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Feathered dino may be world’s first bird

first-bird-reconstruction

Fox News: A birdlike dinosaur from the Middle/Late Jurassic of China could be the first of the bird group. (Masato Hattori)

The skeleton of a Jurassic dinosaur from China could also be the oldest known bird, scientists report.

The fossil of Aurornis xui was found last year in a museum at the Fossil and Geology Park in Yizhou, China, long after a farmer first dug it up in the Liaoning Province. The feathery specimen represents the most ancient of the avialans, the group that includes birds and their relatives since their split from nonavian dinosaurs.

The research also reconfirms the birdlike fossil Archaeopteryx as an avialan, a classification that was challenged by some recent research. [Avian Ancestors: Dinosaurs That Learned to Fly]

Not everyone agrees that the new specimen is strictly a bird. "In my opinion, it’s a bird," study author Pascal Godefroit, a paleontologist at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels, told Nature News. Even so, he added, "The differences between birds and [nonavian] dinosaurs are very thin."

"Traditionally, we have defined birds as things like Archaeopteryx and closer to things like modern birds," vertebrate paleontologist Luis Chiappe of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, who was not involved in the study, told LiveScience. "If you stick to the definition, this thing is not earliest known bird," Chiappe said, but that’s missing the point, he said. What matters, is that it’s a very interesting animal that "still helps us understand better the origin of birds," he said.

Aurornis xui was a feathered dinosaur that lived during the Middle Jurassic period about 150 million years ago, analysis shows. It was about 1.6 feet from beak tip to tail tip, and possessed small, sharp teeth and long forelimbs.

The creature probably couldn’t fly, Godefroit said, but may have used its wings to glide between trees. The fossil’s feathers aren’t well-preserved, but the hip bones and other features strongly suggest it was a relative of modern birds, he said.

The researchers assert that Aurornis displaces Archaeopteryx as the oldest avialan, placing Archaeopteryx further along in the avialan lineage. Since Archaeopteryx was a flying creature, its placement among avialans means dinosaurs would have only had to develop powered flight once during evolutionary history.

The new findings also classify another family of birdlike dinosaurs, known as Troodontidae, as a sister group to the avialans. This reshuffling of the bird-dinosaur family tree suggests birds and nonavian dinosaurs diverged in Asia during the Middle to Late Jurassic.

The findings are detailed in the May 30 issue of the journal Nature.

Copyright 2013 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

June 1, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Unusual Stories, Wild Animals | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Chinese poaching of rare mammal exposed by boating accident

Pangolin

Pangolins are long, lizard-like land mammals covered with scales, which make them look like pine cones when they roll themselves up for protection. (Jefri Tarigan / Associated Press / March 1, 2013)

By Barbara Demick – April 16, 2013, 7:22 a.m. – Los Angeles Times

A boating accident off the Philippines coast has exposed Chinese poaching of a protected species of scaly anteater, or pangolin, prized in traditional medicine.

A 500-ton Chinese fishing vessel, the Min Long Yu, crashed into a coral reef April 8. When the boat was inspected, authorities found more than 2,000 butchered pangolins rolled up and packed into 400 boxes. It is one of the largest hauls of the species, which is subject to an international trade ban.

Pangolins are long, lizard-like land mammals covered with scales, which make them look like pine cones when they roll themselves up for protection.

The meat of this strange animal is considered a delicacy in southern China, while the scales are thought to have medicinal properties to treat asthma and cancer and to induce lactation in new mothers.

Filipino authorities are holding 12 Chinese members of the ship’s crew on charges of poaching and attempted bribery, and they face further charges of damaging the coral reef, which is in a UNESCO-protected marine sanctuary, Tubbataha Reef. Earlier this year, a U.S. Navy ship got stuck on a coral reef in the same marine park and had to be dismantled.

The incident seems likely to add another element of contention between China and the Philippines, already in dispute over sovereignty of fishing waters.

"It is bad enough that these Chinese have illegally entered our seas, navigated without boat papers and crashed recklessly into a national marine park and World Heritage Site," Jose Maria Lorenzo Tan, the chief executive of World Wildlife Fund-Philippines, said in a statement. "However, it is simply deplorable that they appear to be posing as fishermen to trade in illegal wildlife.’ "

The environmental group said it wasn’t sure yet whether the pangolins came from Malaysia or the Philippines.

April 18, 2013 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Toxic Chicken Jerky Pet Treats Pulled from Store Shelves!

Pet Treats

Story at-a-glance
  • First, the good news. Nestle Purina PetCare and Del Monte have voluntarily recalled their chicken jerky pet treats imported from China. The brands removed from store shelves are Waggin’ Train and Canyon Creek Ranch brand dog treats, along with Milo’s Kitchen Chicken Jerky and Chicken Grillers home-style dog treats.
  • Now for the not-so-good news. The reason for the recall is a potential issue of unapproved antibiotic contamination supposedly unrelated to the problem with these very same treats that has resulted in thousands of sick, and hundreds of dead pets.
  • Interestingly, it was the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets (NYSDAM) that found the antibiotic residue in the treats. They used a new, highly sensitive test to analyze the products in response to growing consumer concerns.
  • So for now, the chicken jerky treats that may have been sickening or killing pets since 2007 are no longer on store shelves. Let’s hope if they do reappear, they will be safe for your pets.

By Dr. Becker:

In a truly spectacular coincidence, the very same brands of chicken jerky treats suspected of causing sickness and death in hundreds of dogs since 2007 have now been identified as being possibly contaminated with “unapproved” antibiotics. (Apparently the antibiotics are approved for use in China, where the treats are made, and in other countries, but not in the U.S.)

According to NBC News, right after the first of the year, the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets (NYSDAM) informed the FDA it had found trace amounts of residual poultry antibiotics in several lots of Waggin’ Train and Canyon Creek Ranch brand dog treats, as well as Milo’s Kitchen Chicken Jerky and Chicken Grillers home-style dog treats.

Treats Have Been Voluntarily Recalled

Fortunately for U.S. pet owners and potential future pet victims, it seems the suggestion of antibiotic contamination was enough to prompt Nestle Purina PetCare (makers of Waggin’ Train and Canyon Creek Ranch jerky treats) and the Del Monte Corp. (makers of Milo’s Kitchen products) to voluntarily pull their chicken jerky products from store shelves across the country.

The New York agriculture agency discovered very low levels of four drugs not approved for use in U.S. poultry, and one antibiotic that is approved for use, but for which quantities are strictly limited. The antibiotics found were sulfaclozine, tilmicosin, trimethoprim, enrofloxacin and sulfaquinoxaline.

The agency used new, highly sensitive technology to detect the presence of the antibiotics. The tests on the jerky treats were conducted in response to “growing consumer concerns.”

Whatever the reason, I’m extremely thankful NYSDAM took it upon themselves to run the tests. And while discovering antibiotic residue in food products is never “good news,” I’m grateful, in this case, something was found in those treats that caused them to be pulled off the market.

Treat Manufacturers and FDA Make Predictable Public Response

Needless to say, a spokesman for Nestle Purina says the issue with the antibiotics is in no way related to the issue with these very same chicken jerky treats that have allegedly sickened over 2,200 pets and killed well over 300.

The FDA also weighed in. From the agency’s January 9 CVM update:

Based on the FDA’s review of the NYSDAM results, there is no evidence that raises health concerns, and these results are highly unlikely to be related to the reports of illnesses FDA has received related to jerky pet treats. FDA commends Del Monte and Nestle-Purina for withdrawing these products from the market in response to this product quality issue. FDA also welcomes additional information about NYSDAM’s testing methodology, which is different and reportedly more sensitive than currently validated and approved regulatory methods.

As those of you who have been following this fiasco are aware, the FDA has conducted its own “extensive” testing and has to date been unable to find anything in the chicken jerky treats that would cause pet illness or death. Consequently, the agency maintains it is unable to take action to get the treats recalled, or even to effectively warn consumers of the potential for harm to their pets.

At Least for Now, Suspect Treats Are Off Store Shelves

It’s a small victory, but one that brings a sigh of relief. Tragically, for those pet owners who lost beloved companions, the recall does not help.

According to NBC news, a woman from New York whose 2 year-old pug died suddenly in 2011 after eating Waggin’ Train chicken jerky treats, said in a statement:

"How many lives could have been saved if, six years ago, when there was first doubt that the safety of our companions was compromised, the FDA and all manufacturers of imported chicken jerky had issued a precautionary recall until the toxin was found? How much pain and suffering could have been avoided if only they had met their moral obligation six years ago and did the job the taxpayers pay them to do?"

Related:

The Dangers of Genetically Modified Ingredients in Pet Food

Pet Jerky Death Toll Update: 360 dogs, 1 Cat According to FDA

A Raw Food KIBBLE?

When Raw Food is NOT the Right Food for Your Pet

Surprise, Surprise… the Best Food for Dogs Is Homemade Food

Free Homemade Dog Food Recipes

The Importance of Bones in Your Pet’s Diet

The Nutrient Your Pet Needs More of As They Age: Protein

Pancreatitis in Dogs

Good Diet and Advice for Dogs with Pancreatitis

“Holidays Are Great and Fun To Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods”

Gourmet Doggie Biscuits and Some Holiday Snacking Tips

Beef Verses Bison for Dogs – Variety is critical for your pet to receive the full spectrum of amino acids, essential fatty acids, trace minerals, vitamins and antioxidants necessary to thrive.

Fatty Acids May Improve Mobility In Osteoarthritic Dogs

Pets and Toxic Plants

Natural Pet Remedies For Everyday Problems

Allergies and Springtime Ailments in Pets

Do Vaccinations Affect the Health of our Pets?

How the Pet Food Industry Has Helped Create "Carnivore Metabolic Syndrome"

Now dogs Have a Food Truck of Their Own With Bow-Wow Chow

Dysbiosis: The Root Cause of Many Other Pet Health Problems

Cancer and Your Pet: Two Things to Avoid

Now dogs Have a Food Truck of Their Own With Bow-Wow Chow

The Nutrient Your Dog Needs More of As They Age: Protein – And Expecting Your Pet to Get It from Rendered Pet Food Is the Worst of the Worst of the Worst Options!

Pupcakes

Gourmet Doggie Biscuits and Some Holiday Snacking Tips

Beef Verses Bison for Dogs – Variety is critical for your pet to receive the full spectrum of amino acids, essential fatty acids, trace minerals, vitamins and antioxidants necessary to thrive.

Chicken Jerky Recipe for dogs

WHAT HUMAN FOODS ARE UNSAFE FOR PETS? (the 12 worst)–> chocolate, sugarless gum & artificial sweeteners, alcohol, yeast dough, grapes & raisins, Macadamia nuts, onions (bad for dogs and cats… but poison for cats), garlic (for cats), caffeine, fat trimmings and bones (bad for cats and limited fat and the right bones for dogs), raw eggs (for cats, but must be careful for dogs and humans), and milk.

Some of the best human foods for dogs: peanut butter (although peanuts and peanut butter can contain mold so could be bad for humans and dogs), cheese including cottage cheese (some some dogs can be prone to be lactose intolerant like people), yogurt, watermelon, honeydew and cantaloupe, blueberries, salmon, green beans, sweet potatoes, fresh raw carrots, pumpkin, and lean meat… cooked or raw.

Did You Know There are Two Kinds of Raw Pet Food on the Market?

Megacolon: A Terrible Outcome for Constipated Pets

Resources:

Not Fit for a Dog!: The Truth About Manufactured Dog and Cat Food

See Spot Live Longer – How to help your dog live a longer and healthier life!

Raw and Natural Nutrition for Dogs: The Definitive Guide to Homemade Meals

screen-shot-2012-09-19-at-11.49.12-am[1]

Keep your pets healthy and help extend their lives with:

StemPet and StemEquine – Stem Cell Enhancers for Pets

February 1, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, pet products, Pet Recipes, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Pet Jerky Death Toll Update: 360 dogs, 1 Cat According to FDA

You may recall that at the end of 2007, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned dog owners that they should be aware of a "potential association between development of illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky products also described as chicken tenders, strips or treats."

At the time the warning was issued, reports had come in citing that at least 95 dogs had become ill, possibly due to consumption of chicken jerky. However, after multiple tests the FDA was unable to identify any cause for the illnesses, so it is not surprising that (1) people kept feeding their dog’s chicken jerky and (2) more dogs got sick.

Three of pups who died…

 

Then, in November of 2011, the FDA issued yet another warning stating that there was a potential connection between dogs that were falling ill and chicken jerky that was being imported from China. (I reported on this back in December.) Common symptoms included:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea – with or without blood
  • Loss of appetite
  • Lethargy
  • Kidney failure (increased thirst and urination are typical)

Some dogs that have ingested chicken jerky and develop these symptoms have recovered. Others have not been so lucky. To date, more than 2,200 dogs have become ill. According to NBCNews.com, at least 360 dogs and one cat have reportedly died in the U.S. after eating chicken jerky pet treats made in China.

The FDA is still stumped as to the cause, but back in March, msnbc.com reported:

"A log of complaints collected from pet owners and veterinarians contains references to at least three popular brands of jerky treats that may be associated with kidney failure and other serious ailments, according to internal Food and Drug Administration documents obtained by msnbc.com."
Of 22 "Priority 1" cases listed by the FDA late last year, 13 cited Waggin’ Train or Canyon Creek Ranch jerky treats or tenders, both produced by Nestle Purina PetCare Co., the records show. Another three listed Milo’s Kitchen Home-style Dog Treats, produced by the Del Monte Corp. The rest listed single brands or no brand.

Priority 1 cases are those in which the animal is aged 11 or younger and medical records that document illness are available, an FDA spokeswoman said. In many cases, samples of the suspect treats also are collected

The FDA is encouraging anyone who has a sick dog that has eaten chicken jerky to lodge a complaint and send in a sample of the product the dog ingested. The more complaints and samples they receive the better their chances are of making the connection and preventing future illnesses and deaths.

Pet owners are rightly up in arms about the situation. Multiple petitions have been started to demand a ban, recall, and warning labels on chicken jerky treats imported from China. Concerned lawmakers are also getting involved and encouraging the FDA to release the results of 153 tests on chicken jerky treats that are still pending. Hopefully the increased pressure will lead to a resolution of this situation in the not too distant future.
In the meantime, the FDA released a statement on September 14, 2012 which was a summary of the pet death reports. It linked the jerky treat-related deaths of the past 18 months and suggested owners avoid the products completely, saying they were unnecessary for a balanced diet. The FDA will also begin testing treats to find out whether irradiation of the products may be a contributing factor to illness and death.

Dr. Jennifer Coates

Chicken Jerky Update originally appeared on petMD.com  – Cross Posted by Paw Nation

Homemade Chicken Jerky Recipe for Dogs (Pets)

chicken jerky

Yummy super-simple treat… and it’s also super-popular with dogs and healthy. Chicken Jerky is a Treat made from thin strips of chicken slow baked to almost the point of crispness.

Ingredients

1 pound chicken breasts (I baked three pounds!)

Start by preheating your oven to 170 or 180 degrees, depending on how low your oven will go. While that’s preheating, assemble the chicken. I used frozen chicken breast tenderloins (this is a great way to use any chicken you’ve got that’s become freezer burned!)

I had thawed the frozen chicken breasts by putting them in the refrigerator overnight…and woke up to find they were still frozen! I put the chicken in a big bowl of cold water for about 15 minutes which thawed it enough to slice with a sharp knife. TIP: It’s easier to slice the chicken when it’s semi-frozen rather than completely thawed; you can use the heel of your hand on the knife to “chop” the slices rather than trying to saw through thawed meat.

The only difficult part of this dog treat recipe is the slicing; you’ll want to slice the chicken no more than about 1/4 inch wide. Slice with the grain of the chicken, rather than against it; this will make the treats a little chewier and make them last a LITTLE bit longer when you give them to your dogs.

Slice up the chicken and place it on a greased cookie sheet; be sure to use one with a slight edge because there will be water and juices from the chicken during the first hour of cooking. Leave about a 1/2 inch or so between slices and just make sure they’re not touching.

Once you’re finished slicing, pop the cookie sheets in the oven and bake for two hours. After two hours, check the slices and see if they’re dry. You don’t want them to be crispy to the point of snapping but you do want them to be very chewy. (They should look like a very done french fry.) Because I baked three pounds of chicken at once, I had to bake my treats for an 90 minutes and I flipped the slices with a spatula after two hours of baking.

When they’re done, remove the treats from the oven and cool on a drying rack. If you don’t have one (I don’t), just flip a dish drainer over and drape with a dish towel then put your treats on the towel to dry. (You just want to get the treats up off the metal cookie sheets so they’ll cool crispier. A wicker basket flipped over and draped with a cup towel work work great, too.)

When the treats are completely cool, bag them in zippered bags or pop them in an airtight container and refrigerate. You can also freeze the treats for several months. Be warned, though: these are VERY popular treats…they’ll go fast! (Cats also love them!)

Related:

A Raw Food KIBBLE?

When Raw Food is NOT the Right Food for Your Pet

Surprise, Surprise… the Best Food for Dogs Is Homemade Food

Free Homemade Dog Food Recipes

The Importance of Bones in Your Pet’s Diet

The Nutrient Your Pet Needs More of As They Age: Protein

Pancreatitis in Dogs

Good Diet and Advice for Dogs with Pancreatitis

“Holidays Are Great and Fun To Share With Our Pets, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods”

Gourmet Doggie Biscuits and Some Holiday Snacking Tips

Beef Verses Bison for Dogs – Variety is critical for your pet to receive the full spectrum of amino acids, essential fatty acids, trace minerals, vitamins and antioxidants necessary to thrive.

Fatty Acids May Improve Mobility In Osteoarthritic Dogs

Pets and Toxic Plants

Natural Pet Remedies For Everyday Problems

Allergies and Springtime Ailments in Pets

Do Vaccinations Affect the Health of our Pets?

How the Pet Food Industry Has Helped Create "Carnivore Metabolic Syndrome"

Now dogs Have a Food Truck of Their Own With Bow-Wow Chow

Dysbiosis: The Root Cause of Many Other Pet Health Problems

Cancer and Your Pet: Two Things to Avoid

Now dogs Have a Food Truck of Their Own With Bow-Wow Chow

The Nutrient Your Dog Needs More of As They Age: Protein – And Expecting Your Pet to Get It from Rendered Pet Food Is the Worst of the Worst of the Worst Options!

Pupcakes

Gourmet Doggie Biscuits and Some Holiday Snacking Tips

Beef Verses Bison for Dogs – Variety is critical for your pet to receive the full spectrum of amino acids, essential fatty acids, trace minerals, vitamins and antioxidants necessary to thrive.

Chicken Jerky Recipe for dogs

WHAT HUMAN FOODS ARE UNSAFE FOR PETS? (the 12 worst)–> chocolate, sugarless gum & artificial sweeteners, alcohol, yeast dough, grapes & raisins, Macadamia nuts, onions (bad for dogs and cats… but poison for cats), garlic (for cats), caffeine, fat trimmings and bones (bad for cats and limited fat and the right bones for dogs), raw eggs (for cats, but must be careful for dogs and humans), and milk.

Some of the best human foods for dogs:  peanut butter (although peanuts and peanut butter can contain mold so could be bad for humans and dogs), cheese including cottage cheese (some some dogs can be prone to be lactose intolerant like people), yogurt, watermelon, honeydew and cantaloupe, blueberries, salmon, green beans, sweet potatoes, fresh raw carrots, pumpkin, and lean meat… cooked or raw.

Resources:

Not Fit for a Dog!: The Truth About Manufactured Dog and Cat Food

See Spot Live Longer – How to help your dog live a longer and healthier life!

Raw and Natural Nutrition for Dogs: The Definitive Guide to Homemade Meals

screen-shot-2012-09-19-at-11.49.12-am[1]

September 22, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Dogs, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Awesome Dog Guards Owner’s Bike

Awesome Dog Guards Owner's Bike

  • A golden retriever has become something of a local celebrity in China for his habit of guarding his owner’s bicycle. Luo Wencong does not need to buy a bike lock as his dog, Li Li, keeps such a close eye on bicycle. Li Li is so clever that he can also count, carry baskets of shopping and take out the rubbish. The best part of the video is at the end when Li Li climbs up on the bike and lets his Luo know he’s ready to go by barking!

Video:  Awesome Dog Guards Owner’s Bike

I think what makes this even more amazing is that many Chinese still eat dogs and cats after seeing how smart, loving and loyal they can be!

May 4, 2012 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , | Leave a comment

First The Greenies Want Us to Eat Our Dogs… Now the Academics Say It Is Insulting to Call Them Pets

ACADEMICS: CALLING ANIMALS ‘PETS’ IS INSULTING

Last week for Earth Day the Disciples of Global Warming re-cycled their campaign to Eat the Family Pet to reduce our carbon footprint.

Domestic dogs, cats, hamsters or budgerigars [birds] should be rebranded as “companion animals” while owners should be known as “human carers”, they insist.  Even terms such as wildlife are dismissed as insulting to the animals concerned – who should instead be known as “free-living”, the academics including an Oxford professor suggest.

The call comes from the editors of then Journal of Animal Ethics, a new academic publication devoted to the issue. …

In its first editorial, the journal – jointly published by Prof Linzey’s centre and the University of Illinois in the US – condemns the use of terms such as ”critters” and “beasts”.  It argues that “derogatory” language about animals can affect the way that they are treated.

“Despite its prevalence, ‘pets’ is surely a derogatory term both of the animals concerned and their human carers,” the editorial claims.  “Again the word ‘owners’, whilst technically correct in law, harks back to a previous age when animals were regarded as just that: property, machines or things to use without moral constraint.”

It goes on: “We invite authors to use the words ‘free-living’, ‘free-ranging’ or ‘free-roaming’ rather than ‘wild animals’

“For most, ‘wildness’ is synonymous with uncivilized, unrestrained, barbarous existence.

“There is an obvious prejudgment here that should be avoided.”  [h/t WeaselZippers / the Blaze]

Personally I prefer to think of my pets as ‘furkids’ and part of the family to love, not as property.  They add much more to my life than the so-called care-giving I do for them could be counted as a burden.  I don’t mind doing for them as I don’t for any family member and believe they deserve fair treatment and love.  As of insulting them if they are called pets… doubt they’d notice. But as for eating them or euthanizing them for global warming… not a chance!

Perhaps these academics might want to put themselves to work fighting some of the real anti-pet, anti-animal, animal cruelty issues??  What a concept.  Here are a few if they can’t find any:

The Latest Enemies of Iran: Dogs and Their Owners

No Mercy:  Calf Farm Cruelty Exposed

Greenies Gone Wild Again… for Earth Day  -  Back to Americans Doing More, Including Eating Our Dogs

China, Korea and many other nations are still eating dogs and cats:

STOP KILLING DOGS! 2 Million Dogs Killed in Horrible Ways Every Year in South Korea

Olympic Clean-up Chinese Style:  Beijing’s Shocking Cat Death Camps

And how about the fact that we in the United States we are Still Euthanizing 4 Million Dogs Plus Additional Pets in Shelters in America Every Year because of don’t have a good system. We base rules on lobbies or making money and we restrict people in far too many communities to one or two pets.  No one is promoting hoarding, but 3 to 6 pets are the right number for some people, one is too many for others and abuses need to be addressed on an individual bases.  We also allow vets to over-charge for spay and neutering procedures and demonize private breeders and people who choose to let their pet have a litter but too often look the other way when it comes to puppy and kitten mills and the pet stores who buy and sell the the ‘mill’s animals.  Join the “NO KILL Movement” and report all abuse and neglect, against animals and humans.

Related:

UN Document: Mother Earth Has Same Rights as Humans

Protect Innocent Animals; Make Bestiality a Felony

Gov’t to Decide What Pets You Can Own

April 30, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, free range rescue, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Owner's Rights, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures, Wild Animals | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Living the life of Riley in fast lane – Wiener Nationals

Article Tab : Olympic medalist Brittany Hayes and her wiener dog, Riley, will be vying for another title Saturday at Los Alamitos Race Course.HUNTINGTON BEACH The last time I talked to Brittany Hayes we were in China, at the world’s grandest sporting event, discussing the possibility of being a champion, an Olympic champion.

Now, I’m talking to Hayes here, at a nearly empty park, but still discussing the possibility of a champion, one who stands 10 inches high and weighs 12 pounds.

And, in mid-question, someone’s dog jumps on my lap.

This rarely happens at Lakers practice, although no one is ever sure what’s coming next from Ron Artest.

“I’m an Olympian,” Hayes says, “and my dog is more famous than me.”

In recent days, I’ve written about Phil Jackson, Mike Scioscia and Vladimir Guerrero. Generally, whomever I write about is a big dog.

Today, I’m writing about a wiener dog.

But, no, not just any wiener dog. This wiener dog is one of the fastest wiener dogs around.

Hey, I do have standards and Riley does measure up, even if he’s so short he could limbo under a bathroom rug.

He already has won the Octoberfest event at Old World Village in Huntington Beach and the wiener dog races that are part of Long Beach State’s homecoming. When your school doesn’t have a football team, apparently you improvise.

Riley next will be going after the Wienerschnitzel Wiener Nationals on Saturday at Los Alamitos Race Course. The event mostly is for charity — benefitting the Seal Beach Animal Care Center — and for laughs.

But something quite significant also waits at the finish line — $1,000. That goes to the dog’s owner.

And the dog house in the shape of a Wienerschnitzel restaurant? That goes to the winning wiener.

What sets Riley apart — besides being Usain Bolt in a teeny chocolate-and-tan fur coat — is that his owner possesses an Olympic medal. Hayes, who played at Foothill High and USC, won silver with the U.S. women’s water polo team in 2008 in Beijing.

Now, she’s on dry land chasing another valued piece of sports hardware: a trophy inscribed with the words “Fastest Wiener in the West.”

So it’s not exactly “Faster, Higher, Stronger,” but let’s see Michael Phelps race on all fours against opponents with names like Killer, Dude and Snuggles.

“I am competitive, of course,” Hayes says. “But Riley just loves to race. He’s a natural. People might think I’m a crazy dog lady. Well, I am a crazy dog lady but not one who goes crazy if my dog doesn’t win.”

When USA Water Polo wanted to do a story — complete with video — on Riley, Hayes was worried about what other people might think.

No one wants to be viewed as having the stability and perspective of a person who potentially one day could live alone with, say, 27 cats.

Well, Hayes isn’t that person. She has a boyfriend, Stefan Luedecke, and lives in a condo. The only hint of insanity is her desire to be an attorney; she just finished her first year at Loyola Law School.

But, be very certain, she does love her wiener dog.

“He’s our child,” Hayes says. “Everything revolves around him. He goes everywhere with us.”

Riley has been inside restaurants, hidden in a beach bag. He has gone grocery shopping. When she coaches, Hayes sometimes takes Riley to the pool, where he’ll sit in a bag with his head popping out.

He has a nice life, in part because he almost died before any of this racing business even began. Riley, who turns 2 in a couple weeks, was sick with bad allergies for five months.

There were times when Hayes had to hand-feed him baby food and carry him out to go to the bathroom, holding him up so he could do his business.

On this day, Riley appears completely healthy, and he sounds that way, too. The little guy enjoys a good bark.

“We say he has a split personality,” Hayes says. “He’s half Riley and half Chucky. He’ll yell at you for five minutes, and then he’ll be kissing you.”

Funny, Scioscia’s the same way.

But Riley is cuter. Scioscia wasn’t the one who dressed up like a fireman for Halloween and received 20,000 votes in an online costume contest.

“It’s really like he’s a human being sometimes,” Hayes says of Riley, not Scioscia. “It kind of scares us.”

On Saturday, Riley will attempt to let his legs do the barking. He will be trying to become a champion, trying to rise above the designation of mere wiener.

This isn’t the Olympics. This is bigger.

At the Games, first place means you get a spot on the top step. At the Wiener Nationals, first place means you get the whole house.

Source:  OC Register

O.C. Olympian Now Eyeing Wiener’s Circle

Nathan’s Annual Independence Day Hot Dog Eating Contest

Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest 2010

New York, Boston and Washington are cities warming up crowds with entertainment events during the day, putting up traditional fireworks displays. And what Big Apple Fourth of July would be complete without Coney Island’s embrace of two of America’s biggest loves: hot dogs and competition or Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest (2010).

Nathan’s International Hot Dog Eating Contest July Fourth is an annual competitive eating competition held at Nathan’s Famous Corporation’s original and best-known restaurant at the corner of Surf and Stillwell Avenues in Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York.

The event is held on July 4 and is regarded as the world’s most famous hot dog eating contest and a colorful tradition of Independence Day in the United States. In 2006, over 30,000 spectators attended the event, and an additional 1.5 million households watched it live on ESPN.

Three time defending champion Joey Chestnut faced off with his competition, and when all was said and done, Chestnut emerged victorious again capturing the title for 2010. The contest festivities started on Sunday, July 4 at noon. The contest has become a 4th of July tradition.

Kobayashigettyimages_crop_310x205

2010 winner ate 54 wieners and buns

Other cities around the country hold local versions of the contest.

Here are a few local audience photos of attendees ;-)

weiner-dog-pup-sand

Small Bite

Too Much Fun

No Wiener Dogs Were Harmed…

July 5, 2010 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, pet fun, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Stop Killing Dogs Campaign – Please Join US

Stop Killing Dogs - Stop Dog Farms Become a  “Stop Killing Dogs” campaign supporter!

Thank you for caring about this issue. In case you haven’t read the recent news about the dog meat industry, here’s an example from Korea:

A high school student contacted KARA (Korea Animal Rights Advocates) about a dog farm next to his school. Students can see the dog farm, hear dogs barking all day, and hear louder cries once every 3 days (most likely when the slaughtering of dogs is taking place). An awful smell reaches the school playground from the dog farm.

You can read the whole story and see pictures by following this link: http://animalrightskorea.org/actions/dog-farm-near-high-school.html

This is only one example of the abuse of animals out of hundreds of cases: dogs of different breeds are kept on farms across Korea in horrible conditions, without proper food or clean water and in filthy steel cages. KARA has reported this farm to the officials. The farmer can be penalized if he does not have a permit for his dog farm.

You can help in several ways to change the status quo:

*Share the petition page with your friends and upload this photo (http://twitpic.com/s0bpw) into your online photo albums and blogs or as a profile picture.

*Download and distribute flyers to people in your local community. Get them at: http://www.uniteddogs.com/stopkillingdogs/get-involved

*Join Stop Killing Dogs support page on Facebook to keep yourself updated with the latest news: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Stop-Killing-Dogs-supporters-page/235848430651

KARA and other organizations are fighting for a better life for dogs in Korea every day. But we need more than local efforts to ensure proper legal protection for these animals and make dog farms illegal. The government of Korea tries to ignore the problem, so to help Korean dogs we need international pressure.

The petition at www.uniteddogs.com/stopkillingdogs has already collected over 350,000 signatures.

If all of you find 1 person to sign, there will be 700,000 signatures by tomorrow.

Thank you for spreading the word,

United Dogs and Cats

Posted:  Just One More Pet

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February 6, 2010 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | 3 Comments

Chinese University targets cats in H1N1 fear : report

MORE CAT HATE-China is now going to do mass killings of cats because they believe they will catch H1N1. You talk about INSANE. Maybe the Chinese government should start killing off their own people because HUMANS carry H1N1 – NOT CATS. I HATE CHINA!

A sophomore from Beihang University is quarantined at the university hospital. A freshman died from H1N1 at the university last week.

A famous technology university in Beijing is alleged to be ridding its campus of homeless cats because of fears the animals will pass A(H1N1) to students.

“I was informed by a security guard in this university they will clean up approximately 50 abandoned cats in the campus, starting on Wednesday,” a student surnamed Kui from the Beijing University of Technology (BUT), who looked after the cats, said.

“The security guard told me the decision was made at a university presidential meeting, but they refused to tell me how they would get rid of them,” he said.

This appears to support a report by the Beijing News on Saturday, in which a security guard said the plan was genuine.

However, security guards and the university’s administration department denied the existence of such a plan when contacted by METRO yesterday.

Despite the denial, a cat shelter was set on fire by a cigarette on Saturday, one day after the decision was reportedly made.

Three cats escaped but were now in serious danger from exposure to the freezing weather, Kui said.

More than 700 freshmen at Beihang University were infected with H1N1 at a military training camp last week. A male student later died.

Kui said his university was concerned about the situation at Beihang University and was trying to take action, which included getting rid of homeless cats.

After learning of the plan, a retired professor surnamed Xu from BUT told METRO she approached the security office and asked them how they would remove the cats. She was told they would first try to find people to adopt them, and would leave those remaining in a field on the outskirts of Beijing.

“I am afraid some cats will be hurt or even killed,” Xu said.

Qin Xiaona, president of the Capital Animal Welfare Association, a charity organization established in 1997, said cats who have undergone sterilization operations and vaccinations are not harmful to people.

According to Kui, nearly 80 percent of the cats in BUT have had sterilization operations. Those who hadn’t been sterilized were either too young to have the operation or too old to be fall pregnant. Students and teachers covered all the costs of the operations.

“I spent almost 300 yuan ($44) a month to feed them and I know of another retired professor who spent 1,000 yuan recently to have three cats sterilized,” Xu said.

“There is not a single medical expert or research to suggest any connection between the H1N1 virus transmission and cats. Furthermore, the university didn’t spend a penny on them and the cats don’t cause any trouble. I don’t understand why they want to get rid of them,” Xu said.

Xu is now contacting kindly people and animal shelters to see whether they can adopt the cats. The Capital Animal Welfare Association is also involved.

“Adopting abandoned cats is not really encouraged because it promotes other cat abandoners to follow suit,” Qin said.

“The best way to protect abandoned cats is find responsible people to take care of them, let them stay where they are, and give them sterilizing operations and vaccinations,” Qin added.

Qin told METRO she would contact BUT and try to convince them to keep the cats.

In February, a group of male students from BUT angered netizens when they stamped on an abandoned cat and left it in a dormitory lobby until it died to days later.

China Daily – Updated: 2009-11-02 10:45

Dog Meat in Beijing Ordered Off Menus for Olympics

Olympic Clean-up Chinese Style:  Beijing’s Shocking Cat Death Camps

No Dog Slaughters: End China Dog Culls

Please Sign Petition: Boycott China to Stop Mass Killing of Animals – The Petition Site

Posted:  Just One More Pet

November 3, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences | , , , , | Leave a comment

No Dog Slaughters: End China Dog Culls

The first draft of national animal welfare legislation for China is under review; if passed into law, it would permanently ban the cruel practice of dog “culls” (indiscriminate slaughter of dogs) to control rabies. Join the international community in urging China to adopt more humane methods of rabies control. Sign the petition today.

Help prevent cruelty to animals in China. Take action!

No Dog Slaughters: End China Dog CullsInstead of modern humane methods of rabies prevention, government officials in China often resort to mass slaughters of dogs, called culls, in which dog-beating squads kill any dog spotted on the street, even if it has an owner. The first draft of national animal welfare legislation for China is under review; if passed into law, it would permanently ban these cruel dog culls.

Help prevent cruelty to animals in China – sign the petition below and tell a friend.

Sponsored by: IFAW

Posted: Just One More Pet

October 28, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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