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Logan’s Law passes big hurdle in attempt to create Michigan animal abusers registry

Logan, a husky owned by Matt Falk of Wales Township, died from complications of someone allegedly spraying acid in his face.

Logan, a husky owned by Matt Falk of Wales Township, died from complications of someone allegedly spraying acid in his face. / Gannett Michigan

By Nicole Hayden – LSJ.com 

Gannett Michigan:  Logan’s Law, a package of four bills designed to fight animal abuse passed through the Michigan House of Representatives Judiciary Committee on Thursday.

“We are pretty excited about the bills being passed through the committee,” said Rep. Paul Muxlow, R-Brown City.

Muxlow sponsored House Bill 4534 of Logan’s Law. The bill stipulates that before someone can adopt a shelter animal, the shelter must use the Internet Criminal History Access Tool, which is a Michigan State Police database, to search for a history of child and spousal abuse and other violence.

The other bills include language that non-profits do not have to pay to access ICHAT; state police will prepare an annual report of animal abuse offenses; and convicted abusers cannot adopt an animal for five years after their time has been served.

The annual report will serve as a registry of animal abusers.

“This is a very big victory for Logan’s Law and for all of the animals in Michigan,” said Matt Falk, owner of Logan, a Siberian husky for whom the law was named.

In 2012, someone splashed Logan, who was in his outside kennel, with acid, Falk said.

“(Logan) liked to sleep outside because it was much cooler,” Falk, of Wales Township, said. “When I went to bring him inside in the morning, I noticed he had red burns on the right side of his face. We immediately rushed him to the vet.”

Falk said that it took four to five days to neutralize the acid.

The bills will now move to the Michigan Senate floor for a vote, then back to the House floor for a full vote before going to the governor to sign into law.

Falk said he hopes “the law will be signed by the summer or early fall of this year.”

Falk, along with House and Senate members, have work on passing the law for two years.

“There has been about 12 different bill numbers for the animal abuse registry all together,” Falk said. “Most of the original bills didn’t make it through the process.”

Falk said he wants to protect other animals from what his dog suffered.

“Logan lost his eyesight, and his sense of smell,” said Falk. “There was a time when his face was just melting off.”

Four months after the attack, Logan died.

“Through our investigations we found there is a lot of animal abuse,” said Muxlow. “There is much more animal abuse than we will ever know or assume of.”

If the bills pass, Michigan will be the first state to enact an animal abuse registry.

“This will be historic legislation,” said Falk. “The bills will set a precedence for other states to begin legislation for registries of their own.”

*Nicole Hayden is a reporter for the Times Herald in Port Huron

February 11, 2014 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, NO KILL NATION, Pets, Political Change, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | 2 Comments

Crews Killing Thousands of Dogs for Sochi Olympic Games

Dogs look out of their cages from a truck on a motorway on the outskirts of China's capital Beijing April 8, 2006. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause

Examiner – According to Friday’s CTV News, in anticipation of the upcoming Olympic games in Sochi, Russia, countless homeless dogs currently roaming the streets are being culled.

Local officials have cited "safety" for visiting guests as the reason for the mass killing; according to the publication, a company has been hired to do the dirty work.

Nightly, roaming dogs are captured in baited traps…then killed with poison.

Rescuers in the area are doing their best to get to the stray dogs first…they try to capture the dogs, get them sterilized and vaccinated, and ultimately adopted into homes.

Unfortunately, the number of un-sterilized, stray dogs makes the rescuers’ job difficult – new litters are constantly being born and the killing crews continue on with their dark, unsavory work.

According to USA Today, last April, the government had stated that they were backing off of their plans to kill an estimated 2,000 dogs, but it appears that the dirty work of killing has simply been transferred to a non-government agency.

Click here to watch the CTV News clip

Just like in China before the Olympics, animals are being killed and abused in Russia. 

Dog Meat In Beijing Ordered Off Menu For Olympics

Olympic Clean-up Chinese Style:  Beijing’s Shocking Cat Death Camps

No Dog Slaughters: End China Dog Culls 

Dogs slaughtered for meat in Vietnam… Stop the Dog Meat Trade 

‘Dogs Have The Intelligence of a Human Toddler’

January 31, 2014 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Outreach for Pets, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | 8 Comments

Obama Admin Gives Green Energy Firms A Pass On Killing Bald Eagles

obama-thumbs-up

Whatever right?

WeaselZippers Via CBS:

The Obama administration said Friday it will allow some companies to kill or injure bald and golden eagles for up to 30 years without penalty, an effort to spur development and investment in green energy while balancing its environmental consequences.

The change, requested by the wind energy industry, will provide legal protection for the lifespan of wind farms and other projects for which companies obtain a permit and make efforts to avoid killing the birds.

An investigation by The Associated Press earlier this year documented the illegal killing of eagles around wind farms, the Obama administration’s reluctance to prosecute such cases and its willingness to help keep the scope of the eagle deaths secret. The White House has championed wind power, a pollution-free energy intended to ease global warming, as a cornerstone of President Barack Obama’s energy plan.

In other areas, too, such as the government’s support for corn-based ethanol to reduce U.S. dependence on gasoline, the White House has allowed the green industry to do not-so-green things. Another AP investigation recently showed that ethanol has proven far more damaging to the environment than politicians promised and much worse than the government admits today.

This April 18, 2013 file photo shows a golden eagle flying over a wind turbine on Duke energy’s top of the world wind farm in Converse County Wyo. The Obama administration will allow companies to seek authorization to kill and harm bald and golden eagles for up to 30 years without penalty in an effort to balance some of the environmental trade-offs of green energy. AP Photo/Dina Cappiello

Under the change announced Friday, companies would have to commit to take additional measures if they kill or injure more eagles than they have estimated they would, or if new information suggests that eagle populations are being affected. The permits would be reviewed every five years, and companies would have to submit reports of how many eagles they kill. Now such reporting is voluntarily, and the Interior Department refuses to release the information.

"This is not a program to kill eagles," said John Anderson, the director of siting policy at the American Wind Energy Association. "This permit program is about conservation."

Wind farms are clusters of turbines as tall as 30-story buildings, with spinning rotors as wide as a passenger jet’s wingspan. Though the blades appear to move slowly, they can reach speeds of up to 170 mph at the tips, creating tornado-like vortexes.

Flying eagles behave like drivers texting on their cellphones; they don’t look up. As they scan below for food, they don’t notice the industrial turbine blades until it is too late.

No wind energy company has obtained permission authorizing the killing, injuring or harassment of eagles, although five-year permits have been available since 2009. That puts the companies at legal risk and discourages private investment in renewable energy.

It also doesn’t necessarily help eagles, since without a permit, companies are not required to take steps to reduce their impact on the birds or report when they kill them.

The new rule makes clear that revoking a permit – which could undermine investments and interest in wind power – is a last resort under the administration’s energy policy.

"We anticipate that implementing additional mitigation measures … will reduce the likelihood of amendments to, or revocation of, the permit," the rule said.

Conservation groups, which have been aligned with the wind industry on other issues, said the decision by the Interior Department sanctioned the killing of an American icon.

"Instead of balancing the need for conservation and renewable energy, Interior wrote the wind industry a blank check," said Audubon President and CEO David Yarnold in a statement. The group said it will challenge the decision.

The wind energy industry has said the change mirrors permits already in place for endangered species, which are more at risk than bald and golden eagles. Bald eagles were removed from the endangered species list in 2007 but are still protected under two federal laws.

The regulation published Friday was not subjected to a full environmental review because the administration classified it as an administrative change.

"The federal government didn’t study the impacts of this rule change even though the (law) requires it," said Kelly Fuller, who formerly headed up the wind campaign at the American Bird Conservancy. "Instead, the feds have decided to break the law and use eagles as lab rats."

The Fish and Wildlife Service said the new rule enables it to better monitor the long-term environmental effects of renewable energy projects.

"Our goal is to ensure that the wind industry sites and operates projects in ways that best minimize and avoid impacts to eagles and other wildlife," the agency said in a statement.

Last month, Duke Energy Corp. pleaded guilty to killing eagles and other birds at two wind farms in Wyoming, the first time a wind energy company has been prosecuted under a law protecting migratory birds.

A study by federal biologists in September found that wind farms since 2008 had killed at least 67 bald and golden eagles, a number that the researchers said was likely underestimated.

It’s unclear what toll, if any, wind energy companies are having on eagle populations locally or regionally. Gunshots, electrocutions and poisonings almost certainly kill more bald and golden eagles than wind farms. But with the industry still growing, the toll could grow, too.

A recent assessment of status of the golden eagle in the western U.S. showed that populations have been decreasing in some areas and rising in others.

AP

Feeding the Eagles

The Amazing Bald Eagle

December 7, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Political Change, Unusual Stories, Wild Animals | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

World’s Oldest Animal Found, Then Killed

Ming the clam, the oldest animal discovered - © James Scourse, School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor University

Ming the clam was the oldest animal ever — then scientists killed it

Guys, scientists found out a clam they discovered a few years ago was the OLDEST LIVING ANIMAL EVER — hurray! But they’ve also confessed that they accidentally killed it when they opened it up to see how old it was — oh. Ming the clam was thought to be around 405 years old when it was found by researchers in Iceland in 2006, but more recent dating methods have determined that Ming was actually 507 years old. That means the mollusk made its way into the world around 1499, which explains how it got its posthumous name (Ming was the Chinese dynasty in power when the clam was born).

Unfortunately, Ming’s life came to an unglamorous end when it was opened up for scrutiny the first time around — a move researchers wouldn’t have made if they had suspected how old it really was. "We got [the age] wrong the first time, and maybe we were a bit hasty publishing our findings back then," ocean scientist Paul Butler told ScienceNordic. We don’t think the newly discovered discrepancy makes a difference to Ming now, but thanks for coming clean. [Source] [Source] [Source]

November 15, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Unusual Stories, Wild Animals | , , , , | 2 Comments

Help Stop Abuse… Animals, Pets, Seniors, Spousal, All Abuse

Embedded image permalink

Twitter: Diana L. Pizarro@Tudorican

EVERYONE WHO FOLLOWS ME. PLEASE LOOK @This Scum Bags FACE. PLS RETWEET. HE HAS TO GET CAUGHT. PLS RT, PLS RT pic.twitter.com/H5MN3xBFMF

If you now who this scum bucket is, know (or know of) any other scum like him or if you know of any abuse… Get-involved, Step-In if you feel you can, and definitely Report It…

Animals abusers are almost always abusers throughout their lives!!

Please share this photo with everyone you know and help find this abuser.

Related:

Severely beaten dog found in Columbus is dead 

Patrick: Abuser Located and Charged

Domestic and Animal Abuse

The S.A.A.V. Program – Sheltering Animals of Abuse Victims Program

Pet Abuse Registry Started in NY by Suffolk County SPCA… An Idea That is Waaaay Overdue and Needed Everywhere, So Let’s Do It!!

Father Arrested for Allegedly Killing Family Dog in Front of Children

November 2, 2013 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pet Abuse, Pets, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Adopting Military Dogs

American Thinker: Those that were chosen to defend America, upon retirement, need a family to love. The military has a great adoption program for their military dogs. American Thinker had the privilege to interview Shane Larsen, who is the military working dog adoptions coordinator. He is a former Air Force staff sergeant who was an instructor and trainer at the Lackland Canine School as well as a former handler.

The adoption program originated in November 2000 as a result of the "Robby Law," preventing the euthanization of four-legged warriors. Robby, a Belgian Malinois dog was euthanized even though his handler made every effort to adopt him. Although this law did not save Robby, it specifies that the military dog can and should be adopted. Those first in line are any of the former handlers, next in line are law enforcement agencies, and finally qualified families.

The dogs up for adoption are either those that did not pass the rigorous certification process to become a military working dog, a training dog that no longer could perform, or those that have been in combat with some medical issues. A family gets dog that has been spayed or neutered, while only having to incur a cost of the collar, leash, and transportation fees. Anyone adopting must go to the base where the dog is stationed and pick them up in person after going through a face-to-face interview with Larsen and the dog. Larsen noted, "Those dogs that do not meet the standards is due to behavioral and environmental issues, where they are unable to handle their job. However, before a dog is put up for adoption many different people evaluate them. If they are put up for adoption, I consider it an honor that I am the one responsible to find a home. You have to be a dog lover to work in this field."

Ninety to ninety-five percent of the former handlers adopt their partner. The home base handles the adoption with Lackland being the middleman who signs off on the paperwork. The kennel master at the home base is the one to notify the previous handlers that the dog is in the adoption program. It is not hard to find the handler since, according to Larsen, "There is a list of every handler who ever worked with the dog so they can be tracked down."

The average age for those retired is about 9 years, while the average age for those who do not make it through the training program is 16 to 18 months. Since most law enforcement agencies will not take a dog over the age of four there are a lot of older adult dogs available. Lackland Air Force Base in Texas has the largest volume of dogs, in the hundreds. But, if someone does not want to travel there, they can try adopting from a base near them since "where ever there are dogs there will be adoptions."

How does the process work if someone is interested? The DOD has come a long way since the "Robby Law." There is a lot of scrutiny that goes into someone being selected. A person must fill out a detailed application by hand or electronically. Since there are 500 to 600 applicants the wait period is an average of 12 to 18 months. One of the first questions is, "what is the ideal dog you are looking for?" In this case, the more specific someone is about age, sex, or breed the longer they may have to wait.

Through a rigorous screening process Larsen makes sure that people understand about the breed they are adopting. Since the wait period is long he uses it to his advantage by re-asking the questions during a face-to-face or phone interview and comparing that to the answers given on the application.

He told American Thinker that an important consideration is a person’s housing situation. "If they want a younger dog and live in an apartment what is their exercise program? Living on an upper floor of an apartment with only stairs is also not suitable for an older dog. Also, we usually will not adopt a dog out to anyone with children eight years or younger. Sometimes I will go through 20 to 25 applications to find the right person for a particular dog. We are very, very picky as to who will get a dog. A lot of people do not qualify."

From time to time there are those adopters who realize they made a bad decision, but unfortunately once the adoption is finalized the dog is their responsibility and they must find the dog a new home. Thankfully, because of the scrutiny and the detailed explanations of what is expected "this usually does not happen. We make sure a very detailed medical history is given out as well as making the adopter aware of a particular condition, the commands the dog knows, and what are the preferred toys. In fact, the feedback I get from the adopters is that once you have a military working dog it is hard to get any other type of dog. There is no comparison regarding the passion, the bond, and the attachment these dogs show, which is why repeaters are willing to wait months."

A military dog should be adopted because it is an act of kindness, although it may be on the part of the dog. Anyone who has adopted a military dog or plans on doing it will be able to pay back these four-legged warriors with the luxury of a loving home. Larsen said it best, "Those adopting will get a lifelong companion that has served their country and will form a bond like something they never had before."

By Elise Cooper, who writes book reviews, author interviews, and has written a number of national security, political, and foreign policy articles for American Thinker.

October 20, 2013 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Adoption, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Service and Military Animals, Stop Euthenization, Success Stories, Working and Military Dogs and Related | 2 Comments

Chinese poaching of rare mammal exposed by boating accident

Pangolin

Pangolins are long, lizard-like land mammals covered with scales, which make them look like pine cones when they roll themselves up for protection. (Jefri Tarigan / Associated Press / March 1, 2013)

By Barbara Demick – April 16, 2013, 7:22 a.m. – Los Angeles Times

A boating accident off the Philippines coast has exposed Chinese poaching of a protected species of scaly anteater, or pangolin, prized in traditional medicine.

A 500-ton Chinese fishing vessel, the Min Long Yu, crashed into a coral reef April 8. When the boat was inspected, authorities found more than 2,000 butchered pangolins rolled up and packed into 400 boxes. It is one of the largest hauls of the species, which is subject to an international trade ban.

Pangolins are long, lizard-like land mammals covered with scales, which make them look like pine cones when they roll themselves up for protection.

The meat of this strange animal is considered a delicacy in southern China, while the scales are thought to have medicinal properties to treat asthma and cancer and to induce lactation in new mothers.

Filipino authorities are holding 12 Chinese members of the ship’s crew on charges of poaching and attempted bribery, and they face further charges of damaging the coral reef, which is in a UNESCO-protected marine sanctuary, Tubbataha Reef. Earlier this year, a U.S. Navy ship got stuck on a coral reef in the same marine park and had to be dismantled.

The incident seems likely to add another element of contention between China and the Philippines, already in dispute over sovereignty of fishing waters.

"It is bad enough that these Chinese have illegally entered our seas, navigated without boat papers and crashed recklessly into a national marine park and World Heritage Site," Jose Maria Lorenzo Tan, the chief executive of World Wildlife Fund-Philippines, said in a statement. "However, it is simply deplorable that they appear to be posing as fishermen to trade in illegal wildlife.’ "

The environmental group said it wasn’t sure yet whether the pangolins came from Malaysia or the Philippines.

April 18, 2013 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Hundreds of family pets, protected species killed by little known federal agency

Maggie1[1]

Fox News: It was an August morning two years ago when Maggie, a spry, 7-year-old border collie, slipped through the backyard fence of her family’s suburban Oregon home. Minutes later, she was dead – her neck snapped by a body-gripping trap set by the U.S. government less than 50 feet from the home she shared with the four children who loved her.

"It is an image that will never leave me," Maggie’s owner, Denise McCurtain, of Gresham, Ore., said of her death. "She was still breathing as we tried to remove the trap. Her eyes were open and she was looking at me. All I could say was ‘I’m trying so hard. You didn’t do anything wrong.’"

Maggie’s death at a minimum was one of hundreds of accidental killings of pets over the last decade acknowledged by Wildlife Services, a little-known branch of the U.S. Department of Agriculture that is tasked with destroying animals seen as threats to people, agriculture and the environment. Critics, including a source within the USDA, told FoxNews.com that the government’s taxpayer-funded Predator Control program and its killing methods are random — and at times, illegal.

Over the years, Wildlife Services has killed thousands of non-target animals in several states – from pet dogs to protected species – caught in body-gripping conibear traps and leg hold snares, or poisoned by lethal M-44 devices that explode sodium cyanide capsules when triggered by a wild animal – or the snout of a curious family pet.

The McCurtains, like many other families, were never informed that such deadly devices were placed so close to their home in grass near the edge of a pond where their young son kicks his soccer ball and their daughter catches turtles.

The traps, set on communal property owned by the neighborhood association, were meant to kill an infestation of nutria, rat-like pests that pose no danger to people but can be harmful to the environment. The only warning sign was a small placard in the grass that identified the device as government property and cautioned against tampering with it. The neighborhood association told the McCurtains it never would have approved such traps had it known they were so deadly.

"It’s unconscionable that anybody with an ounce of common sense would set these traps in an area frequented by the public and their pets," said Brooks Fahy, executive director of Predator Defense, a national watchdog group that advocates non-lethal predator control.

"It’s unconscionable that anybody with an ounce of common sense would set these traps in an area frequented by the public and their pets."

- Brooks Fahy, executive director of Predator Defense

The M-44′s intended targets are coyotes that kill or harass livestock primarily in the western states, where Wildlife Services is most active and critical to farmers protecting their livestock.

But, like Maggie, there often are unintended victims — like a puppy belonging to J.D. and Angel Walker of Santa Anna, Texas.

In February 2011, the couple’s 18-month-old pit bull was killed when it sniffed and pulled on a meat-scented M-44 placed about 900 feet from its home.

Kyle Traweek, the Wildlife Services employee who set the device, violated at least three M-44 restrictions set by the Environmental Protection Agency, according to Texas officials. In a June 6, 2012, letter reprimanding Traweek, the Texas Department of Agriculture said he broke EPA rules by placing the cyanide in an area where "exposure to the public and family and pets is probable."

Click here to read the letter

Traweek is no longer employed by Wildlife Services, although his departure was not related to the incident in Texas, according to a spokeswoman with the Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service (APHIS), a division of the USDA that oversees the program.

It is difficult to verify the number of accidental killings of pets each year by Wildlife Services, in part because many go unrecorded, according to multiple sources.

A management source within the USDA claims Wildlife Services employees are told not to document the accidental killings of pets if it can be avoided.

"They are told to get rid of the leash and bury the dog," said the source, who spoke to FoxNews.com on condition of anonymity.

The source also alleged that in some instances in Arizona, California and Minnesota, the killings of pets are intentional – often with the knowledge, approval and encouragement of upper level Wildlife Services management.

"There have been cases of them shooting and killing dogs," the source said. "They’ll just claim it was feral, vicious or rabid. They think they can do anything they want."

In court documents obtained by FoxNews.com, Christopher Brennan, a California-based Wildlife Services employee, told a Mendocino County Superior Court judge that he has shot hundreds of "free-ranging" dogs who he claimed were preying on livestock. During the Sept. 1, 2009, hearing – involving a restraining order between Brennan and a neighbor – the judge asked Brennan how many dogs he has killed as a government trapper over the last 10 years.

"Probably close to 400," Brennan replied, according to the court transcript.

Carol Bannerman, an APHIS spokeswoman, confirmed Tuesday that Brennan is still employed as a "wildlife specialist" for the agency. Bannerman claimed Brennan works in an area where there is a large number of unleashed dogs that harass or kill livestock — and said there is a "significant population" of privately owned guard dogs, mostly pit bulls, that are allegedly left to roam freely so they can protect illegal marijuana crops.

"None of the feral and free-ranging dogs lethally removed in California last year were non-targets," Bannerman said. "Some non-target dogs were trapped and released."

In January, a Wildlife Services employee was arrested in Arizona and charged with felony animal cruelty after allegedly using a government trap to capture a neighbor’s dog he deemed problematic. The employee, identified as Russell Files, set up the leg-hold device during work hours to trap the animal, which was covered in blood from trying to chew its way out of the device when police arrived on the scene. An APHIS official would not comment on whether Files is still working for the government, citing an ongoing investigation.

Wildlife Services described the overall harm to pets and non-target wildlife as “rare.”

"Wildlife Services provides expert federal leadership to responsibly manage one of our nation’s most precious resources — our wildlife," APHIS spokeswoman Tanya Espinosa said in a statement. “We seek to resolve conflict between people and wildlife in the safest and most humane ways possible, with the least negative consequences to wildlife overall.”

The program said that accidental killings account for less than one percent of wildlife removed for damage concerns – and claimed that number is even lower for pets.

Wildlife Services, which has been in place since 1895, touts its mission as critical, priding itself on protecting the country’s agriculture and natural resources from destructive wildlife – damage that can be costly for landowners and businesses.

According to a 2010 report by the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), U.S. farmers and ranchers spent $188 million during 2010 on non-lethal ways to protect their land and livestock. That number has declined from 2006, when NASS estimated annual investments in non-lethal methods to be at $199 million.

The USDA says that despite such investments, approximately 647,000 cattle, sheep and goat are killed by predators each year, resulting in an annual loss of more than $137 million. The lost animals do not include chickens and turkeys.

But Carson Barylak, federal policy adviser of the Animal Welfare Institute, is skeptical of the USDA’s statements. She said the danger posed by predatory animals is exaggerated.

"The very reports that Wildlife Services cite for these figures show that [attacks by wild predators have] a relatively small impact on the livestock industry. In the case of cattle, for instance, under a quarter of a percent of the nation’s stock was lost to predators in 2010 according to the program’s records."

The exact number of pet animals and protected species killed over the years by the agency is one that will likely never be known.

A report by the Sacramento Bee, which investigated the program last year, claimed its employees have accidentally killed more than 50,000 non-target animals since 2000, including federally protected golden and bald eagles. The newspaper also reported that more than 1,100 dogs, including family pets, were destroyed by government traps or poison within those same years. Other known cases include serious injuries to pets that result in leg amputations, as well as harm to humans who come in contact with the cyanide.

Doug McKenna, a longtime criminal investigator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – a separate agency that falls under the Department of Interior – said he probed many killings of non-predatory and protected species by Wildlife Services over the years.

"The Bald Eagle is a scavenger bird, so of course if it flies down to investigate a carcass that is placed near a leg hold trap, it will get caught in it," he said. If the trap is not checked in a timely manner, the eagle is left to die. Such deaths are a violation of federal law, like the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, first passed in 1940.

McKenna said that in the case of M-44 cyanide devices, state governments must grant employees permission to place them as well as post warning signs for the public.

"Any access point into the property has to have signs that M-44’s are being used and it has to be in English and Spanish," he said.

For pet owners, seeking legal recourse against the government is a daunting and tedious process – requiring individuals to file a tort claim that typically results in families losing more money even if they win.

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"Most people do not pursue litigation when they realize the financial cost, the time involvement and the limit on recovery for damages being the actual value of their pet," said Oregon-based attorney Daniel Stotter, who handles many of these cases.

"The bottom line is that the federal government has limited liability in all lawsuits involving tort claims, damage to property or persons. You can sue the federal government for certain things, like negligence, but you cannot seek punitive damages," he said, adding that victims are responsible for covering their own legal fees.

“The government knows that when they injure or kill an animal, they’re more likely to not have financial repercussions," he said.

For families like the McCurtains and Walkers, there is no price to be paid for the emotional toll of losing a pet.

"It is losing a member of the family," Angel Walker said. "You can’t really get past it."

March 15, 2013 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures, Wild Animals | , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Pets Being Left Behind to Starve by Their Families

Ill Have An Everything

By AskMarion

Many or us have pets that have lives like the one above.

But far too many have sad, horrible and unthinkable lives.

First there is the group of crazies and sickos, the abusers, who abuse animals, children, their mates, the elderly and anyone who comes in contact with them.  That group, in my opinion, should never be allowed to own an animal and should receive punishment equal to the crime(s) they commit.  And offenses committed against animals should get the same punishment as like crimes against humans.  Abuse is abuse and abuses know now bounds or limits.  If you suspect abuse, please report it or intercede.  Better to be wrong than look the other way and find out you were right later.

And then we come to the less obvious abusers, equally cruel and growing in number!  They are the selfish, often young people, who think animals are toys and fashion accessories; the owners you give their pets up because they no longer fit their needs or into their lifestyle; and finally the worst who are those who leave their pets and animals behind to starve and die a cruel death… without food, water and in all alone. (In my perfect world the last group would left to die in the same manner that they left the helpless creatures that were in their charge… should have been part of their family.)  And many of these heartless people leave their family pets behind, rather than finding them a new home or least taking them to a rescue or shelter or calling animal control and allow their children to see (or realize) their parent’s cruelty.

We are all God’s creatures and you can bet that these people will pay later, but it is each or our responsibilities to help prevent these situations and report and abuse or potential abuse.

There are three types of people:  Those who love animals and take care of them until their natural passing as if they were part of their family, family members; those who like animals, treat them well but not like family members, but always to at least the right thing for the pets and animals in their charge; and then there are the abusers which include the ‘emotionally disabled’ who leave their pets and animals to die instead of finding them a new home or help.

Why not advertise or ask around for people to adopt your pet?  Why not take them to a shelter or a rescue?  Why not call Animal Control?  And worst of all why leave them tied up or locked in a house where the can’t leave or escape without food or water. (BTW that is illegal, inhumane and surely will guarantee you a spot in Hell!?!)

Please join the fight to prevent, stop and intercede in all types of cruelty and abuse and better yet if it is suspected and can be prevented in advance, sound the alert.

Related:

100+ Abandoned Dogs Left to Starve in the Everglades

Foreclosure Crisis Leads to More Homeless Pets to the Rescue!

Out of Style and Up For Adoption – Hundreds Of Miniature ‘Handbag Dogs’ Abandoned by Owners

Homeless Pets Strut Down 700 Fashion Catwalks

Homeless With Pets – Choosing Pets Over Shelter

A Social Entrepreneur Helps Homeless Dogs

Where there is a will…

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

Humane Society list of pet financial aid-related organizations

The “ex”-Middle & Upper Class Homeless

A Patchwork of Food Assistance for Pets

American Humane: Help us continue to offer Foreclosure Pets Grants.

Pets feel the crunch of the economic crisis

California Shelters Overflowing with Chihuahuas

Judge Rules: NYC Must Create More Animal Shelters

Doomed Dogs Get On The Rescue Wagon to Other Shelters

Homeless California Chihuahuas Being Flown Out of State

Rachael Ray donates $500,000, food to Sandy pets

 

 

Rachal Ray donated $500.000 to help animals affected by hurricane Sandy and 4 tons of Nutritious food for them.

November 18, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Cop blows away dog ‘for no good reason’… again – Why does this keep happening?

‘I can’t live in this town. What is wrong with you?’  I agree but have now lived in supposed pet/animal friendly Austin where the police has killed a least 4-dogs this past year in questionable situations… and it is happening in other areas.  Why are we putting up with it?

Time to demand that the penalty for the unwarranted killing or harming of pets (animals) by anyone become much tougher… MUCH!!

WND:

Scout the dog was shot and killed by police in St. Louis, Michigan

Residents in the small town of St. Louis, Mich., are in an uproar after a local police officer shot a dog on its own property on Sunday afternoon.

The 8-year-old golden retriever named Scout was owned by Brian and Hillary Goetzinger, who were inside their home when the incident took place.

“I heard a pop, pop, pop, pop, pop, and I was like, ‘What is going on?’” Brian Goetzinger told WNEM-TV. “So I stood up and looked out this window right here out of my house, and I see the St. Louis Police Department standing over my dog, and that’s all bloody, laying right here.”

According to a police report filed by Officer Matt Vanhall, the officer was on patrol in the neighborhood when the dog darted out in front of his cruiser.

“I had to hit the brakes very hard to avoid hitting the dog,” he said in the report.

Vanhall got out of his car and followed the dog to its own yard.

“I could see the dog standing in the yard of the residence about six feet in front of the open gate,” Vanhall said.

He approached the gate without entering and whistled to Scout, saying, “Come here pup,” and the dog “jumped off the deck and ran at me. I began backing away as fast as I could in a backward direction. I immediately noticed the dog was showing its teeth and I could hear the dog growling very loudly.”

According to the Morning Sun newspaper, Vanhall kicked at the dog a couple of times as the dog tried to bite his leg, he claimed in the report. He repeated the action and the dog continued to try to bite his leg.

“At this point the dog was within three feet of me and I was running a backwards circular motion so as not to turn my back on the dog,” he wrote. “At this time I pulled my service weapon and rapidly fired seven shots while backing away from the dog as quickly as I could.”

He says most of the shots missed, but he thought the canine had been shot in its hind legs and mouth, and thus was no longer a threat.

But a neighbor who witnessed the entire incident has a very different account of the shooting.

“It wasn’t provoked. It wasn’t warranted,” said Lori Lynne Walmsley. “He just started shooting him. He just kept shooting him in the head, and I saw it like six or eight times. And I just couldn’t believe it. I can’t live in this town. What is wrong with you?”

On Monday, Walmsley said she had seen the bullets enter the dog and became traumatized.

In her statement to police, she says before the shooting, Officer Vanhall had asked her if the dog was hers.

“And I said, “No, but it is my new friend.”

The dog then scampered back to his yard and got behind the gate.

The policeman, she wrote, “tried to force the dog out. The dog made a low, mild growl declaring his displeasure at being forced from his ‘safe’ haven (and at the same time assumed he needed to protect his property,)” she wrote.

“The dog never attacked the cop. He never jumped, tried to bite or threaten him, but the cop drew his gun as if in a panicked frenzy,” she wrote. “He shot the dog like it was ‘Cujo’ at least six or eight times.”

The dog was still alive after being shot, and despite being rushed to a veterinarian, it died of its injuries.

“I just couldn’t believe that, let alone the police were in my yard shooting anything, let alone my dog, who was sweet,” Goetzinger told WNEM. “He’s been our family pet for at least eight years. We’ve had him since he was a puppy. My daughter sleeps with him periodically, and he’s just the nicest dog. He’s never attacked anyone ever. So I just couldn’t understand why someone would shoot him.”

Police Chief Patrick Herblet told the station his officer was “absolutely” justified in shooting Scout.

“He felt threatened,” Herblet said. “The dog came at him. It growled. It showed its teeth. He backed away. He tried to kick it away a couple times and it kept at him. And he felt the only thing he could do was pull his service revolver, and he shot.”

The city of St. Louis has a leash law aimed at keeping dogs from running through the streets.

Police reports have been turned over to the local prosecutor.

“The matter is under review,” Gratiot County Prosecutor Keith Kushion told the Morning Sun. “I have the initial reports and the dog owner showed up at the office and said that there were inaccuracies in the report.”

Meanwhile, incensed citizens in the region are expressing their outrage online:

  • Heather Morse: “He called the dog, then felt threatened when the dog came towards him? Why didn’t he go to the door first? What is wrong with this cop?”
  • Kevin Blackhurst: “Time to cut this Barney Fife from the force and the chief who protects him.”
  • Grace Rooks McCormick: “Hmmm maybe he could have called animal control, the big wus!”
  • Sam Snyder: “This is appalling! If an officer came to my home, provoked our family pet and killed it, I would have attacked that pathetic excuse for a cop myself. Everyone should call their station at (989) 681-5285  or email the chief at pherblet@stlouismi.com and let them know that this kind of brutality will not be tolerated by public officials. This ‘officer’ needs to be held accountable for this crime.”

September 12, 2012 Posted by | animal abuse, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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