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Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

CANADA: Another Case of Dog Jihad?

Bare Naked Islam:

YORK: Dog found critically injured and near death with the number ’191′ chemically branded onto his sides. Not rushing to judgment here, but consider this: the York region has a large population of Muslims. Muslims consider dogs filthy. Recently, countless dogs in Muslim areas of the UK and Europe have been found poisoned to death.

Below is a passage from the Quran commonly associated with the number 191:

2:191

QURAN 2:191 And kill them wherever you overtake them and expel them from wherever they have expelled you, and fitnah is worse than killing. And do not fight them at al-Masjid al- Haram until they fight you there. But if they fight you, then kill them. Such is the recompense of the disbelievers.
York Region (h/t Susan K) When she found it, it was skin and bones, bleeding from the top of its skull, blind in its right eye, on the verge of death with 191 bleached into both sides of its torso with some sort of chemical. Rarely, if ever, had York Regional Police Const. Netashia McLellan’s heartstrings been tugged so violently.

Since Sunday, when she found him, the Ontario SPCA nursed “Lucky 191″ back to health. The police officer kept tabs on it, as she had previously worked as an animal control officer with the organization.
While the hound has made an “astonishing” recovery and remains comfortable with humans, it has often been seen with its tail between its hind legs. Despite the dog’s injuries, the Ontario SPCA is yet to classify the case as animal abuse. (Exactly what DOES constitute ‘animal abuse’ up there?) Instead, its investigators and police are working to find the dog’s owners.
So far, the theories on how it ended up this way range from being victimized by a twisted individual (You’re getting warmer) to being a former hunting dog that could have escaped and been hit by a car. (Back to freezing your ass off)

As for Const. McLellan, she said she said, “When I found him curled up in a ball, his breathing was erratic. I knew he was struggling,” she said. “This is very upsetting.”
Her theory is the dog could have been used for fox hunting and the numbers used to identify its owner.The hound could have also competed in trials, where dogs are put through a series of obstacles. (Fox hunting dogs are some of the best cared-for dogs on the planet and they don’t brand them like that) Const. McLellan said she is considering adopting the dog, to go along with her three others.
The Ontario SPCA said it has already spent a “couple of thousand dollars” to nurse Lucky back to health. If you have information about this case, call police on 1-888-668-7722, ext. 392. (Not to worry, BNI Canadian reader, Susan K, has already contacted them)

Related:

Banning Dogs as Pets

Jihad making lives “Ruff” for Dogs in Europe; PETA Silent

Muslims in Spain Declare Jihad on Dogs

Man’s Best Friend in Shariah’s Cruel Crosshairs

Dogs… Pets – Beyond Traditional Islam

The Latest Enemies of Iran: Dogs and Their Owners

Iran Cleric Says Dogs “Unclean” and Not to be Kept as Pets

1 Million Stray Dogs in Iraq to be Culled

Department of Islamic Justice Bows Down to Muslims Irrational Hatred of Dogs……. SHEER INSANITY !!!!

Pakistani Blogger Slams Islamic Feast of EID

Operation Bagdad Pups – No Buddy Gets Left Behind

First the Greenies Want Us to Eat Our Dogs… Now the Academics Say it is Insulting to Call Them Pets

Shocking Report… Gov’t to Decide What Pets You Can Own

Help Save USMC Sergeant Rex – Updated

PAKISTANI BLOGGER SLAMS ISLAMIC FEAST OF EID: ‘CALL ME AN INFIDEL’ BUT I CAN‘T ’MAKE MERRY‘ AT ’MASS-MURDERING’ CUTE ANIMALS

November 29, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , | Leave a comment

Dogs at Work Can Alleviate Employee Stress, Study Shows

Dogs At Work

Story at-a-glance
  • A recent study indicates pet owners who bring their dogs to work have less stress throughout the day than pet owners whose dogs are at home, and non-pet owners.
  • Employees with dogs at home experience increasing levels of stress during the workday as the number of hours their pet has been left alone piles up.
  • Researchers preliminarily concluded dogs in the workplace might alleviate the effects of stress for their owners, and may also contribute to higher job satisfaction for all employees in the organization, regardless of dog or pet ownership.

Because not all employees appreciate the presence of dogs in the workplace, it’s important for employers contemplating allowing pets at work to set guidelines and remain sensitive to the needs of non-pet owning workers. Otherwise, dogs in the workplace could actually increase the general stress level among employees.

By Dr. Becker

A recent study looked at the impact of pet dogs in the workplace. Specifically, the researchers – four from Virginia Commonwealth University and one from Wright-Patterson AFB in Ohio — wanted to find out how the presence of employees’ dogs effects stress levels and job satisfaction.

The Experiment

The study took place over a single workweek. Employees were divided into three groups:

  • DOG group (employees who brought their dogs to work)
  • NODOG group (employees who owned dogs but left them at home)
  • NOPET group (employees who didn’t own pets)

Employee stress levels were measured using a visual analog scale (VAS) and by measuring morning cortisol levels. A VAS is a psychological measurement tool used in questionnaires. It’s designed to assess subjective characteristics or attitudes that cannot be directly measured. Study participants give their level of agreement to a VAS question by picking a position (for example, “none,” “mild,” “moderate,” or “severe”) on a continuous line between two end-points.

Researchers also measured employee attitudes toward the workplace and toward animals in the workplace

Study Results

VAS scores were lowest for the DOG group, middle-of-the-road for the NOPET group, and highest for the NODOG group. Interestingly, the stress level of employees with dogs at home increased significantly as the day wore on, indicating working pet owners may grow anxious the longer their dogs are left alone.

Over the course of the workday, stress decreased for the DOG group and increased for the NODOG and NOPET groups. The NODOG group had much higher stress levels than the DOG group at the end of the day. Also, the researchers observed a marked difference in stress patterns for the DOG group depending on whether or not their pets were with them on a particular day. On days when they left their dogs home, the owners’ stress level elevated throughout the day very similar to the pattern of the NODOG group.

Employee feelings about dogs in the workplace ranged from mostly positive for those who brought their dogs to work, to mostly negative for non-pet owners who were bothered by noise, disruption or hygiene issues created by the presence of the dogs.

The researchers concluded their preliminary findings demonstrate dogs in the workplace may mitigate the effects of stress for their owners, and may also contribute to higher job satisfaction for all employees in the organization, regardless of dog or pet ownership.

However…

Dr. Kathleen Ruby of Washington State University, writing for Clinician’s Brief, offers the following caution for veterinary professionals and employers who may be contemplating a bring-your-dog-to-work initiative:

“This study indicated that while some love doggy colleagues, some do not. The bell curve reasserts itself in this debate and may divide as much as it unites. As pet promoters, veterinary professionals would do well to advise employers seeking to add pet visits to benefit packages to set guidelines about cleanliness, behavior, and owner/pet breaks before opening the office door to the dogs. Failure to do so may stress as many as it soothes.”

Related:

12 companies that let you bring your dog to work

Chapman University Hosts ‘Furry Friends For Finals’

Londonderry School Uses Therapy Dog in Classroom

November 26, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet and Animal Training, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Success Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , | 2 Comments

Stem Cell Enhancers for Dogs, Cats, Horses

StemPetsStemEquine

Stem cells can be thought of as master cells and are most abundantly found in the bone marrow of people and also in your pets. With age, the number of stem cells circulating in the body gradually decreases leaving it more susceptible to injury and other age related health challenges.

StemPets®  and StemEquine®, by StemTech Health Sciences, Inc., help support the release of stem cells from the bone marrow of dogs, cats and horses into the blood stream. Through a natural process those stem cells then travel to the areas of the body where they are most needed.

Simply supporting the natural process of stem cell release from the bone marrow can help your pets (dogs, cats, horses) achieve optimal health. StemPets® and StemEquine®, are specially formulated for your pets.

Purchase Stem Enhance, StemFlo®, STEMpets, StemSport®, from our online shopping cart at a retail price.

Products are available at wholesale prices for distributors. Becoming a distributor is easy and economical. Distributors have the opportunity for the StemTech product line to be the core of their own home based business.

For More Information Contact:

MCE Group, Independent Business Owners

Stem Tech Health Sciences

Visit Our Website or Email Marion and Tim through the site or at JustOneMorePet@gmail.com or call them Direct at 512-810-78888

In addition to StemPets® , Stemtech’s animal product line includes StemEquine® for horses. Stemtech’s line of stem cell nutrition products for humans includes SE2™, StemFlo®, StemSport®, and ST-5 with MigraStem™. These products are designed to work together as a system to provide you with the optimal health.

Our own AskMarion (and her husband Tim) of Just One More Pet and Marion’s Pet Sitting and Dog Walkers give StemPets and StemEquine to their own pets and recommend them to for the pet clients, as well as taking them themselves and recommending to them to their clients pet parents.

November 26, 2012 Posted by | animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, pet products, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Pets Displaced by Sandy Find Temporary Home

The ASPCA Emergency Boarding Facility has been up and running in Brooklyn since Saturday November 17! Our dedicated staff and volunteers are currently caring for about 150 animals and providing relief to Sandy victims who need temporary housing for their pets.

St Bernard Resuced After Hurricane Sandy

Check out photos of the operation in our Facebook album.

This week, we received pets at locations near the hardest hit areas, including the Rockaways and Coney Island on Monday and Tuesday and Staten Island and Red Hook later in the week. The facility has also welcomed pets who were being housed at evacuation centers or a Sean Casey Animal Rescue facility, as well as animals dropped off directly by their families.

Made possible in part thanks to a $500,000 grant from Rachael Ray, this free service was created in response to the many pet parents who asked for a place to board animals until they found new homes. With the help of volunteers from the ASPCA Adoption Center, Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals and elsewhere, we’re aiming to give hundreds of families a chance to rebuild their lives without having to say goodbye to their beloved furry family members.

Watch this blog for updates.

If you or someone you know was affected by Sandy and would like to use our free boarding service, please read this post for details.

If you would like to donate to our Disaster Relief Fund, you can do so here.

Rachael Ray donates $500,000, food to Sandy pets

Rachal Ray donated $500.000 to help animals affected by hurricane Sandy and 4 tons of Nutritious food for them.

Related:

Breezy Point Queens in Ruins – 15-Days After Hurricane Sandy

Horrors of FEMA disaster relief

If You Have to Evacuate to a Shelter, Many in New York and New Jersey Will Allow You to Bring Your Pets

Pets Being Left Behind to Starve by Their Families

November 24, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Outreach for Pets, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thanksgiving/Holiday Safety Tips For Pets

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“Holidays Are Great and Fun To Share With Our Pets, Who Love To Be Part of the Family Activities, As Long As We Avoid the No-No Foods”

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While giving your pets Thanksgiving leftovers or scraps from the table can be a heartwarming experience for you and an exciting experience for them, it is important to be aware of which Thanksgiving leftovers are pet friendly, and which ones should remain in your fridge and away from your pets’ food dish.

To help you decipher which Thanksgiving leftovers are safe for your pets to eat, we have compiled two lists below — a “safe” list and a “not safe” list — that you can use as a quick reference during your Thanksgiving meal. But be sure to pay attention to the pets mentioned in the lists, and how the food should be prepared; just because something is safe for a dog doesn’t mean it’s safe for a cat.

If you, or your family, eat a food during the Thanksgiving holiday that is not mentioned on the lists below, do some additional research or talk to your local vet about the safety of the food in question.

Thanksgiving/Holiday Safety Tips For Pets

‘Tis the season for friends, family and holiday feasts—but also for possible distress for our animal companions. Pets won’t be so thankful if they munch on undercooked turkey or a pet-unfriendly floral arrangement, or if they stumble upon an unattended alcoholic drink.

Check out the following tips from ASPCA experts for a fulfilling Thanksgiving that your pets can enjoy, too.

Sage Advice
Sage can make your Thanksgiving stuffing taste delish, but it and many other herbs contain essential oils and resins that can cause gastrointestinal upset and central nervous system depression to pets if eaten in large quantities. Cats are especially sensitive to the effects of certain essential oils.

No Bread Dough
Don’t spoil your pet’s holiday by giving him raw bread dough. According to ASPCA experts, when raw bread dough is ingested, an animal’s body heat causes the dough to rise in his stomach. As it expands, the pet may experience vomiting, severe abdominal pain and bloating, which could become a life-threatening emergency, requiring surgery.

Don’t Let Them Eat Cake
If you’re baking up Thanksgiving cakes, be sure your pets keep their noses out of the batter, especially if it includes raw eggs—they could contain salmonella bacteria that may lead to food poisoning.

Too Much of a Good Thing
Boneless pieces of cooked turkey, some mashed potato or even a lick of pumpkin pie or cheese cake shouldn’t pose a problem. However, don’t allow your pets to overindulge, especially if you don’t normally cook for your pets, as they could wind up with a case of stomach upset, diarrhea or even worse—an inflammatory condition of the pancreas known as pancreatitis. In fact, if your pets have sensitive stomachs, it is best to keep them on their regular diets during the holidays with just some table scraps added to their food.

A Feast Fit for a Kong
While the humans are chowing down, give your cat and dog their own little feast. Offer them rawhide strips, Nylabones or made-for-pet chew bones. Or stuff their usual dinner—perhaps with a few added tidbits of turkey, vegetables (try sweet potato or green beans) and dribbles of gravy—inside a Kong toy. They’ll be happily occupied for awhile, working hard to extract their dinner from the toy.

The “Safe” List

Cranberry Sauce

While cranberry sauce is safe for most dogs, it has the potential to make them a little wild or give them an upset stomach if they’re not used to fruit or foods high in sugar. So if you want to give your dogs a little cranberry sauce this holiday season, start out slow and see how your dog reacts. Cranberry sauce should also be safe for cats and potbellied pigs, but again, only in small portions.

Green Beans

Safe for cats, dogs, potbellied pigs and guinea pigs, green beans that are low in sodium (try using unsalted ones) can actually be good for your pets when served in moderation. As long as the green beans you have leftover this Thanksgiving don’t have anything extra added (no green bean casserole!) they are pet friendly Thanksgiving leftovers.

Ice Cream (Dogs Only), a Few Licks of Pumpkin Pie, Cheesecake or Carrot Cake Without Nuts

While it is not a good idea to give your cat, guinea pig, potbellied pig, or any other common pet type ice cream this Thanksgiving, ice cream is safe for dogs to eat in small amounts as long as it contains no chocolate. A few licks of pumpkin pie, cheesecake or carrot cake without nuts are also fine.

Macaroni and Cheese (Dogs and Potbellied Pigs Only)

As long as you don’t give you dog or potbellied pig too much macaroni and cheese, it is safe for them to eat on occasion, but not all the time.

Mashed Potatoes

As long as you don’t add anything extra to your mashed potatoes (such as cheese, sour cream, or gravy) mashed potatoes should be safe for dogs, cats, and pigs. But again, remember portion control: don’t give them too much, and consider mixing a little bit of mashed potatoes into their dry food instead of giving them mashed potatoes by itself.

Turkey

While leftover turkey can be safe for dogs, cats, and potbellied pigs, make sure that the turkey does not have any bones, and that any excess fat and the skin has been removed. Also be careful about portion control, not giving your pets — no matter how big they are — human sized portions of turkey. It will be very rich for them, and could cause them to be sick if given too much. If you decide to feed your pet a little nibble of turkey, make sure it’s boneless and well-cooked. Don’t offer her raw or undercooked turkey, which may contain salmonella bacteria.

The “Not So Safe” List

The following foods are not safe for dogs, cats, potbellied pigs, or guinea pigs. Never give the following foods or beverages to your pets:

  • Alcohol of any kind
  • Anything with Caffeine
  • Bones from Ham, Chicken, or Turkey
  • Candied Yams
  • Casseroles (unless you absolutely know that none of the no-no foods are in them)
  • Chocolate and Cocoa (this includes things like brownies and chocolate chip cookies) and dark chocolate is the worst
  • Jell-O Molds
  • Macadamia Nuts (this includes things like cookies and pies) and go easy on nuts in general
  • Pecan Pie
  • Potato Skins
  • Pork Products because of the nitrates
  • Stuffing (it usually contains onions, which is very harmful to pets)
  • Anything with onions in it (and garlic should be fed in moderation)
  • Anything with Xylitol in it
  • Grapes or raisins
  • Raw eggs
  • Mushrooms
  • Baby food if it contains onion powder
  • Milk (and American Cheese) can be a problem for some dogs. They can be lactose intolerant like some people.
  • Avocados – especially for birds and cats

Poinsettias:
These plants are probably the most popular holiday plant and are easily recognizable by their large red, white, pink, or mottled leaves. These plants also contain a thick, milky irritant sap. In general, it would take ingestion of a large amount of this plant to see possible clinical signs in your pet. Signs could include vomiting, anorexia and depression. The symptoms are generally self-limiting and treatment is rarely needed. Your Vet may recommend limiting food and water intake for 1 or 2 hours if your pet is suspected of becoming sick after ingestion of poinsettias. Ingestion of poinsettias will not kill your pets, but keeping them out of reach is a good idea; and fake ones might be even a better idea!

Thanksgiving Pet Recipe of the Day
Simple Roasted Organs

(This is a great recipe to make up for Thanksgiving to feed your canine friends… you can substitute chicken for the turkey and add a few turkey scraps at carving time, or just bake the liver and giblets and add the warm turkey as you carve… just go easy on the skin and watch for bones.)

This dish can actually double up as a treat, or healthy topping to your pet’s usual meal. Turkey giblets (hearts, livers and kidneys) are available from butcher shops and many natural food markets – and also come included with most Thanksgiving turkeys!

This recipe is super-simple and just about all pets love it! Since this recipe is cooked, turkey necks should not be used.

Ingredients

Up to 1 lb Turkey scraps, organs/giblets (don’t include bones)

6 tbsp Olive Oil

½ tsp Dried or Fresh Rosemary

1 Clove Garlic, crushed or finely diced (optional)

Preparation

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Arrange the organs on a baking sheet. Slowly pour on the olive and gently shake the pan so that the oil is evenly distributed. Sprinkle on the rosemary and crushed garlic. Place in the oven and cook for about 35 minutes, until golden brown. Cool before serving and refrigerate any leftovers for up to 3 days.

For cats, dice the organs finely with a sharp knife before serving. This technique also works well to create bite-sized training treats that are a little bit different.

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November 23, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , | Leave a comment

Pets Being Left Behind to Starve by Their Families

Ill Have An Everything

By AskMarion

Many or us have pets that have lives like the one above.

But far too many have sad, horrible and unthinkable lives.

First there is the group of crazies and sickos, the abusers, who abuse animals, children, their mates, the elderly and anyone who comes in contact with them.  That group, in my opinion, should never be allowed to own an animal and should receive punishment equal to the crime(s) they commit.  And offenses committed against animals should get the same punishment as like crimes against humans.  Abuse is abuse and abuses know now bounds or limits.  If you suspect abuse, please report it or intercede.  Better to be wrong than look the other way and find out you were right later.

And then we come to the less obvious abusers, equally cruel and growing in number!  They are the selfish, often young people, who think animals are toys and fashion accessories; the owners you give their pets up because they no longer fit their needs or into their lifestyle; and finally the worst who are those who leave their pets and animals behind to starve and die a cruel death… without food, water and in all alone. (In my perfect world the last group would left to die in the same manner that they left the helpless creatures that were in their charge… should have been part of their family.)  And many of these heartless people leave their family pets behind, rather than finding them a new home or least taking them to a rescue or shelter or calling animal control and allow their children to see (or realize) their parent’s cruelty.

We are all God’s creatures and you can bet that these people will pay later, but it is each or our responsibilities to help prevent these situations and report and abuse or potential abuse.

There are three types of people:  Those who love animals and take care of them until their natural passing as if they were part of their family, family members; those who like animals, treat them well but not like family members, but always to at least the right thing for the pets and animals in their charge; and then there are the abusers which include the ‘emotionally disabled’ who leave their pets and animals to die instead of finding them a new home or help.

Why not advertise or ask around for people to adopt your pet?  Why not take them to a shelter or a rescue?  Why not call Animal Control?  And worst of all why leave them tied up or locked in a house where the can’t leave or escape without food or water. (BTW that is illegal, inhumane and surely will guarantee you a spot in Hell!?!)

Please join the fight to prevent, stop and intercede in all types of cruelty and abuse and better yet if it is suspected and can be prevented in advance, sound the alert.

Related:

100+ Abandoned Dogs Left to Starve in the Everglades

Foreclosure Crisis Leads to More Homeless Pets to the Rescue!

Out of Style and Up For Adoption – Hundreds Of Miniature ‘Handbag Dogs’ Abandoned by Owners

Homeless Pets Strut Down 700 Fashion Catwalks

Homeless With Pets – Choosing Pets Over Shelter

A Social Entrepreneur Helps Homeless Dogs

Where there is a will…

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

Humane Society list of pet financial aid-related organizations

The “ex”-Middle & Upper Class Homeless

A Patchwork of Food Assistance for Pets

American Humane: Help us continue to offer Foreclosure Pets Grants.

Pets feel the crunch of the economic crisis

California Shelters Overflowing with Chihuahuas

Judge Rules: NYC Must Create More Animal Shelters

Doomed Dogs Get On The Rescue Wagon to Other Shelters

Homeless California Chihuahuas Being Flown Out of State

Rachael Ray donates $500,000, food to Sandy pets

 

 

Rachal Ray donated $500.000 to help animals affected by hurricane Sandy and 4 tons of Nutritious food for them.

November 18, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal Abandonement, animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, Stop Euthenization, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

The Dangers of Genetically Modified Ingredients in Pet Food

Pet Food

Story at-a-glance
  • If you’re feeding your dog or cat a commercial pet food containing corn-based ingredients, chances are those ingredients are genetically modified. Over 60 percent of corn grown in the U.S. is genetically modified.
  • Studies of rats fed GM corn show evidence of severe kidney and liver disease, negative effects on the heart, spleen, and other organs, massive tumors, and premature death.
  • While the impact of GM foods on dogs and cats has not been scientifically studied, many scientists suspect these products have some common toxic effects and may cause disorders of the liver, pancreas and kidneys in humans and animals.
  • Dr. Michael W. Fox believes the high number of skin and food allergies, and other allergies associated with GI disorders in dogs and cats are caused or aggravated by novel proteins and other contaminants found in genetically modified crops.
  • Even conventionally grown corn is not a biologically appropriate food for dogs or cats. Both corn and soy products are linked to a wide variety of health problems in companion animals.

By Dr. Becker

For those of you still feeding your dog or cat a commercial pet food with corn-based ingredients – which includes most inexpensive pet foods on the market today – here’s a big heads-up and another reason to reconsider the diet you’re offering your four-legged companion.

Chances are the corn products in your pet’s food are genetically modified (GM). This means the seeds have been chemically altered to produce plants that can withstand repeated spraying with Monsanto’s Roundup weed killer.

Estimates in 2009 were that over 60 percent of corn grown in the U.S. is genetically modified, and according to more recent information from NaturalNews.com,1 Monsanto has disclosed that half the sweet corn grown on U.S. farms comes from genetically modified seed.

Genetically Modified Corn and Its Effect on Rats

Previous studies have shown that genetically modified corn causes significant kidney and liver disease in rats after only a 90-day feeding trial,2 and has a negative effect on other organs as well, including the heart and spleen.

Now a new lifetime study of rats fed a diet containing GM corn shows they not only died earlier than rats on a standard diet, they developed mammary tumors and severe kidney and liver damage as well.3

According to researchers, half the male rats and 70 percent of females died prematurely, compared with 30 percent of males and 20 percent of females in the control group.

Lead researcher Gilles-Eric Seralini of the University of Caen, believes his study involving the full lifespan of rats gives a more comprehensive and realistic view of the risks of GM corn than 90-day feeding trials. A rat at three months is still a young adult.

GM Foods and Your Pet

If you’re wondering how GM corn might affect your dog or cat, unfortunately, the specifics have yet to be studied. However, in an article published in 2009 in the journal Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition regarding GM foods, the authors, Greek scientists, assert:

"The results of most of the rather few studies conducted with GM foods indicate that they may cause hepatic, pancreatic, renal, and reproductive effects and may alter hematological, biochemical, and immunologic parameters the significance of which remains unknown. The above results indicate that many GM foods have some common toxic effects. Therefore, further studies should be conducted in order to elucidate the mechanism dominating this action. Small amounts of ingested DNA may not be broken down under digestive processes and there is a possibility that this DNA may either enter the bloodstream or be excreted, especially in individuals with abnormal digestion as a result of chronic gastrointestinal disease or with immunodeficiency."4

Dr. Michael W. Fox has also compiled an extensive list of the potential risks of genetically modified foods, including:

  • The toxic insecticidal agent Bacillus thuringiensis is present in most GM crops in the U.S. that wind up in animal feed and pet food.
  • Glufosinate and glyphosate, which are herbicides, are applied to millions of acres of genetically modified crops across the U.S. and other countries. These poisons are absorbed by the crops – which are engineered to be herbicide resistant – while decimating everything else growing in the area and much of the aquatic life in nearby bodies of water.

    These herbicides cause kidney damage in animals, endocrine disruption and birth defects in frogs, and are lethal to many amphibians. Glyphosate has also been linked to miscarriages, premature births, and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, in humans.

  • Nutritionists and other health experts increasingly are connecting the rise in human allergies, including skin conditions and inflammatory GI disorders to broader consumption of GM foods and food additives – in particular, GM soy products containing novel proteins. Dr. Fox suspects the high number of skin and food allergies, and other allergies associated with GI disorders are caused or aggravated by these novel proteins and other contaminants in genetically modified crops.
  • Independent animal feeding safety studies show adverse or unexplained effects of GM foods, including inflammation and abnormal cell growth in the GI tract, as well as in the liver, kidney, testicles, heart, pancreas and brain.
  • GM crops have proven to be unstable and prone to unplanned mutations – which means we don’t really know whether the food being grown from these plants is safe or nutritious.

Dr. Fox’s advice to pet owners is to buy only food with USDA Organic certification. He also advises consumers to avoid all prepared foods, including cooking oils that contain corn and soy products, since these are the products most likely to originate from GM crops.

In addition to Dr. Fox’s advice, I recommend omitting grains entirely from your carnivorous pet’s diet. Corn and soy ingredients are not biologically appropriate ingredients in dog and cat food, even if they are conventionally grown. Both these ingredients are linked to a wide variety of health problems in companion animals, including allergies, skin disorders, oral disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and cystitis.

November 14, 2012 Posted by | Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Veteran’s Day Parade Participants

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    Related:

    1st national monument for war dogs honors four-legged pup soldiers of World War II and beyond

    Happy Veterans Day – The Amazing Bald Eagle

    Tucson: Pets, Vets, Veterans Day

    November 13, 2012 Posted by | Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Events, pet fun, Pet Health, Pets | , | Leave a comment

    1st national monument for war dogs honors four-legged pup soldiers of World War II and beyond

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    The Military Working Dog Teams National Monument (Dogs For Defense Save Lives)

    Fox News:

    LOS ANGELES – The act of Congress is in the books, the bills are paid, the sculptures are being cast, and one of the biggest parades in the world will start a glory tour and countdown to dedication.

    The first national monument to pay tribute to military dogs will be unveiled in California in just two months. The U.S. Working Dog Teams National Monument will honor every dog that has served in combat since World War II.

    Some cities, cemeteries and military bases across the country already have such memorials. But none has been elevated to national monument level, where it will be in the company of the Statue of Liberty, Yosemite National Park and Mount Rushmore National Memorial.

    In 2000, John Burnam, a 65-year-old veteran military dog handler, wrote a book called "Dog Tags of Courage." A year later, he got an email from a reader wondering why there were no national monuments to the dogs of war.

    In "Dog Tags" and a 2008 book, "A Soldier’s Best Friend," Burnam wrote about his time with the Army’s 44th Scout Dog Platoon when he was in Vietnam in 1967 and 1968.

    His first dog, Timber, was injured in an ambush a few months after they teamed up, so he spent most of his tour with a German shepherd named Clipper.

    "He saved my life and saved the lives of others by alerting on ambushes, snipers and booby traps. I wanted to give something back to these animals that have done so much and asked for so little, except for food and water and the love of their handlers," said Burnam, who received the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star and Purple Heart.

    Back then, handlers were not able to adopt their dogs when they were retired.

    "I always worried about them but I know they died over there and they died as heroes," he said.

    In 2004, Burnam and two other dog handler veterans pursued the idea in earnest, forming the John Burnam Monument Foundation Inc. But it took two more years, until he met Rep. Walter B. Jones, R-N.C., that the monument project started to take shape.

    In 2007, Jones introduced legislation authorizing establishment of the monument. Passed unanimously by Congress, it was signed the next year by President George W. Bush, then amended and signed by President Barack Obama.

    Burnam designed the monument, which depicts the modern military handler and four dogs — a Doberman, German shepherd, Labrador retriever and Belgian Malinois, all breeds used in wars.

    The silicon bronze handler stands more than 9 feet tall and weighs 1,500 pounds. Each dog is about 5 feet tall and weighs 550 pounds. Burnam called them "hero-sized."

    The figures will stand on a pedestal, in front of a large granite wall. One side of the wall will have photos etched in black marble veneer showing dog teams in combat from the different wars. The other side will have an inscription written by Burnam.

    The sculptor, Paula Slater, said it was the largest and most complex monument she had ever done. She worked for thousands of hours, saying that finishing a project of that size "is like giving birth to a baby — five of them."

    The money for the monument came slowly. Burnam made one of many fundraising pitches on the reality TV show "Who Let the Dogs Out," featuring Tillman, the skateboarding, surfing and snowboarding bulldog. The president of Natural Balance Pet Foods Inc., the company that Tillman represents, attended the show taping and volunteered to pitch in more than $1 million.

    "Don’t do a thing. Natural Balance and Petco (Animal Supplies Inc.) will take care of it," Joey Herrick said. To raise funds for the monument and its maintenance, Natural Balance created a jerky bark treat sold by Petco. Maddie’s Fund, a family-funded pet rescue foundation, also signed on as a corporate sponsor.

    The public will get a sneak peak of the monument at the Tournament of Roses parade in Pasadena on Jan. 1, when a floral replica will be used as Natural Balance’s float. Burnam, dogs and handlers from every military service branch will ride on it.

    When the float goes on display afterward at Victory Park, the real bronze monument will make its public debut next to it, Herrick said. Then the bronze monument will go on tour as it heads to Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. The location was chosen as the site for the monument because that’s where most of the nation’s military’s dogs are trained.

    Meanwhile, Tillman, the dog that helped get Burnam the monument funding, is also getting personal recognition for his military service. For his work entertaining troops at bases and for going through a mini Marine boot camp, the athletic bulldog has been made an honorary private 1st class.

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    November 12, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pet and Animal Training, Political Change, Service and Military Animals, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences, We Are All God's Creatures, Working and Military Dogs and Related | , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

    Training Dogs to Climb Stairs

    dog-walk-stairs-800x800

    Our pups, Chihuahuas and Chiweenies have climbed inside and short flights of stairs since they were babies, but we just moved to the 3rd floor in complex that has open staircases.  It has take several weeks to get them used to walking up at a normal clip. They are afraid when they look down as we go higher.

    Many dogs learn to navigate stairs as young puppies so need no encouragement to bound up or down any staircase, but for other dogs, the stairs can present a frightening obstacle that they would rather avoid than learn to overcome.

    Training a dog (any pet) to walk up and down stairs takes patience and encouragement from you. By using reward techniques to alleviate your pet’s anxiety, you can tackle and often the problem.

    When your dog gets older he or she can have a very difficult time going up and down stairs. Stairs can be dangerous to an elderly dog, like elderly humans. You need to make sure that you’re there for your dog so that no injuries occur.

    Also if you have a dog or cat with health issues or that suffers from anxieties, and many do, it might take additional time, they might need help or patience or you might just have to pick them up or train them to use piddle pads indoors so they have to make the climb less often.

    AskMarion at JOMP

    November 11, 2012 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Friendship and Love, pet products, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , | Leave a comment

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