JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Friends Do Not Make Friends Wait in Hot Cars

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Don’t think for a minute that dogs can survive in a hot car

K-9 dies after being left in hot patrol car 

It Is So Hot Here… My Dog Is Melting!! ;-)

Car Sickness & Fear of Riding in Cars

June 7, 2014 Posted by | Animal Related Education, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Outreach for Pets, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Face of Dogfighting: One Dog’s Incredible Journey

Video: The Face of Dogfighting: One Dog’s Incredible Journey

November 4, 2013 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Dog(s) Survive 4th of July Prank

NBCLA/THITW: A 2-year-old pit bull pup who may have been the victim of a cruel Fourth of July prank was rescued July 5th, but it’s just the start of what likely will be a long recovery for the badly burned dog.  The young pit bull was found July 5 in the Van Nuys, Calif., area and brought to the East Valley Animal Shelter.

While rescuers are unsure exactly what happened to the dog they named Indy, they suspect he may have been hurt by fireworks the day before.

Shelter Transport Animal Rescue Team (S.T.A.R.T.) took the dog into their care Thursday. The group, which describes its purpose as removing animals from high-kill shelters in Los Angeles, is offering a $1,000 reward for the arrest and conviction of whoever injured Indy.

"We named him Indy because we want Independence Day to mark his freedom from those who hurt him," according to a video posted to S.T.A.R.T.’s Facebook page.

In the video, Indy takes ginger steps around his cage. He is suffering from third-degree burns over half his body, including on his stomach, legs and paws.

Doctor Aids Pup Hurt by Fireworks

Dr. Daniel Slaton, a well-known surgeon who typically operates on humans, was called in after the pit bull was apparently strapped with fireworks and lit ablaze.  He believes based on the pattern and location of the burns, the dog was strapped with fireworks on July 4.

“Fire from the fireworks are going down his legs, and as it was being lit, he was walking and burning the bottoms of his feet,” said Slaton, lead surgeon at the Westlake Village Animal Hospital, where Indy has undergone at least 2 surgeries so far.

Called "sweet and gentle" by rescuers, the 2 to 3-year-old pup (pictured above) is being treated by a burn specialist at the private veterinarian hospital, where he’ll have to stay at least another month.

His next surgery is scheduled for Friday morning.

Rescuers are asking for the public’s help to fund Indy’s extensive recovery.

Anyone interested in donating is asked to contact donations@startrescue.org, or mail a check to:

S.T.A.R.T.
PO Box 4792
Valley Village, CA 91617

The organization notes that donations should be sent as "Personal and Gift so no charges are taken out, and kindly write INDY in the memo."

See video HERE

Related: 

‘Rocket’ the dog lucky to be alive after thugs attached an explosive to its neck and blew it up 

Justice for Dog Whose Face Was Blown Off By Fireworks!

July 17, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Dog rescued after being tied to train tracks by ‘confused’ man

Rescued Banjo

Rescued Banjo

Were it not for an eagle-eyed engineer, the world would be minus this very lucky dog. Earlier this month, an engineer driving a Union Pacific train through Mecca, Calif., saw a man stepping away from something he’d left behind: a 10-month-old doggy, tied to the tracks. The emergency braking system stopped the train, and Union Pacific Special Agent Sal Pina arrested the man, 78, who reportedly said his family did not want the dog. Pina said animal-cruelty charges wouldn’t be filed, as the man appeared to be confused or unaware of what he’d done. The rescued pup, who animal services worker named Banjo — slang for old railroad traffic signs — is happy, healthy and looking for a new home.

This ended up being a success story, but it could have been a horror story.  Sadly the numbers of elderly suffering from dementia and Alzheimer’s as well as other people suffering from mental and emotional disorders are at an all time high, let alone the people who are innately cruel and animal abusers, plus the clueless who are just abandoning their animals because of monetary problems.  Be vigilant and intercede, report abuse and keep an eye on friends and family members experiencing mental, emotional or financial challenges.  Pets and children often become unintentional victims!!

Pets are fabulous companions for the elderly and those suffering from various illnesses and challenges and pet therapy has become very popular and useful treatment , but we must remember that those animals, who give their love and companionship selflessly, are God’s creatures as well and deserve love and compassion in return.

Cross-Posted at True Health Is True Wealth

Related:

Alzheimer’s patients follow different paths to a final debilitation

Pets Being Left Behind to Starve by Their Families

Pet Therapy

April 10, 2013 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , | 1 Comment

North Dakota voters reject animal cruelty law

Voters struck down a law to make animal cruelty a felony

Voters struck down a law to make animal cruelty a felony

One of the weakest states for anti-cruelty laws is North Dakota, and unfortunately, it appears that it will stay that way for the time being.

Despite an effort to change the status quo in North Dakota, on Tuesday, voters defeated a measure which would have made animal cruelty a felony.

Specifically, the measure would have made it a class C felony “to maliciously and intentionally harm a living dog, cat or horse.”

According to Wednesday’s Associated Press, had the measure passed, individuals convicted of animal cruelty would have faced up to five years in prison and fines of $5,000.

Efforts to defeat the proposed law were headed up by two sizable farm groups in the state who claimed that the law was "poorly worded and vague."

November 9, 2012 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | 2 Comments

Lab crew indicted on animal cruelty charges

By RENEE ELDER  -  Associated Press  -  Posted: Thursday, Jul. 07, 2011

RALEIGH, N.C. Four former workers at a North Carolina testing lab have been indicted on felony animal cruelty charges, following an animal rights group’s undercover investigation that captured video images of animals being hit, kicked and thrown, officials said Wednesday.

Gates County District Attorney Frank Parrish said Christine Clement and Tracy Small were indicted on two counts each of cruelty to animals, while Jessica Detty and Mary Ramsey were each indicted on five counts of the same charge. Parrish said the grand jury handed down the indictments Tuesday.

In North Carolina, the sentence for a person with no previous criminal record could range from as little as three months of community service to 14 months in prison.

The charges follow the September 2010 release of a videotape provided by an undercover worker for the group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

Detty said Wednesday that she was not aware of the indictment, nor had she heard from the other three defendants in the case. She told The Associated Press that she wouldn’t mistreat animals.

"Wow. I don’t see myself as a type of person to ever do something like that and I would not ever," said Detty, who said she was a receptionist at the lab for a year and a half. "If I were to go to court, I would surely have a lawyer to defend me that I was not in the wrong," Detty said.

Messages left for the other three workers were not immediately returned Wednesday.

PETA lab investigator Kathy Guillermo called it a groundbreaking case for animal rights.

She said it is the first case she is aware of in which research lab workers have been charged with animal cruelty.

"There are unspeakable things happening to animals in labs every day, but when you also strike them, kick them or withhold health care, it’s animal cruelty,’ Guillermo said.

The video shot by a PETA member working at the lab shows workers throwing a cat, pulling a dog’s teeth with inadequate pain medication and trying to pull a cat’s claws off by jerking it from a wire cage.

Professional Laboratory and Research Services Inc. was closed in late 2010 after the USDA received PETA’s report and began to investigate the operation.

Guillermo said the lab was not affiliated with any specific company but would carry out testing for manufacturers of pet products, such as flea and tick medications.

More than 200 dogs and 50 cats were confiscated from the lab by the USDA following the investigation.

The lab’s owner, Helen Sonenshine, of Virginia, did not return a call from a reporter Wednesday.

Connie Detty, the mother of Jessica Detty, said her daughter was an animal lover who often brought rabbits home from the lab to keep them from being euthanized.

Gates County is on the North Carolina-Virginia line, about 114 miles northeast of Raleigh.

Associated Press writer Emery Dalesio contributed to this report.

Source:  Charlotte Observer

July 9, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Public Service Announcement —– Do not leave your dog unattended ever!

Do not leave your dog… your pets outside or in vehicles in this heat ever!!!

In light of reading multiple reports of dogs dying (slowly cooked from the inside out) by being left unattended in cars here is a public service announcements for all you mentally challenged and cruel morons… DON’T TAKE YOUR DOG (OR ANY OTHER LIVING CREATURE) WITH YOU IF YOU DON’T INTEND TO STAY RIGHT WITH YOUR DOG.

I don’t even let my dog outside in our big fenced in yard without supervising her, just exactly like you would a toddler.

What is it with people that bring their dogs along in a car and leave them? Are they nuts or just plain mean.

Dogs will even die if left outside too long in the heat God, don’t get a dog or kitty if you’re not going to care for him/her… they are not it’s; they are living beings.

 

 

The body temperature of the animal will increase to the point where it is effectively boiled alive from the inside  – Ch Supt Mike Flynn

Again, god how stupid are people? In just three minutes of googling I’ve seen over a hundred cases of dogs being left to die in the heat………..what in sam hell is going on with humanity?  What happened to common sense and love for our pets?

Don’t just leave your dog, watch them, they are about as intelligent as a two year old child at most – when my kids were two I had to be on them like glue).

I don’t leave my dog alone ever, I know exactly where she is at and what she is doing at all times.

Don’t get a dog if you’re not going to take really good care of him/her.
Boiling to death is a horrible, gruesome way to die.

Video:  Idiots Leave Dogs Unattended in Heat Wave

Source: ATS

Make sure there is plenty of cool water out for them in the house and outside in the shade.

Related:

Cruelty Alert: Pets Suffering from Heatstroke in Parked Cars

Temperatures Are Rising: Be a Dog Defender: Help Save Animals This Summer!  Cool Ideas for Hot Dogs -  Please be proactive and vocal… you could be saving a life and definitely saving animals of a lot of suffering!!

ASPCA’s Pets in Hot Cars flyer (pdf) in her glovebox to give out when appropriate. Please print and distribute these flyers (pdf) in your neighborhood to help educate people about the danger of leaving pets in hot cars.

A hot oven or a hot car... It's the same thing.

Please step up for abused and neglected pets and animals.  Help them and be their voice.  Call the authorities if you suspect a problem.  It is always better to err on the pet’s or animal’s (or child’s) side!  And always call animal services or the police if you see a pet locked in a car and/or out in a yard where it has no access to shade and water!  More animals die from ignorant, neglectful and cruel owners than from diseases!!

Posted by Ask Marion at JOMP – h/t to Jean Stoner

‘Dogs Have The Intelligence of a Human Toddler’

June 29, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Undercover humane investigations to be banned in Minnesota?

April 7, 2011- Two bills have been introduced in the Minnesota Legislature that would make it a crime to videotape and to show footage shot inside puppy and kitten mills and factory farms.

Senate File 1118 and House File 1369 would criminalize blowing the whistle on animal cruelty, food safety problems, or labor abuses inside puppy and kitten mills or factory farms by making it a crime to take video inside such facilities, or even for the news media to possess or distribute these images. Read the bills here.

Please take action to oppose these bills today.

While purporting to be targeted at actual interference or damage to farming operations, SF 1118/HF 1369 are worded so broadly that they criminalize videotaping or audio recording of activities inside ‘animal facilities’. An ‘animal facility’ includes farming operations, research facilities, veterinary offices, pounds or shelters, pet stores, and commercial kennels. These bills prohibit ‘animal facility tampering’ (which is already prohibited by state and federal law), ‘animal facility interference’ (defined, in part, as video or audio taping inside a facility without the owner’s consent, and possessing or distributing such videos), and ‘animal facility fraud’ (using false pretenses to gain employment at a facility). Some of the provisions in the bills, such as theft, trespass, and fraud are already crimes under existing law. In addition, the chilling effect  this proposed legislation will have, if passed, is detrimental to the public interest in knowing about abuses of animals and consumer product safety violations. The bills also define all equine species, including horses, ponies, mules, jennys, donkeys, and hinnies, as ‘agricultural animals’. Once defined as such, they may not receive the greater protections afforded to ‘companion animals’ under Minnesota’s cruelty statutes.

The bills prohibit usage of one of the most important tools the humane movement has to reduce and prevent animal suffering- undercover investigations that expose animal cruelty and inhumane conditions and practices that go on behind closed doors in Minnesota.

If these bills pass into law, taking undercover footage in Minnesota’s puppy mills, like that captured at Kathy Bauck’s facility by Companion Animal Protection Society, would be a criminal offense, as would taking undercover footage at Minnesota’s slaughter and factory farming facilities, like that taken by the Humane Society of the United States at the Willmar poultry processing facility. Both such videos revealed shockingly inhumane conditions and practices, and in the case of Bauck, led to her conviction for animal torture.  Similar legislation has been introduced in Iowa and Florida, following undercover investigations that revealed inhumane conditions and animal suffering there.

Undercover investigations protect the public

The public has an interest in knowing about consumer product safety violations. In states around the country, undercover investigations at farming and slaughter operations have revealed animal husbandry practices and conditions that threaten the safety of the food supply. In California, an undercover investigation there led to the the nation’s largest beef recall in history. In Iowa, where there have been several large egg recalls recently, overcrowded conditions documented by undercover investigators at egg production facilities revealed the risk to the public of egg-borne Salmonella infection.

Who is supporting these bills?

The chief authors of these bills, Representative Rod Hamilton (R, 22B), and Senator Doug Magnus (R, 22) are the Chairs of the House and Senate Agriculture Committees, respectively. As Chairs, Hamilton and Magnus have authority to choose which bills they will grant a hearing, and enjoy tremendous influence when it comes to deciding which bills will pass. In the House, the following Representatives have signed on their support: Cornish ; Davids ; Urdahl ; Dettmer ; Anderson, P. ; Drazkowski. In the Senate, the following Senators have signed on to support the bill: Rosen ; Skoe ; Ingebrigtsen ; Sparks.

What are they trying to hide?

The free flow of information and ideas is essential to a free society. Stifling awareness and discussion does not make the problems of an unsafe food supply or of animal cruelty and suffering go away. Legislators should focus on enacting animal welfare reforms, not on hiding what is occurring behind closed doors.

Bills aiming to lessen abuses at Minnesota’s commercial dog and cat breeding facilities have languished for years- currently, unlike most states in the country, there are no state laws regulating this industry in Minnesota.  Yet, instead of taking serious steps to address puppy and kitten mill cruelty, some lawmakers are choosing to shield commercial dog and cat breeders from public scrutiny. Minnesota legislators who do not support the Commercial Dog and Cat Breeder Bill insist the humane community use ‘exiting laws’ to regulate the dog and cat breeding industry. How is it possible to use ‘existing law’, which requires finding and documenting inhumane conditions at puppy and kitten mills, if it is made a criminal offense to do an undercover investigation and publish the results?

Responsible agriculture producers should welcome transparency regarding their animal welfare and food safety practices. Agriculture producers are ultimately responsible to the millions of consumers who buy their food, and they should not try to quell public discussion and discourse on these practices.

Please take action today

April 12, 2011 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

This Brutal Horse Practice was Outlawed Decades Ago – Why Hasn’t it Stopped?

Pet Horse and ownerIn a report issued recently, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Office of Inspector General recommended that veterinarians replace current inspectors for the purpose of examining show horses for evidence of soring, an illegal practice in violation of the Horse Protection Act.

The USDA’s Animal Plant Health and Inspection Service (APHIS) program is responsible for evaluating the horses, but their budget is grossly inadequate, allowing them to send veterinarians to only a very small percentage of horse shows each year.

Conflicts of interest are also a problem.

In order to bridge the APHIS inspection gap, horse show sponsors hire their own inspectors, known as Designated Qualified Persons (DQPs). Since the DQPs are employed by the people putting on the shows, and are often exhibitors themselves, they are not highly motivated to ticket other exhibitors or remove horses from shows.

Penalizing exhibitors with sored horses can result in retribution if those exhibitors work as DQPs at other shows. Pulling sored horses from shows affects the bottom line, which is not something the organizers are in favor of.

As a result, DQPs issue few violations when not accompanied by an APHIS employee.

Another problem is the overt hostility of exhibitors toward APHIS workers at horse shows. The USDA audit revealed cases of inspectors denied access to horses requiring examination, and instances of verbal abuse of inspectors. The hostile environment has led APHIS to bring armed security or police with them to shows.

The USDA’s report states, “Many in the horse show industry do not regard the abuse of horses as a serious problem, and resent USDA inspections. The practice of soring has been ingrained as an acceptable practice in the industry for decades.”

Per dvm360:

In its response to the report, APHIS states that it will seek another $400,000 in funding for 2011 to bring its budget up to $900,000 per year. Another recommendation from the report, publishing lists of Horse Protection Act violators on its website, already has been put into effect by APHIS.

But turning the inspections over solely to veterinarians is not a move APHIS is willing to make right now, says USDA spokesperson Dave Sacks.

“We want to revise the regulations to require those DQPs to be licensed with APHIS and independent from the horse show industry instead of saying it’s going to be nothing but veterinarians,” Sacks explains.

Sources:

Dr. Becker’s Comments:

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I doubt anyone is surprised the APHIS ‘Designated Qualified Person’ horse inspection program isn’t working. Industry self-regulation is an oxymoron on the order of jumbo shrimp.

‘Soring’ – A Benign Term for a Cruel Practice

Soring, in a nutshell, is deliberately hurting a horse to change his gait.

For those of you unfamiliar with the term, APHIS describes it this way in the Horse Protection Act:

Soring is a cruel and abusive practice used to accentuate a horse’s gait. It may be accomplished by irritating or blistering a horse’s forelegs through the application of chemicals such as mustard oil or the use of mechanical devices.

Walking horses are known for possessing a naturally high gait, but in order to be successful in competition their natural gait is often exaggerated. The exaggerated gait can be achieved with proper training and considerable time, however, some horse exhibitors, owners, and trainers have chosen to use improper and inhumane training methods to shorten the time it would take to produce a higher gait without abusive practices.

There are many methods of soring, and some have been held as closely guarded secrets through generations of horse owners and trainers. Among the more common tactics:

  • Applying caustic chemicals like diesel fuel and kerosene on the horse’s pasterns, wrapping the legs in plastic, then adding leg wraps over the plastic so the acid burns into the animal’s flesh.
  • Injecting harmful chemicals or drugs into the pasterns.
  • ‘Pressure shoeing,’ which involves putting an object like a screw, a bolt or even one half of a golf ball against the soles of a horse’s front hooves, then shoeing the animal. An alternate method involves cutting the hoof wall and sole down to the quick, then shoeing over the raw surface.

As a sore horse puts weight on a front leg he feels intense pain, and he pulls his foot up quickly, giving the effect of extraordinary lift in the front. Once he realizes both front feet are painful, he tries to shift his weight to the rear. The resulting gait is known in some circles as the ‘praying mantis crawl.’

History of Soring

Popular in the 1940s and 1950s, Tennessee Walking Horses were known for their exaggerated front leg action. Audiences applauded, and this leg action was also rewarded by horse show judges.

Owners of less gifted horses learned they could produce similar movements in their animals through the use of weighted shoes, weighted chains around the pasterns, and stacked pads.

Over time, as more horses displayed the ‘big lick’ movement, front leg action got higher, and judges rewarded the most dramatic performers in shows, a percentage of trainers turned to ever shadier and harmful tactics to produce quick results in their animals.

Though the practice began with Tennessee Walking Horses, it has spread to other gaited breeds. Gaited horses are those with a natural tendency toward an easy-to-ride, ambling gait that is faster than a walk but slower than a gallop.

A short list of some other gaited breeds includes:

  • American Saddlebred
  • Icelandic horse
  • Missouri Foxtrotter
  • Peruvian Paso
  • Racking horse

There are many completely natural, painless ways to train gaited horses to exaggerate their natural inclination to ‘step lively.’ This harmless method of training takes time and skill, but conscientious owners and trainers of sound horses would have it no other way.

The Situation Today

Despite the fact soring has been illegal since the passage of the Horse Protection Act in 1970, the practice is still prevalent. The USDA’s recent audit and report is evidence of how widespread the problem is.

According to the non-profit Friends of Sound Horses, if every Tennessee Walking Horse show in the U.S. could be inspected, soring violations could be as high as 10,000 to 20,000 a year.

The reason for soring? Human entertainment. Show ribbons. Better breeding fees.

This incredibly cruel practice needs to stop. Hopefully, as a result of the USDA audit, future APHIS inspections will be more widely applied and have more teeth.

In the meantime, organizations like Friends of Sound Horses, Stop Soring and the Humane Society of the U.S. (HSUS) will continue to raise awareness and keep the pressure on APHIS and the horse industry to put an end to the needless torture of walking horses.

Dr. Becker

January 25, 2011 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences | , , | Leave a comment

Temperatures Are Rising: Be a Dog Defender: Help Save Animals This Summer! Cool Ideas for Hot Dogs

Summer is a season for celebrations—the Fourth of July, beach trips, picnics in the park, and (vegan) barbecues! However, it can be a very dangerous time for dogs. Every year, countless dogs die after overheating inside parked cars. We need you to be a dog defender by looking out for dogs who are locked in hot cars.

On a relatively mild 70-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can reach 120 degrees in minutes, even with the windows slightly open. Leaving your dog in the car while you run errands could lead to tragedy. You can be the difference between life and death for dogs this summer.

A Naples, Florida, man was convicted of cruelty when his dog died after being locked in a car for four hours on a warm day. The dead dog’s temperature was still almost 110ºF a full two hours after police removed him from the car. The man was sentenced to six months in jail and slapped with a $1,000 fine for “animal cruelty by abandonment.”

“I always try to have sympathy for defendants before making a decision,” the sentencing judge told the man. “I don’t have any sympathy for you.”

Why was the judge so unsympathetic? Because he believed that the man, a doctor, should have known better than to leave a dog in a car for hours with one window cracked open just an inch. Indeed, all of us should know better, especially when temperatures climb into the 80s and 90s. But even a mild day can be dangerous. Recently, a dog died after being locked in a parked car on a sunny, 67°F day in Albany, New York, even though the car windows had allegedly been left open a crack.

During the “dog days” of summer, the temperature inside a parked car can climb to well above 100ºF in just a matter of minutes. Beating the heat is extra tough for dogs because they can only cool themselves by panting and sweating through their paw pads.

Heatstroke can come on quickly and result in brain damage or death. Watch for symptoms such as restlessness, excessive thirst, heavy panting, lethargy, lack of appetite, dark tongue, rapid heartbeat, fever, vomiting, or lack of coordination. If your dog shows any of these symptoms, get her or him into the shade immediately and call your veterinarian. Lower the animal’s body temperature gradually by providing water to drink, applying a cold towel or ice pack to the head, neck, and chest, or immersing the dog in lukewarm (not cold) water.

“Every summer, we hear about tragedies that could have been prevented,” says PETA casework division manager Martin Mersereau. “Many people don’t realize how quickly animals left in a hot car or outside without shade or water can succumb to the heat.”

Prevent Heatstroke by Taking These Precautions:

Never leave a dog in a parked car. On a mild 73ºF day, the temperature inside a car can reach 120ºF in 30 minutes. On a 90ºF day, the interior of a vehicle can reach 160ºF in minutes.

If you see a dog in a car and in distress, take down the car’s color, model, make, and license-plate number, have the owner paged inside nearby stores, and call local humane authorities or police. Have someone keep an eye on the dog. If police are unresponsive or too slow and the dog’s life appears to be in imminent danger, find a witness (or several) who will back your assessment, take steps to remove the suffering animal, and then wait for authorities to arrive. Contact PETA for a supply of fliers on the dangers of heatstroke to leave on windshields.

Don’t carry your dog in the bed of a pickup truck. This is always dangerous, but the heat brings the added danger of burning the dog’s feet on the hot metal.

Don’t take your dog jogging—except on cool mornings or evenings—and don’t force exercise. On long walks, rest often and take plenty of water. Hot pavement can burn dogs’ paws; choose shady, grassy routes.

Trim heavy-coated dogs’ fur, but leave an inch for protection against insects and sunburn. Keep an eye on areas where hair is thin, like eyelids, ears, and nose as they can get sunburned.

Keep your dog indoors. If he or she must stay outside for long, avoid the hottest part of the day. Provide shade, water, and a kiddie pool. Keep drinking water in an anchored bucket or a heavy bowl that won’t tip over.

Be a watchdog for chained dogs. Make sure that they have food, water, and shelter. If you see a dog in distress, contact humane authorities. Give the dog immediate relief by providing water.


Donate NowYou can improve the lives of dogs and cats suffering from cruelty and neglect.

With summer right around the corner, please sign up to receive your “Too Hot for Spot” online action kit! You will receive a printable version of the “Too Hot for Spot” leaflet. Leave the leaflets on windshields of parked cars to remind people about the dangers of leaving unattended animals inside hot vehicles. The online action kit will also include various online resources to help you spread the word to your friends and family.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

—————-

Thousands of dogs die in hot cars each year. Don’t let it happen to yours ( or any pet you see)

 


Photo: Rebecca Poling

Friday in Southern California a woman left 18 dogs in a parked van intending to be gone only a few minutes.  But apparently her errand took longer than expected.  When animal control authorities were called an hour later, the temperature in the van was 100 degrees.  The dogs were alive, but many were in obvious distress.  The temperature that day was only 76 degrees.

Saturday in Texas we hit 100 degrees for the first time this year.  When it is this hot, it takes less than ten minutes for the inside of a car to reach 120 degrees, even with the windows cracked.  A dog can suffer brain damage at 107 and die at 120.  Even in the morning when it’s cooler, the temperature in your car can increase 20 degrees in just 10 minutes.  No matter how much your dog loves to go along when you run errands, please don’t take a chance.  Leave him home where he is safe.

If you are out shopping and you see a dog locked in a hot car, tell the manager of the store immediately.  Don’t be shy. A smart store manager will know how much his business will suffer if a dog dies in a car in his parking lot and will act quickly.  If that doesn’t work, don’t wait – call 911 immediately and ask the Fire/Rescue be sent.  If the dispatcher hesitates, make sure they understand that your next call will be the media.

It’s a simple message: If you care about your dog, never leave him unattended in a hot car even for a minute.

For more info: United Animal Nation’s My Dog Is Cool website has information to help you spread the word about the dangers of leaving pets in cars.

UAN’s My Dog is Cool Campaign is designed to,

  • Get the word out to individuals and communities about the dangers of hot cars through our life-saving Don’t Leave Me in Here — It’s Hot! Fliers, posters, and other educational materials.
  • Educate the media and the general public, as well as police, emergency workers, and city officials, about steps to take to prevent dogs from dying in hot cars.
  • Remind others not to leave their dogs in parked cars with materials like our “A hot oven or a hot car” poster and our “Hot Temperature” warning sign.

Follow the links at the top of this page to learn how you can help save lives this summer. Or contact us at info@uan.org for more information.

Posted:  Just One More Pet – It is not okay to do nothing, whether it is your pet or not!

June 8, 2010 Posted by | animal abuse, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

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