive home.

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Jasmine, however, had other ideas.  No one quite remembers how it came about, but Jasmine started welcoming all animal arrivals at the sanctuary.  It would not matter if it were a puppy, a fox cub, a rabbit or, any other lost or hurting animal.  Jasmine would just peer into the box or cage and, when and where possible, deliver a welcoming lick.

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Geoff relates one of the early incidents.  "We had two puppies that had been abandoned by a nearby railway line.  One was a Lakeland Terrier cross and another was a Jack Russell Doberman cross.  They were tiny when they arrived at the centre, and Jasmine approached them and grabbed one by the scruff of the neck in her mouth and put him on the settee.  Then she fetched the other one and sat down with them, cuddling them."

"But she is like that with all of our animals, even the rabbits.  She takes all the stress out of them, and it helps them to not only feel close to her, but to settle into their new surroundings.  She has done the same with the fox and badger cubs, she licks the rabbits and guinea pigs, and even lets the birds perch on the bridge of her nose."

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Jasmine, the timid, abused, deserted waif, became the animal sanctuary’s resident surrogate mother, a role for which she might have been born.  The list of orphaned and abandoned youngsters she has cared for comprises five fox cubs, four badger cubs, fifteen chicks, eight guinea pigs, two stray puppies and fifteen rabbits – and one roe deer fawn.  Tiny Bramble, eleven weeks old, was found semi-conscious in a field.  Upon arrival at the sanctuary, Jasmine cuddled up to her to keep her warm, and then went into the full foster-mum role.  Jasmine the greyhound showers Bramble the roe deer with affection, and makes sure nothing is matted.

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"They are inseparable," says Geoff.  "Bramble walks between her legs, and they keep kissing each other.  They walk together round the sanctuary.  It’s a real treat to see them."

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Jasmine will continue to care for Bramble until she is old enough to be returned to woodland life.  When that happens, Jasmine will not be lonely.  She will be too busy showering love and affection on the next orphan or victim of abuse.

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Pictured from the left are: "Toby", a stray Lakeland dog; "Bramble", orphaned roe deer; "Buster", a stray Jack Russell; a dumped rabbit; "Sky", an injured barn owl; and "Jasmine", with a mother’s heart doing best what a caring mother would do..and such is the order of God’s Creation.

And, just in case you wondered, Snopes.com (not that Snopes is always accurate or truthful… but is usually good with this type of story) has verified the truth of this wonderful story and the reality of these photographs which accompany the story – so share this story, and help make someone else’s day to be just a little brighter!

July 17, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Animals Adopting Animals, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pictures to Make You Smile

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March 28, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, animals, Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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