JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Sarah Palin Book Signing – "Touched By An Angel"

Sent to me by a dear friend… Freckles: 

Barracuda Brigade -  By Elizabeth Hawkes – Originally Posted 11/19/13

THE VILLAGES, FL – My husband, Gregory and I attended former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin’s book signing, where she showcased her newest book, “Good Tidings and Great Joy: Protecting the Heart of Christmas (Kindle),” on Monday, November 18th at Barnes & Noble Booksellers on Old Camp Road.

Gov. Palin is no stranger to The Villages. On September 21, 2008 at Lake Sumter Landing Market Square, Gov. Palin held her first public rally as John McCain’s newly appointed running mate and attracted thousands from around the state and nation.

On this special day, the book store had opened hours earlier from their normal hours of operation correctly anticipating a large crowd to meet Sarah Palin. 
Gov. Palin  is not only the former governor of Alaska but the first woman Republican vice-presidential candidate in American history.

She has written best sellers Going Rogue: An American Life (Kindle) and America by Heart : Reflections on Family, Faith, and Flag (Kindle). She is in Time Magazine’s 2010 “100 Most Influential People,” the star of Sarah Palin’s Alaska television series, and a Fox News contributor.

As soon as we arrived at 7:30 a.m., after a harried parking job and mad anticipatory dash to the entrance of the book store, we each purchased a copy of Gov. Palin’s new book and obtained color-coded wristbands.

Barnes & Noble began distributing wristbands, thirty minutes before our arrival. and by early afternoon, 750 were given out. Both the wristbands and a Barnes & Noble receipt were a requirement to get in line for the book signing.

To my heartbroken dismay, our puppy, Freckles, was not welcomed in the store. She had accompanied us on the long three-hour drive to the book signing from our home in Port Saint Lucie, FL.

We were informed, by a very nice store manager, that it would be necessary for us to take turns standing in line and watching over her.

Freckles was understandably disappointed that she would not be able to meet Sarah Palin as she had done at a former book signing with Gov. Palin’s father and brother.

So, we decided that I would stand in line first while Gregory sat outside at a table with Freckles. The weather was lovely and the book signing patrons friendly offering Freckles a hand shake and a gentle fur stroking. My husband informed me by cell phone, that despite all the favorable attention and kisses, Freckles continued to whimper and cry for her mommy.

Gregory P. Hawkes with Freckles

A year earlier, at the same Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Freckles proudly strolled into the store and met Chuck Heath, Sr. and Jr. during a book signing for their wonderfully gripping newly released book, Our Sarah: Made in Alaska (Kindle).

If you haven’t purchased this book yet, please do so immediately. It is filled with photos and anecdotes of adventures from the Alaskan wilderness to the center stage of a 2008 presidential election.

We had a lovely long visit with the handsome and engaging Heath men, discussing the Mainstream Media’s misrepresentation of Sarah, the beauty of Alaska, and the exciting sport of hunting.

I fondly remember Chuck Sr. asking, while holding and petting Freckles, “what is this breed good for?”.  My husband replied, “you’re looking at it,” and we broke out in raucous laughter.

File photo: Our Sarah: Made in Alaska (Kindle) book signing with Gov. Palin’s father and brother, Chuck Heath, Sr. and Jr., the authors, Elizabeth and Gregory, and Freckles. 10/01/2012

Our book signing adventure with Gov. Palin was just as exciting as with the Heaths and will always be one of the most memorable highlights of our lives.
As I was standing in line anticipating a long 90-minute wait before Gov. Palin was scheduled to arrive, we were informed, by the Barnes & Noble staff, that Sarah Palin would be arriving a half hour early. Since it was still only 8:30 a.m. when we were given the news that Gov. Palin would be arriving at 9:30 a.m. instead of 10:00 a.m., the crowd became noticeably more excited and jubilant.

Barnes and Noble further accommodated us with trays of coffee and cookies. Life was good. I was texting, surfing the ‘Net with free WiFi, making new conservative friends and Gov. Palin was only an hour away!

A professional photographer, Shealah Craighead, was there to take photos of Gov. Palin and those attending the book signing. Copies of the photos will soon be available for purchase on-line.

The time flew by quickly chatting with newly made friends.

Then Gov. Palin arrived and the line starting moving forward faster then anticipated.

We reached a point where it was necessary, for security reasons, to store our bags, cameras and phones with the bookstore staff.
The line moved forward again. I saw a tall security guard standing before me as the line curved sharply to the left.

Now, 10 people stood between me and Gov. Palin who was seated at a long table with her beautiful daughter, Piper, and attending staff.

My breathing quickened and my eyes filled with tears of joy as I watched Gov. Palin interact with fans and supporters.

Only four individuals now left between me and the Governor and it would soon be my turn.

***

“If I’m for Christmas, it’s only because I’m for Christ…”, Gov. Palin wrote in her book, “Good Tidings and Great Joy: Protecting the Heart of Christmas (Kindle)”, which can be purchased by going on-line here.

***

As a side note, The Villages Tea Party had set-up shop prior to Gov. Palin’s arrival in the parking lot in front of Barnes & Noble Booksellers. How very fitting.

This story of the connection people feel to Sarah Palin is an example of why Palin is here to stay. She connects with middle America, average Americans, real people with real problems and concerns… because she is one of them; a hard working mother of five… including one with special needs and one who served honorably in the military, married to a blue color worker and union member that takes part in and has won the Iditarod competition, who got tired of the bad politics in Alaska and decided to get involved and make a difference… which she did and still does make a difference every day.  If you don’t know her story, you really should checkout: DVD: Sarah Palin: The Undefeated and Sarah Palin – The Undefeated with Going Rogue: An American Life mp3 Audiobook

December 16, 2013 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Pet Dads With Their Pets (Furkids)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

UCLA Shutterbug – Wyoming Outing

Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

kisses-for-schatze-21

UCLA Schutterbug  -  Kisses for Schatze

Reddit/orangefever  -  Just Wrestling

Papa and Grandpa Talking

UCLA Shutterbug -  Having a PowWow

pups-7-weeks-old-everybodys-dreaming_thumb

UCLA Shutterbug  -  Whole Family is Asleep… Pups 7-Weeks Old

June 17, 2013 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, pet fun, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Pet Parents Share Their New Year’s Resolutions

click image to open/close

Pets rejoice! A recent survey shows that many pet parents are making New Year’s resolutions to spend more time with their pets and make sure they are loved even more than they were last year.

More than 1,000 pet parents, including hundreds of Kibblers, recently participated in the Halo, Purely for Pets Pet Parents’ New Year’s Resolution Survey.

According to the survey, many pet parents want to do a better job grooming their pets, with 68.1 percent resolving to trim their pets’ nails more often, 52.6 percent planning to give their dogs and cats more baths, and more than 80 percent committing to more frequent brushings. A little more than 35 percent plan to give their pets supplements to help their coat and skin. Finally, the pets may not like this, but a full 50 percent of pet owners plan to brush their pets’ teeth more often.

Interestingly, nearly 46 percent of respondents plan to help their pets lose weight. Considering that recent studies show that more than 50 percent of dogs and cats are overweight, this awareness and recognition among pet owners is encouraging in the battle against pet obesity.

The majority (68.7 percent) of respondents with overweight pets plan to help their pets drop pounds by increasing exercise and 44 percent are going to feed their pets better quality food. A little more than 35 percent are going to reduce the amount of food their pets eat.

An overwhelming number (94.1 percent) of those surveyed plan to help pets in need this year, with nearly 70 percent saying they will donate to a rescue or shelter. Other ways respondents say they’ll help pets in need include fostering (11.9 percent), adopting another pet (11.5 percent) and playing freekibble.com or freekibblekat.com to earn Halo Spot’s Stew donations for shelters (45.5 percent).

Survey respondents were invited to share additional resolutions. Among our favorites:

“Get an RV so we don’t have to leave them for vacation.”
“Train my cat to be a therapy animal.”
“More car and wagon rides.”
“To keep his wellness vet visits.”
“Attempt to walk my cats using a harness.”
“Not to shoo my cats away when I’m watching Ellen.”
“Take them to the beach.”
“Hand make toys and cushions for them.”
“Make sure he drinks more water.”
“Build new cat trees.”
“Train my dog to ride to the dog park in his Harley side car.”

Looks like it’s going to be a great 2012 for the pets!

By Caroline Golon – Kibbler

January 5, 2012 Posted by | Dogs, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Outreach for Pets, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Nutrition, Pets | , , , | Leave a comment

Can Cats and Dogs Catch Swine Flu?

White

Pet parents of dogs and cats can relax for now, say ASPCA veterinarians. While the 2009 H1N1 virus—a faster moving and possibly more debilitating strain of influenza than the typical seasonal flu—has become an international concern, the virus, referred to as swine flu when first identified, appears to present little risk of infecting dogs and cats. However, viruses can mutate quickly and taking important preventative measures remains essential.

“Many species can become infected with influenza viruses, but the current 2009 H1N1 virus, which is a mixture of genetic material from different species, has not been identified in animal populations in the United States to date,” says Dr. Miranda Spindel, Director of ASPCA Veterinary Outreach. “These viruses are notoriously unpredictable, though, and it is important that we remain vigilant.”

In terms of other animals who are susceptible, Dr. Spindel warns that influenza or flu viruses are occasionally transmitted from people to pigs, and the 2009 H1N1 virus has also been identified in turkeys. Pet parents of Vietnamese Potbellies, African Pygmies and other pet pigs should monitor their animals’ health closely, notify their veterinarian of any signs of illness and speak to their veterinarian about influenza type A vaccines. And ferrets are susceptible to most human flu viruses, so pet parents should take extra care to prevent exposure of pet ferrets to people or other ferrets with flu symptoms.

Meanwhile, flu season is upon us and pet parents should take common-sense preventative measures to keep their dogs and cats healthy:

  • If your dog is exhibiting flu-like symptoms, including coughing, nasal discharge or fever (normal dog and cat temperature is 101 to 102.5 degrees), play it safe and avoid taking him to places like dog parks, where he can pass on germs or come into contact with unvaccinated or sick dogs.
  • Avoid letting your cat roam freely outside.
  • If your dog comes into frequent contact with other dogs or is kept in a kennel, the ASPCA recommends that you discuss with your veterinarian whether vaccination against canine influenza may be appropriate. Note: canine influenza and H1N1 are not the same virus.
  • Talk to your vet about what flu vaccines are currently available, and be sure all your pets get vaccinated!
  • Don’t let your pet share water bowls, food dishes or toys with other animals.
  • Make sure your pet is eating, drinking and playing as he normally does each day. If you notice your pet behaving unusually, or if he has flu-like symptoms, check in with your veterinarian immediately.

Read the ASPCA’s official statement on swine flu.

Do you Twitter? Use this hashtag to tweet on this article: @aspca and #PetsandSwineFlu

Related Resources:

Posted:  Just One More Pet

October 4, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Market Watch: Stocks Driven by ‘Pet Parents’

Market Watch: Stocks Driven by 'Pet Parents'NEW YORK — It was relatively a quiet week for the pet industry in terms of the market place, but it did bring the announcement of a new president for a newly formed group, the filing of a Form 8-K for a stock sale and a little insight into the industry’s growth — driven by the dawning age of “pet parents.”

Welcome, Madame President

On Thursday, Sept. 24, Henry Schein Inc. (Nasdaq: HSIC) announced the appointment of Lonnie Shoff as president of Henry Schein Global Healthcare Specialties Group.

Henry Schein is primarily in the dental products business but also distributes animal health products, in addition to software systems to dentists, medical doctors and animal health clinics.

Within Global Healthcare Specialties Group — a newly formed division — Shoff will be responsible for the dental specialties and global exclusive brands. Previously, Shoff was at Roche Diagnostics for more than 20 years, where she was senior vice president and general manager of the Applied Science group, as well as in charge of U.S. commercial operations for the $350 million group.

Henry Schein’s stock price has been steadily increasing for the past six months with a 52-week low of $32per share but has remained above $50 per share in the past month. As of press time, the announcement of Shoff’s appointment appears to have no significant effect on the stock price.

8-K Filed for Sale of Stock

On Friday, Sept. 18, MWI Veterinary Supply Inc. (Nasdaq: MWIV), which distributes pharmaceuticals, vaccines, diagnostics, capital equipment, supplies, veterinary pet food, and nutritional products to veterinarians, filed a Form 8-K with the SEC concerning a trading plan created by its parent company, Agri Beef Co.

Sold to the beef producer in 1981, the form disclosed “that Agri Beef Co. has entered into a pre-arranged stock trading plan to sell a limited number of their shares of the [MWI’s] common stock. The 10b5-1 Plan entered into by Agri Beef Co. allows for the sale of a maximum of 227,346 shares of the company’s common stock through August 31, 2010.”

Following the announcement last Friday, the company’s stock saw a slight jump Monday and Tuesday reaching more than $42 per share but generally appears to be remaining in its previous range for the past month between $38 and $40 per share. The 52-week range for the company’s stock is $20.16 to $42.21 per share.

Why PetMed Express Could Grow & Grow

Last Thursday, Sept. 17, the Motley Fool’s Matt Koppenheffer named seven stocks he predicted would surely grow over the next several years and PetMed Express (Nasdaq: PETS) was one of the lucky seven.

But, his reasoning appeared to have nothing to do with luck but rather healthy financials — citing almost no debt, positive cash flow and doubling of revenue in four years — as well as pet owners.

As Koppenheffer puts it: “Gone are the days when Fido was relegated to the backyard and treated like, well, an animal. Pet owners increasingly see their pets as a part of the family, and in many cases are as concerned about the well-being of their dog or cat as they would be about a child.”

PetMed’s stock has fluctuated in the past year, at times below $13 per share but has remained steadily above $17 per share for the past two months.

That’s the latest business news in the pet industry. Stay tuned for another round-up at the end of next week.

By:  Jennifer Fernicola – business correspondent for Zootoo Pet News.

Posted:  Just One More Pet

September 27, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Just One More Pet, pet products, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Company Will Start Building “The World’s Most Pet-Friendly House” But Here Are Some Hints For All Pet Parents…

dalmation, parrot and other pets

Protect your beloved pets from everyday hazards in your home…

Pets are more than just animals. Our furry, feathered, and finned friends require time, attention, and as safe and comfortable a home as we do. “Most people don’t think about pets when buying or building houses—not even the pet owners themselves,” says David Beart of professorshouse.com, a Canadian company that will start building “the world’s most pet-friendly house” at the end of this year. “Over half of all homes have pets living in them, but animals are still an afterthought when it comes to home improvements,” says Beart. “What I really want to get across is much more than just creating the world’s most pet-friendly house,” Beart adds. “It’s about making people think of pets with importance rather than as possessions, or even disposable.”

When you’re planning a home for both you and your pets, consider their particular needs. Think about whether you’re putting your door-dashing dog on a high-traffic street. Will your protective pup go postal on guests? How can you make your multi-story home comfortable for your elderly dog? What common household items are hazardous to pets and not humans? (Last year, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) handled more than 140,000 cases of pets exposed to toxic substances and hazardous things in their own homes.) Keep reading to learn what you should be looking for, and how a little planning can go a long way to help you streamline your daily routine and keep your pet safe and happy.

All-Fours Inspection

Try to think like your pet to get a sense of what might be dangerous to them. The pros at Purina suggest that the best way to start is by taking “a puppy’s eye-view” of things. You have to put yourself in your pet’s place—and get down on all fours—to take a look around. Make sure you inspect areas that your pet can access by way of climbing or jumping. You’d be surprised at the dangers a periodic inspection of your home can reveal. Here are some hazards to look for (although they may not be all you find):

•Look for choking, strangulation, electrocution, and suffocation hazards. Keep window treatment cords short and cut through any loops, and unplug or cover wires and electrical cords.
•Don’t leave human foods and medications where pets can access them. Eliminate “ladders” that curious pets can climb to access elevated areas like countertops and tabletops. Discard perishable trash daily to keep pets from rummaging through it.

Between trips to the curb, keep trash odors (and pet temptation) low with baking soda and a tight-fitting lid. One pet-owner favorite is the stainless steel and rubber Vipp Trash Can with foot-pedal.

If pets get into the trash, they can chew chicken bones into shards, get to choking hazards like fruit seeds and cores—and your house is going to be a mess. Note that many fruit seeds contain natural contaminants that can result in potentially fatal cyanide poisoning in dogs: Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure, caffeine in coffee grinds and chocolate are also toxic, sugar-free foods and gums containing Xylitol can cause liver failure, and nutmeg can cause tremors, seizures, and central nervous system damage. See the ASPCA’s list of  Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pet. If you think your pet has ingested something hazardous, call the ASPCA Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435 right away.

•Make sure indoor plants are varieties that are pet-safe. Lilies can cause kidney failure in cats. Other common, but toxic, plants include amaryllis, poinsettia, mums, and aloe vera. See the ASPCA’s database of Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants before bringing a new plant home.

•Pets can often maneuver cupboards open to access home cleaning products, pesticides, fertilizers, and other hazardous items. Consider latching them shut. Keep rooms where you set out rodenticides and traps off limits to your pet.

•Not letting your pet ingest antifreeze seems like a no-brainer. But, the smell and taste of the stuff is especially appealing to both cats and dogs. In fact, approximately 10,000 pets die every year as a result of antifreeze poisoning from as little as a drop. Keep it stored in a latched cabinet or on a high shelf, and use it carefully, cleaning up any drips or spills immediately.

•Keep your toilet lid down, especially if you use automatic bowl cleaners, to eliminate risk of poisoning. Keeping the lid down also eliminates a drowning hazard.

•The number of cats that fall out of windows is so high, that the veterinary profession has coined the term High-Rise Syndrome. If you must open windows, make sure that screens are sturdy and properly installed. Window guards are not adequate protection for cats, who can easily fit through the bars.

Carving Out a Space

Kittens and pups will sneak into an opened dryer (or other small, dangerous places) the first chance they get. Give them their own space and you won’t have to worry about them seeking refuge where they don’t belong. A hazard-free zone, with a cozy bed, water source, and safe toys will do the trick. Other convenient features include a sink to wash feeding bowls, and adequate storage for accessories. Remember that well-exercised pets are less likely to get into trouble, and more likely to rest well at night instead of barking or whining for attention. If it’s possible, create a pet area in a mudroom with cat or doggy door access to a fenced-in yard, corral, or dog run so that they can head outdoors at their leisure.

Litter boxes should be placed away from feeding areas and in a place that’s private, but not too isolated. If your pet doesn’t feel safe or comfortable using a litter box, he won’t. Elderly pets should be given an area on the ground level, and weepads should be accessible. Consider placement of ramps to furniture if you allow your elderly pet that kind of access. If you’re not home for most of the day, you’re presented with a special set of concerns: Consider a pet fountain so that fresh water is readily available. Leave your pet with sturdy toys that won’t break to reveal small parts. Interactive treat toys made of high-impact plastic, like the Buster Cube from Doctors Foster and Smith, will keep your pets occupied and stay in one piece. If your pet is especially curious, consider crate training him or blocking off a small, safe area with a baby gate.

Paw-Safe Flooring and Fabrics

Go with fabrics and flooring materials that’ll make less work for you. Stylish, easy-care leather or ultrasuede can be wiped clean and won’t be dramatically affected by wear. Crypton Super Fabric is a synthetic germ- and stain-resistant option made with pet owners in mind. It’s available in a variety of custom colors and patterns and the Crypton online store offers couture pet beds, “Throver” furniture covers, and decorative pillows.

Carpet isn’t the best choice for pet owners, but if you must go wall-to-wall, choose a color that matches your pet (it’ll mask pet hair) with a performance rating of 3.5 or higher. For lightweight dogs, hardwood with adequate urethane finish is a common and easy-clean choice. For heavier dogs, ceramic tile or another nonporous hard surface flooring would be best. See Pet-Friendly Flooring for more ideas.

Clean Pet, Clean House

Groom your pet yourself, and you’ll save up to $100 per visit to pros. You’ll also spend less time cleaning house. Regular nail clipping keeps scratch damage down, while regular brushing keeps hair in the brush instead of, well, everywhere else. Brush before and after a wash to keep drain-clogging hair to a minimum. Vacuum twice a week with a machine like the DC17 Animal Vac by Dyson designed especially for homes with pets. It features a mini turbine head to lift hair and dirt from upholstery, stairs, and vehicles. The design allows for hygienic bin emptying and includes a lifetime HEPA filter. For a quick clean up, pass strips of packing tape or a wet plastic kitchen glove over clothing and surfaces to pick up stray hairs.

If your pet inherits furniture and flooring that isn’t ideal, then you’ll have to become a master at stain removal and disinfecting. Monitor your pet so accidents can be handled promptly. The longer a stain sits, the harder it’ll be to remove, and your pet will be more likely to sniff out the same spot for a repeat offense. Look for special cleaning products with natural enzymes to break down stains and odors. Pros recommend OdorLogic CleanAway and OdorLogic OxyQuick (for fresh stains). Finally, pay attention to flea and tick prevention and control. If the pests are on your pet, then odds are flea eggs, pupae, and larvae are in your carpeting, bedding, and yard.

Petscaping Your Yard

If you let your pets out into the yard, flea and tick prevention isn’t your only concern. You’ll have to determine whether you need to build or add structures, install invisible fences, and identify toxic plants in your landscape. The ASPCA keeps an extensive database of plants that are hazardous to dogs, cats, and even horses. Some such plants are azaleas, some ferns and ivies, daffodils, and daylilies. Pet-friendly plants include bamboo and, of course, catnip. Search the ASPCA Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants database before you put something in the ground. Insecticides and fertilizers were among the ASPCA’s top 10 pet poisons in 2008, so consider organic gardening.

Feeding Time

Buying bulk to save on pet food? Then you have to store it appropriately to avoid contamination and slow the vitamin and nutrient degradation process. Check for tears in food packages before you buy them. The Food & Drug Administration (FDA) advises against using feeding dishes to scoop food out of packages. Assign a clean spoon or small container for scooping. FDA guidelines for food storage call for leftover wet food to be refrigerated at 40 degrees Fahrenheit, and dry food to be stored in its original bag, then placed in a clean, food-grade plastic container, and stored at 80 degrees Fahrenheit or less. Placing the bag in a container will also keep unwanted insects and rodents away. Note that dry foods are more nutritious and less susceptible to contamination or spoilage than wet foods are.

Storing bulk food in large trash cans in the garage is a fairly common practice, but this exposes food to temperature extremes in a container that can leach dyes and additives into food over time. Make sure you purchase a special food storage container, or visit a local food establishment to claim a food-grade plastic bucket that’ll soon be headed for the trash heap.

Small Animals

“Too often parents buy small pets and fish for their children as learning tools, but those pets are even more fragile than cats and dogs,” Beart explains. “The average lifespan of a hamster, for example, is about 3 years. In many homes, the pet hardly ever lasts more than a few months.” Here are some helpful tips that’ll ensure the safety and longevity of your small pets:

Hamsters

•They tend to be active at night and asleep during the day. For that reason, you’ll want make sure your pet’s exercise wheel isn’t a squeaky one.
•Provide at least 2 inches of bedding to allow for normal burrowing behavior. Use shredded tissue or paper, or clean processed corncob. Commonly used cedar chips are associated with respiratory and live disease in rodents. Clean cages and refresh bedding at least once a week.
•Many hamsters must be kept in cages by themselves after the age of 10 weeks. Adult females are especially hostile to one another, so do your homework before you consider grouping.

Guinea Pigs

•Their bodies cannot produce Vitamin C, so you’ll have to supplement it with an appropriate product from your pet supply store.
•Guinea pig’s teeth grow constantly, so chew toys are essential.

Rabbits

•They actually learn litter box habits quickly and easily. Keep in mind that they like to chew and may hide in small, dark spaces. When you allow your pet time out of his cage for exercise, consider cord protectors, securely cover ducts and vents, and always locate your pet before sitting down and opening and closing recliners.

Birds

•Cage placement is very important: Keep the cage away from windows and radiators to protect your bird from drafts and direct exposure to heat. Many birds prefer to have a safe corner to back into, and if a cage is placed away from walls or toward the center of a room, it can make your pet feel insecure. Cage placement away from windows also means your bird won’t always be anxiously guarding itself from “predators” like your neighbors dog and other passing animals.
•They perch and take cover in the wild, so provide these opportunities in their cages. Your bird’s foot should wrap around approximately 2/3 of each perch and toes should never meet and overlap. Irritation, injury, and infection may result if perches are too small.
•Kitchens are a common place for pet-owners to keep their bird cages. Be aware that birds have very sensitive respiratory systems, and fumes emitted from overheated nonstick cookware could be fatal.
•Do your homework when looking for pet birds: Some species, like social finches, require companionship while others will do fine on their own.

Fish

•Though fish are widely considered the most “disposable” of pets, you can greatly reduce tank mortality by creating the ideal water conditions for the type of fish you have. Required temperatures and pH levels depend upon the kind of fish you have. Research the requirements of your breed and monitor their conditions periodically.
•When adding new swimmers to your tank, consider the types of fish you already have. Some species may be aggressive or even attempt to eat other fish. Tell a pro at the pet store what’s already in your tank, and ask if the fish you want to group are compatible.

By: Tabitha Sukhai, This Old House Magazine

Posted:  Just One More Pet

August 12, 2009 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Pet Adoption, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, pet products, Pets, responsible pet ownership, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Doggy MRIs: Pampered pets receive state of the art health care

When a pet gets sick, many owners will pay almost anything to be sure he gets better.

Fluffy and Fido tug at an owner’s heart. So we buy the highest quality pet food or a special formula depending on if he’s young or old or too chubby. Or, for the more holistic-minded, an owner might opt for an organic, vitamin-enriched dog or cat food.

And when a pet gets sick, many owners will pay almost anything to be sure he gets better, including chemotherapy for cancer, a kidney transplant or hip replacement surgery.

Humans have ancient relations with their animal companions. Burial evidence of cats as pets dates back over 8,000 years and for dogs about half that long. These early pets provided their masters with both companionship and survival skills such as hunting assistance, according to experts.

Over the years, as domesticated cats and dogs became increasingly docile, the pet-human relationship evolved. And while an animal’s survival instincts may have been compromised along the way – how many of our pets could actually support themselves in the wild? – there are some perks.

Today, with pets considered more like four-footed people, owners are laying out big bucks for such pet-pampering services as styling salons, doggie day camps, and massage therapy.

And modern pets are also reaping the benefits of human technological advances with more animals receiving medical treatments such as chemotherapy, organ transplants, radiation, CAT scans, MRIs, laser surgery, root canals and even braces.

And in the case of MRIs, “your dog or cat can get an MRI faster than us as humans,” Randy Valpy of Petplan Insurance told the Toronto Star.

According to the report, these increasingly advanced health care options for animals come at no small expense. A dog or cat can receive state of the art imaging, for example, for about $1,000 and radiation therapy for as much as $5,000. And if you want an ultrasound, prepare to pay from $400 to $800.

The Ontario Veterinary College’s Teaching Hospital at Guelph offers radiation therapy for dogs and cats with cancer. Treatment of an animal ranges from $500 to $5,000.

Depending on the severity of the condition, an owner can pay tens of thousands of dollars for a pet’s veterinary care. And as a result, more people are considering pet insurance as a means of protecting their animals – and their wallets.

“We’ve seen invoices that run from $10,000 to $30,000 to treat a variety of conditions,” said Peter Weinstein, medical director for Veterinary Pet Insurance in California. The company sold more than 360,000 pet insurance policies in 2005, vs. 157,000 in 2000.

And about 1,100 U.S. companies offer VPI’s pet insurance as an employee benefit, he added.
Depending on the plan, pet insurance in Canada can cost from $9.95 to $90 a month, with the average cost somewhere around $30. Many insurance companies, including Petplan, Petcare, and PC Financial Pet Insurance, offer potential customers online quotes for a range of coverage plans.

Sophisticated medical treatments and surgical techniques have undoubtedly boasted the life span of pets. “Thirty years ago in the U.S. the average age of a dog was 4 years; the average age of a cat was 3 years,” Bonnie Beaver, past president of the American Veterinary Medical Association told CNN.

Today, the average lifespan of a dog is between eight and 12 years, says Beaver.

Pet owners report ‘unconditional love’ as the main reason for Fido and Fluffy-fretting— to the tune of billions of dollars in North America each year.

Article By: Cynthia Ross Cravit – 50Plus.com

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Related Resources:

August 2, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

For these moms, a dog-day afternoon

Pedro and Princesa, a pair of very well-dressed Chihuahuas, scampered into Unleashed Indoor Dog Park like a couple late for the party.

After all, it was Mother’s Day, and Princesa and Pedro were here to celebrate with their “mom,” Betty Orellana.

Pedro, one handsome little dude, was decked out in a bright print shirt, khakis, tinted shades and the tiniest sandals imaginable – until you saw the shoes on Princesa, who accented her look with a sparkly frock that exactly matched mom’s vivid green blouse.

The oohs and ahhs followed in their wake – “Look, look!” and “Aww, how cute!” in several variations – and Orellana doted on her kids like any proud momma.

“Their father passed away about a year ago in a motorcycle accident,” said Orellana, of Mesquite, “and we didn’t get to have kids.

“Pedro and Princesa are my children. They’re the only kids I have.”

So she decided to go out with the kids, to a party with other moms and their “fur babies” to be treated and pampered and, for once, to feel they weren’t left out on Mother’s Day.

“It’s wonderful!” Orellana said. “When one of the ladies here told me they were having a special Mother’s Day, I couldn’t believe it!”

Kelly Acree, an owner and co-founder of Unleashed in Far East Dallas, said that when she and her partners assembled a business plan for the indoor dog park – the first of what they hope will be many – they noticed an interesting demographic development.

“We saw that young people weren’t getting married as early as they used to, and that a lot of single guys and girls have a pet as a ‘child,’ ” Acree said. “There’s a real trend in society – more humanization of pets. It used to be they spent their time out in the yard. Now they sleep in the bed with you.”

And the pets help meet basic human needs of love and companionship for people who often have no one else.

Call it puppy love.

“I don’t know what I would have done without Pedro when my husband died,” Orellana said. “He sure filled a void when I lost the man I loved.”

Across the room, new arrival Carrie Johnson of Dallas took in the scene – lots and lots of women and men and a whole bunch of dogs romping and wagging and having a great time.

The grown-ups carried gift bags and sipped wine and nibbled candy or cakes, or maybe enjoyed the ministrations of a masseuse. And the dogs were busy being dogs.

“This is so cool,” Johnson said, leading in Sebastian, a little fluff ball of a Shi-Tzu.

“Mother’s Day can be hard when don’t have children. You feel like it isn’t a day for you.

“But this is a day for all of us.

By: MICHAEL E.YOUNG / The Dallas Morning News

Related Articles:

May 11, 2009 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Events, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Reverse Sneezing, Chihuahua Honks or Mechanosensitive Aspiration Reflex

Reverse sneezing:  Mechanosensitive Aspiration Reflex or Paroxysmal Respiration isn’t a sneeze at all and isn’t an illness, but it is a condition that small dog owners should be aware of.

b-and-w-chiIf you have ever been startled by your dog or cat exhibiting snorting, honking and gasping noises you have probably experienced reverse sneezing.  It makes you feel helpless while you watch your canine or feline friend appear to be struggling to breathe, but although alarming, especially to a first time pet owner, it appears and sounds much worse than it is.

There is no reason to panic. Reverse sneezing is not a serious condition andgenerally poses no threat to a dog or cat”s health or longevity. They are not having a seizure, and it also actually has nothing to do with sneezing, but is a spasm caused by an irritation of the soft palate. The soft palate is a soft, fleshy tissue extension off the hard palate, or roof of the mouth. Small dogs in particular can exhibit this behavior and certain breeds may be predisposed to it. It has sent many a distraught owner to the vet in panic.

Reverse Sneeze Videos: 

Reverse Sneeze

Maggie reverse sneezes 

Puggle Preston Reverse Sneezing

Some animals can have this condition for their entire lives, or it may develop as the dog ages. During the spasm, the pet will usually turn their elbows outward and extend their neck while gasping inwards with a distinctive snorting sound. Gently massaging the throat area or pinching their nostrils shut so they must breath through their mouth can help shorten the episode. Sometimes taking the pet outside in the fresh air stops the spasm. Once the attack ceases, all goes back to normal.

(Another technique sometimes used to stop a bout of canine reverse sneezing by behavior specialist Sarah Wilson is to try to get the dog to swallow, touching the back of the tongue if that is safe.  Sounds like it would work with a cat as well.)

It is thought that the pharyngeal spasm can be caused by a number of irritants, including dust and pollen, or household chemicals. Moreover, some dogs can launch an episode after eating, drinking or running around, becoming anxious or excited or while pulling on the leash.

If your pet (more dogs than cats suffer from it) experiences this behavior fairly frequently and the episodes are severe, a trip to the vet is in order to determine other possible causes, which can include viral infections, polyps, excessive soft palate tissue, and nasal mites. However, many cases of reverse sneezing appear to have no identifiable cause.

A small Chihuahua Beagle mix, Cela, was extremely prone to severe middle-of-the-night reverse sneezing episodes when she first came to her terrified then-foster mom (now adoptive mom) sending them both to the vet in alarm. The vet anesthetized Cela and explored the little dog’s sinus cavities as best she could to see if anything was embedded in her sinus passages. Nothing was found, and after a short course of anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics, Cela recovered completely.

In hindsight, it seems quite likely that the time of year, autumn, with its accompanying proliferation of allergens, combined with the stress of being in a new household, may have contributed to Cela’s pronounced reverse sneezing. Since the initial episodes subsided, the little dog has had only one or two minor incidences.

Reverse sneezing appears a lot worse than it is, generally posing no health threats whatsoever. Typically, an episode of reverse sneezing will end soon on its own. Nevertheless, understanding and recognizing the syndrome can go a long way toward helping pet owners and their dogs or cats cope with it. Reverse sneezing should not be confused with Collapsed Trachea, a congenital condition characterized by a frequent cough, a honking rather than a snorting sound, and shortness of breath.

Tracheal collapse is a progressive, chronic, debilitating disease occurring primarily in middle-aged toy-breed dogs.  Pomeranians, Poodles, Yorkshire Terriers, and Chihuahuas are most commonly affected.  The clinical signs of tracheal collapse are a chronic nonproductive cough, exercise intolerance, and varying degrees of dyspnea.  The cough often resembles a “honking-sound.”  Clinical signs are exacerbated by excitement or anxiety and may proceed to collapse and syncope. The dorsal membrane and cartilage rings are both involved in the degenerative process.  The rings become hypoplastic or fibrodystrophic and cannot maintain the normal C-shaped configuration. 

Dogs or cats suffering from a reverse sneeze may stand up, extend their neck, make snorting or honking noises, open their mouth, and appear distressed and frightened. Reverse sneezing is triggered by an irritant or activity that initiates the reflex. For some pets this can occur when they are excited, exercising or eating and drinking too fast. The pressure of a collar on the trachea during leash walking also can set off spasms. And reverse sneezing can be associated with allergies, viruses, pollen, foreign bodies, postnasal drip, perfumes, chemical odors, tumors or infections.

Another common cause of reverse sneezing in dogs is the nasal mite Pneumonyssoides caninum. These small mites live in the nasopharynx of dogs and are a source of constant irritation. The mites are extremely small and difficult to visualize, but easy to treat with routine anti-parasitic dewormers.

Brachycephalic animals, those with short noses, are more prone to reverse sneezing. Reverse sneezing closely resembles asthma, a common cause of respiratory distress in cats. Asthma can be life-threatening and should be ruled out in cats with respiratory signs.

For many dogs and cats reverse sneezing is a one-time or occasional episode that does not require any treatment.  But if the problem repeats itself and becomes a ‘chronic condition’, treatment may be necessary. The first step to treating the spasms is to identify the underlying cause. Antihistamines work well for allergic reactions, while the removal of offensive odors and chemicals will help those animals with sensitivities. If the pet has a nasal discharge or airflow through the nostrils is reduced, then other measures will need to be taken.

Rhinoscopy is the diagnostic tool of choice when examining the nasopharynx. Foreign bodies, nasal tumors or fungal infections can be diagnosed with plain film X-rays of the head.  For severe cases surgery is available.

Related Articles:

May 4, 2009 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Can My Pet Catch Swine Flu?

Pig

Don’t worry, pet parents! The recent, rapid outbreak of the H1N1 virus, previously known as swine flu, appears to present little risk of infecting our furry friends. In the past few weeks, only humans have been affected by the new virus, and it’s still unknown how the virus will impact other species.

“Currently there’s no data demonstrating any risk of dogs and cats contracting this strain of the virus,” says Dr. Louise Murray, Director of Medicine at the ASPCA’s Bergh Memorial Hospital in New York City. “However, owners of pet pigs, as well as farmers, should monitor their animals’ health more closely and take steps to limit transmission from humans to pigs and vice versa.”

If you do count a pet pig as your animal companion, please consult with your veterinarian about a Type A influenza vaccine, which is available and recommended for all healthy swine.

Dr. Miranda Spindel, Director of ASPCA Veterinary Outreach, adds: “Swine influenza or swine flu is one of the leading causes of respiratory disease in swine throughout the world. Like most influenza A viruses, swine flu generally causes high levels of illness in pigs, but fatalities are uncommon.”

For the latest information about the outbreak and your pet’s health, please visit the Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu). If you suspect your pet is ill or if he exhibits any sudden changes in behavior, please contact your veterinarian immediately.

Read the ASPCA’s official statement on swine flu.

May 2, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets | , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 231 other followers