JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Quickie Homemade Dog Treats

1-3/4 CUPS WHOLE-WHEAT FLOUR
2, 4.5-OUNCH JARS MEAT FLAVORED BABY FOOD
1/2 CUP BEEF/CHICKEN/VEG. BROTH OR SUFFICIENT FOR PROCESSING

PREHEAT OVEN TO 350 DEGREES. LIGHTLY OIL BOTTOM OF COOKIE SHEET.

IN LARGE BOWL, USING FORK, COMBINE FLOUR & BABY FOOD, MIXING WELL BLENDED & FORM INTO VERY SOFT DOUGH.

IF MIXTURE IS A LITTLE DRY, ADD BEEF BROTH 1/4 CUP AT A TIME UNTIL DOUGH PULLS AWAY FROM BOWL.

PINCH OFF SMALL PIECES OF DOUGH AND BETWEEN FLOURED HANDS, ROOL INTO SMALL BALLS.

PLACE BALLS ON OILED BAKING PAN 1/2 INCH APART & FLATTTEN WITH BACK OF FORK TO 1/4-INCH THICK.

BAKE @ 350 DEGREES IN CENTER OF OVEN FOR 18 TO 20 MINUTES (OR UNTIL TOPS ARE GOLDEN BROWN).

REMOVE COOKIE SHEET FROM OVEN & LET REST A FEW MINUTES. REMOVE COOKIES FROM PAN. ALLOW TO COOL TO ROOM TEMPERATURE. STORE IN NON-AIRTIGHT CONTAINER

January 16, 2009 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Just One More Pet Rescue Adoption Saturday (Pattison)

Just One More Pet Rescue held an adoption day at the Pattison Car show on Saturday, October 11th, in Pattison, TX, (3 miles north of Brookshire). See http://www.pattisoncarshow.com for information. All of the animals that were available for adoption had been picked up from the roads of Waller County, because there is no animal control department there. All of the dogs were housetrained, crate comfortable and well mannered, their ad stated.
Just One More Pet Rescue is a kennel free home where all dogs are treated equally regardless if they reside with them for a short time, or longer.  They had rescued several nice dogs and puppies and also several kittens that were available for adoption.
We are honored to share a name with them and would encourage others to look at this model and consider doing the same. There number is 832-279-4739 and we are sure they would appreciate donations.  Last week, before the event, they found new homes for 4 puppies and one kitten!
We would also encourage event organizers to invite local pet rescue groups to be part of your next event to encourage the adoption of abandoned pets and animals.
Keep up the good work… and open your heart to ‘Just One More Pet’!  Every pet deserves a good home… and no pet should be euthenized because of a lack of homes.
By: Ask Marion at Just One More Pet

October 23, 2008 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Stroke Heroes and Their Pets

I have two cats. Buddy is a large tabby tom cat that I found in a snow bank when he was a kitten. He was very young, weak, thin, and had frostbite on the tip of his ear and part of a paw. I can only guess that a thoughtless owner of a litter of kittens tried to get rid of them. I only found one.  Lucy is a smaller tabby queen that I inherited when she was a kitten. She is my granddaughter’s cat.  I am the permanent foster mom since my granddaughter is not allowed to have another cat in her apartment building. Buddy and Lucy are best of friends. One entertains the other and they are usually found rolled up in a big ball of fur on the couch. They are strictly indoor cats.

Over 16 years after having two strokes, I’ve had a dog, bird, and now the cats. The bird was a cockatiel named Kato that I taught to talk, or perhaps the bird taught me to talk too as I was aphasic (a language problem caused by stroke or damage to the brain which leads to trouble speaking, understanding, writing, or reading) post-stroke. Eventually, the bird talked so much that I couldn’t keep him quiet! When I was on the phone he must have thought I was talking to him and would go on and on about how pretty he was and screeched out to “Be quiet! I’m studying!” It wasn’t difficult to figure out that the old bird had picked that quip up from my years at the university.

The dog was a miniature schnauzer named Cindy. She was our family pet when the kids were young. Cindy used to dance on her hind legs when we played the piano. I’m not sure if it was because she wanted to do a jig or because she wanted us to stop playing. Either way, she added great joy to our family.

Now, the children have grown and I live alone. But I am never lonely with Buddy and Lucy around. As a pet owner I have the responsibility of making sure they are fed each day and are provided fresh water. I make sure they are current with their immunizations and vet checks. I brush them at least once a week. And I talk to them too. Not that they understand me but they do react to the intonation of my voice. Believe it or not, they sleep with me too. No matter how many times I’ve sent them from my room they always come back to cuddle. Buddy curls up by my abdomen and Lucy wraps around my lower legs. Everyone is comfortable, except when I move they seem disturbed and meow their discontent.

Pets are important to all of us. After a stroke, pets can be wonderful housemates as well as giving us an opportunity to care for something else other than ourselves. Pets can heal our souls too. Cindy made me laugh when she danced to music. The cockatiels comb was always messy and he’d cock his head and look at you just to make you smile. The cats play with my knitting yarn then run and hide as if to say, “I didn’t do it!” All of these little creatures have added enjoyment to my life. They have helped me to keep depression, a side effect of stroke, at bay. They have helped me realize that I am an important individual in their lives as well as my own. 

by  Cleo Hutton @ MyHeartCentral

Permalink: http://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2008/10/16/stroke-heroes-and-their-pets/

October 16, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Vote Yes on California Prop 2 – End Farm Animal Abuse!

STOP ANIMAL CRUELTY!!!

Tomorrow, on the “Oprah” show, I’ll be making the case to millions of people that California’s Proposition 2, if successful, will end the cruel confinement of 20 million farm animals.

I’m also excited to tell you that The New York Times endorsed Prop 2 last week — a huge win for the campaign. As you probably know, Prop 2 will end the practice of cramming farm animals into cages and crates so small the animals can’t even turn around, lie down, or extend their limbs.

If passed, Prop 2 will be the biggest victory for farm animals in California’s history.

But standing in the way is Big Agribusiness, which is pouring millions of dollars into a deceptive campaign here to defeat Prop 2 and preserve factory farms’ cruel confinement practices.

The next 21 days before the election will be pivotal — and we can’t win without your support and your vote on Election Day.

Here’s the latest news, and a few ways you can help:

Watch Oprah
On tomorrow’s show (Tuesday, October 14), I’ll be going head-to-head with the front men of the agribusiness industry in defense of the 20 million farm animals in California who don’t have room to turn around or stretch their limbs.
Click here to find out when the show will air where you live.

Read the New York Times' Ringing Endorsement
Here’s a snippet: “The fact that such fundamental decencies have to be forced upon factory farming says a lot about its horrors. We urge California voters to pass Proposition 2. We urge every state to enact similar laws.”
Click here to read the full editorial on my blog.

Here are two ways you can help pass this historic measure right now:

1. Support the YES! on Prop 2 campaign by visiting the campaign website and learning about the many ways you can help.

2. If you haven’t already, watch our animated video and pass it along to your neighbors, friends, and family in California.

YES! on Prop 2 is a true grassroots campaign, funded by thousands of small donations from animal lovers like you. By contrast, the deceptive No on Prop 2 campaign is bankrolled by a handful of rich agribusiness corporations from across the country – with an average donation of more than $40,000.

The factory farm industry is blinded by the bottom line. No matter how much money they dump into defeating this measure, they can’t stamp out the truth: Prop 2′s commonsense reforms are long overdue.

Thank you for being a part of this campaign. On November 4, millions of animals will be thanking you, too.

Sincerely,
Wayne Pacelle
Wayne Pacelle
President & CEO
The Humane Society of the United States 

Permalink: http://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2008/10/14/vote-yes-on-ca…nia-prop-2-end/

October 14, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Texts From Elephant Warn Rangers of Trouble

OL PEJETA, Kenya (AP) – The text message from the elephant flashed across Richard Lesowapir’s screen: Kimani was heading for neighboring farms.

Kimani, a huge bull elephant, wears a collar with a mobile phone card that lets rangers know where he is.

Kimani, a huge bull elephant, wears a collar with a mobile phone card that lets rangers know where he is.

The huge bull elephant had a long history of raiding villagers’ crops during the harvest, sometimes wiping out six months of income at a time. But this time a mobile phone card inserted in his collar sent rangers a text message.

Lesowapir, an armed guard and a driver arrived in a jeep bristling with spotlights to frighten Kimani back into the Ol Pejeta conservancy.

Kenya is the first country to try elephant texting as a way to protect both a growing human population and the wild animals that now have less room to roam. Elephants are ranked as “near threatened” in the Red List, an index of vulnerable species published by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

The race to save Kimani began two years ago. The Kenya Wildlife Service had already reluctantly shot five elephants from the conservancy who refused to stop crop-raiding, and Kimani was the last of the regular raiders. The Save the Elephants group wanted to see if he could break the habit.

So they placed a mobile phone SIM card in Kimani’s collar, then set up a virtual “geofence” using a global positioning system that mirrored the conservatory’s boundaries. Whenever Kimani approaches the virtual fence, his collar texts rangers.

They have intercepted Kimani 15 times since the project began. Once almost a nightly raider, he last went near a farmer’s field four months ago.

It’s a huge relief to the small farmers who rely on their crops for food and cash for school fees. Basila Mwasu, a 31-year-old mother of two, lives a stone’s throw from the conservancy fence. She and her neighbors used to drum through the night on pots and pans in front of flaming bonfires to try to frighten the elephants away.

Once an elephant stuck its trunk through a window into a room where her baby daughter was sleeping and the family had stored some corn. She beat it back with a burning stick. Another time, an elephant killed a neighbor who was defending his crop.

“We had to go into town to tell the game [wardens] to chase the elephants away or we’re going to kill them all,” Mwasu remembered.

But the elephants kept coming back.

Batian Craig, the conservation and security manager at the 90,000-acre Ol Pejeta conservancy, says community development programs are of little use if farmers don’t have crops. He recalled the time when 15 families had their harvests wiped out.

“As soon as a farmer has lost his livelihood for six months, he doesn’t give a damn whether he has a school or a road or water or whatever,” he said.

Iain Douglas-Hamilton, founder of Save the Elephants, said the project is still in its infancy — so far only two geofences have been set up in Kenya — and it has its problems.

Collar batteries wear out every few years. Sometimes communities think placing a collar on an elephant implies ownership and responsibility for the havoc it causes. And it’s expensive work: Ol Pejeta has five full-time staff and a standby vehicle to respond when a message flashes across a ranger’s screen.

But the experiment with Kimani has been a success, and last month another geofence was set up in another part of the country for an elephant known as Mountain Bull. Moses Litoroh, the coordinator of Kenya Wildlife Service’s elephant program, hopes the project might help resolve some of the 1,300 complaints the Service receives every year over crop-raiding.

The elephants can be tracked through Google Earth software, helping to map and conserve the corridors they use to move from one protected area to another. The tracking also helps prevent poaching, as rangers know where to deploy resources to guard valuable animals.

But the biggest bonus so far has been the drop in crop-raiding. Douglas-Hamilton says elephants, like teenagers, learn from each other, so tracking and controlling one habitual crop-raider can make a whole group change its habits.

Mwasu’s two young daughters play under the banana trees these sultry evenings without their mother worrying about elephants.

“We can live together,” she said. “Elephants have the right to live, and we have the right to live too.”

October 13, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Chattanooga: Chihuahua Movie Raises Puppy Mill Concerns

(Chattanooga Times/Free Press – McClatchy-TribuneInformation Services via COMTEX) - Papi, the talking lead dog featured in today’s release of the film “Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” says he puts “the ‘wow’ in ‘chee-WOW-wa.’”

But pet advocates are worried Papi’s big-screen presence could spark an unfortunate increase in demand for the tiny canine species. Such a spike encourages puppy mills and might fill shelters with abandoned animals after the movie’s appeal wears off, advocates say.

“Unfortunately, whenever a breed becomes suddenly popular, puppy mills will try to cash in on the trend,” said Leighann McCollum, Tennessee director for the Humane Society. “Chihuahuas have already seen their own detrimental spike after the launch of Taco Bell ads featuring the breed and celebrities making them a popular ‘purse dog.’”

As a species, Chihuahuas can be aggressive, territorial and bark a lot, pet advocates say, and they tend to bond only with a single person, even in a family household. When overbred in bad conditions, some of these bad qualities can be amplified, said Guy Bilyeu, executive director of the Hamilton County Humane Educational Society.

“Small dogs, the Chihuahuas and rat terriers, are some of the more notorious biters out there,” Mr. Bilyeu said.

Giving animals human-like qualities, as happens in “Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” is dangerous, says Donna Deweese, spokeswoman for the McKamey Animal Care and Adoption Center in Chattanooga.

“Movies like this always irritate me, because they have a tendency to portray Chihuahuas as accessories rather than living creatures,” Ms. Deweese said. “People see the animals as jewelry, and they don’t think about their needs.”

That sometimes means animals that are cute at first will find a home at the shelter in a few weeks, Mr. Bilyeu said.

“The first thing people are going to do after this movie is look in the newspaper for Chihuahua pups, but our advice is to know your breeder,” he said. “If you find a breeder, ask to see their facility. Any reputable breeder will be proud to show off their operation.”

“We have a few (Chihuahuas) in our shelter right now,” he said, “and you want to make sure that these animals have been brought up with the quality you would want to have in your home.”

Disney, the company releasing “Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” warns viewers on its Web site not to rush out to adopt or buy the animals.

“Owning a pet is a major responsibility. Dogs require daily care and constant attention. Before bringing a dog into your family, research the specific breed to make sure it is suitable for your particular situation,” the Disney Web site warns.

Ms. McCollum said the Humane Society helped expose a puppy mill in Hickman County, Tenn., in June. About 700 dogs were rescued from the mill southwest of Nashville, and most were Chihuahuas, she said. They were kept in small cages and were diseased, she said.

“We have seen cages of Chihuahuas living in despicable conditions during our recent puppy mill raids, including this summer in Tennessee,” said Stephanie Shain, director of the Humane Society of the United States’ Stop Puppy Mills campaign. “They are one of the most common breeds being churned out by mills due to their small size and the ease in which they can be bred in cramped cages.”

And if you are going to get a dog… decide what type of breed you want, or better yet, don’t want, and then check the shelters and rescues first.   If you buy one at a pet shop, make sure you know they are reputable and do a some questioning and checking into where they get their dogs (animals).  Also ask yourself if you have the ability to properly care for a pet or make arrangements for them if are gone a lot.  Pets like children are a full time commitment and should be a lifetime decision.  

And if you suspect pet abuse or that people are raising pets in unfit or unsanitary conditions, report them.

Permalink: http://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2008/10/04/chattanooga-ch…-mill-concerns

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Adopting A Senior Pet Has Advantages…

October 4, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Events, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Adopting A Senior Pet Has Many Advantage For Families and Seniors

When Kathy Simko brought home her newly adopted dog, a 9-year-old Chesapeake Bay retriever named “Maggie,” she quickly discovered that her canine companion was full of pleasant surprises

“I asked my sister if she thought Maggie might enjoy going for a walk,” Simko recalls. “As soon as I said it, Maggie jumped up and began wagging her tail. She pranced across the kitchen, picked up her leash in her mouth and brought it to me. Not only did she love going for walks, but I found out she was perfectly leash trained. In fact, she was wonderfully trained in just about every way.” 

Many older dogs and cats are full of pleasant surprises like Maggie.They’re mature, well-mannered and eager to spend time around people. Those are but a few of the reasons why pet experts say a mature dog or cat is the ideal match for the person or family who craves companionship, but doesn’t have the time, energy or financial resources that a puppy or kitten requires. 

Behavior & Training   

The popular phrase “what you see is what you get” rings true for mature mutts and calm cats.  Their new Pet Parents know in advance how they get along with other pets and small children, not to mention whether they enjoy getting a bath, riding in the car and how they behave at the veterinarian’s office or groomer.  Because puppies and kittens don’t reach maturity until they’re about a year old (even 2 years in the case of some dog breeds), it can be difficult to predict how they’ll ultimately react to different stimuli or situations.  

“Older animals are fully grown and their true personalities are apparent,” says Ellen Clark, operations director for the Wisconsin Humane Society.  “There are few surprises with an older pet.”  

Even better, many older dogs and cats have already been housetrained and they’re beyond the destructive chewing and scratching stages, Clark says. As a result, their Pet Parents don’t need to invest in training classes, chew toys or puppy pads. Older dogs and cats also enjoy a good night’s sleep just as much as their Pet Parents. Unlike puppies and kittens, they don’t need comforting or a potty break at 3 a.m.  

“And, you can teach an old dog new tricks if you need to,” Clarksays. “They’re often easier to train because they are mellow and they can focus on you. They learn quickly.”  

Age-Appropriate   

Mature pets are a good choice for people young and old. Families with small children are wise to consider getting a grown dog or cat who’s already lived in a home with kids and is accustomed to a child’s running, squealing and rambunctious play. Some puppies and kittens are frightened by children and could react with aggressive behavior, such as nipping or scratching.  Puppies especially can become over-stimulated when playing with children and might accidentally bite or scratch. And, kittens and puppies have sharper claws and teeth which can result in a more serious injury.  

At the same time, research suggests that pets can improve senior citizens’ physical and emotional health. Older dogs that don’t need long walks or strenuous exercise and calm cats who prefer a quiet household, are a perfect match for older Pet Parents.  

Medical Matters  

Aprille Hollis, public information officer for Maricopa County Animal Control (MCACC) in Phoenix, says that some adopters shy away from mature dogs and cats because they wrongly assume that older pets will develop health problems.  

“A puppy or kitten can get sick or suffer medical problems just as easily as an older dog or cat.  Any pet can get sick or hurt at any age,” she says.  

Instead, Pet Parents are likely to discover that many of their new companion’s veterinary needs have already been taken care of by the previous owner or, in the case of shelter pets, by a shelter veterinarian.  For example, many older dogs and cats have already been spayed or neutered.  They’ve also already received the first series of vaccinations necessary to protect them from deadly diseases, such as parvovirus and distemper in dogs and feline leukemia in cats.  That means they’ll need only annual booster shots to stay healthy.  

Fewer Fees … or Free!  

Because older dogs and cats are more difficult to place than kittens and puppies, many shelters across the country reduce or waive their adoption fees. It’s not uncommon to see adoption fees for pets older than 5 or 6 years of age reduced by 25 to 50 percent vs. younger dogs, cats, kittens and puppies.  

“Our adoption fee for dogs and cats aged 5 years and older can be considerably lower because it’s harder to find homes for these pets.Everyone wants the puppies and kittens,” says MCACC’s Hollis. “For example, our puppies can range from $100 to $150, while the fee for an older can be $65.”  

At WHS, Clark adds, there is no fee to adopt a cat aged 1 year and older (adopters are still carefully pre-screened to ensure a safe and responsible match).  

“The cats are already spayed or neutered, fully vaccinated and implanted with an identification microchip,” she says.  “We found that our kittens are adopted very quickly, and by not charging a fee for the older cats, we can find them ‘forever homes’ much more quickly too.”   

Finding an Older Pet 

If getting an older pet makes sense, here are a few options for finding one: 

Check newspaper and Internet classified ads. You’ll find scores of family pets for sale or even “free to good home.”   

Looking for a particular breed of pet? Consult a breed-specific rescue organization. Many breed-rescue groups utilize a network of volunteer foster-care providers to care for homeless animals until they find a permanent home. 

Visit your local humane society or animal control facility. An estimated 6 to 8 million dogs and cats end up in U.S. shelters every year, but only half of them find homes. Many shelters now have links on their web sites so prospective adopters can see pictures of available pets before driving to the shelter. 

Looking to adopt an older pet? See pets for adoption in your zip code at adoptions.petsmart.com

Written by: Kimberly Noetzel / PetSmart Charities

Dogs
Permalink: http://justonemorepet.wordpress.com/2008/09/29/adopting-a-sen…ie-and-seniors/ 

September 29, 2008 Posted by | Animal Abandonement, Just One More Pet, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Quality Time With Your Companion Animal

Once again, a new school year has begun. With busier school and activity schedules, it’s also the time when pet parents may find themselves with less time to spend with their companion animals. Here are some easy tips for making the most of the time that you do have:

Set aside a few minutes in the morning to groom your dog or cat. While brushing or combing, talk about your upcoming day. If your pets don’t enjoy grooming, then just spend a few minutes petting them. Whatever your daily morning interaction, try to do it at the same time and in the same place. Your companion will find comfort in the regimen – and so will you!

If you have a dog, do something that he or she will enjoy after you return home from work, like a game of catch, hide-and-seek, or take a long walk. If you have cats, we recommend using fishing poles with dangling feathers – your cat will love the chase!

Incorporate teeth cleaning, ear cleaning and/or nail trimming into your new routine. Too often, these health necessities are viewed begrudgingly as chores. Commit to making this time as pleasurable as possible, like time at the spa. 

Massage is a wonderful way to connect with your companion animals. Check out one of the many pet massage books currently on the market to help you develop a technique. There is even evidence to suggest that massage can improve your pet’s health, and it will relax you, too.

Just remember – spending quality time with your companion animal can bring about dramatic changes in temperament, improving the bond you share with your pet and your overall quality of life.

Source:  Healthy Pet Net

September 27, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pets, Success Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shock Collars, Crate Training, And Needing To Control

Sharing a comment left on one of the pet sites I/we belong to…

Putting a shock collar on a dog is THE MOST OFFENSIVE, NASTY, HORRIBLE thing you can do to your ‘best friend’, or, as I think of my dogs, your child.  I am ashamed to say, that in trying to make my second marriage work, I let my ex put shock collars on my dogs to keep them off the sofa and loveseat.  It will haunt me for the rest of my life. 

My older dog, Joey, is very intellegent.  The first shock from the collar and he knew……..stay away from the living room furniture.  My younger Lab mix is not exceptionally smart…….has a HUGE heart and is loving and loyal, happy and exuberant, and is the most compassionate dog I have ever had.  She did not understand the shock collar.  She freeked out.  Cut her head on the glass coffee table and learned only after SEVERAL shocks that the furniture was off limits. 

Today, the sofa is THEIRS.  I get the recliner……because the sofa is always ‘full’ of my ‘sofa loafers’.  The ex went the way of the garbage… OUT ON THE STREET, where he belongs.   Shortly after I kicked the ‘dog hater’ to the curb, my son tested the shock collar on his arm………………….needless to say, he was suprised to find out that it’s not just a ‘little zap’……..IT HURTS………ALOT!!!  If you EVER think that this device is not a painful, torturing, frightening training device you are wrong…………don’t ever do it.  Your conscious wil come back to haunt you.

And I don’t feel much different about locking your dog in a cage either.  These creatures are your best friends.   Is this how you would want to be treated??  Perhaps it is time to watch the origianl Planet of the Apes, again?!?

So what if your house or yard isn’t perfect?  So what if your dog barks a bit.  So what if you have to clean up some messes and do a few repairs.  That is what parenting is all about.   And in general, they will actually be better if you don’t cofine them and shock them, but instead smother them with love!!

These ideas and methods like shock collars, crate training, etc etc were created by people, who probably shouldn’t have pets, for their own convenience or ease or because they live in areas not friendly to pets and animals.  How would you like to be shocked when you tried to speak out of turn or express yourself or have to sit in a tiny cage all without being able to relieve yourself… so someone who supposedly loves you has it easier or doesn’t need to clean up a mess??  Think about it, isn’t being home all day alone, especially in an apartment or condo punishment enough??  And, a little mess is good for the soul!!  

Just because it is done… or someone calling themselves an expert says it is okay… doesn’t make it so!!!

September 26, 2008 Posted by | Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Vote For Positive Change For California Farm Animals

California Animal Advocates,

When you go to the polls on November 4, don’t forget to vote in positive change for California’s farm animals! Proposition 2 is a landmark ballot initiative that combats some of the worst abuses in factory farming. If passed, it will end the practice of keeping veal calves, breeding pigs and laying hens in cages and crates so small that the animals cannot turn around.

This law will not only prevent cruelty to animals—it also will improve food safety and reduce the devastating environmental impact of factory farms.

What You Can Do
Please visit the ASPCA Advocacy Center to learn more about Proposition 2 and send a note to friends and family asking them to vote YES! on Prop 2.

Thank you for your support, California!

Here are two important ways you can get involved this week in the campaign to pass Prop 2:

Tune in to the Ellen DeGeneres Show tomorrow, September 26th — I’ll be talking with Ellen about Proposition 2, and how it will help millions of farm animals in California and across the country. Click here to see when the show will air where you live.  

And you can bet I’ll have my dancing shoes on…

Watch our new video to hear straight from the, ahem, pig’s mouth about how you can help farm animals.  

It’s a funny animation, with a tune I bet you’ll recognize, but don’t get me wrong — the heinous treatment of farm animals is no laughing matter. Watch this short movie, then be sure to share it with everyone you know.

Related posts:

September 26, 2008 Posted by | Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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