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Department of Islamic Justice Bows Down to Muslims Irrational Hatred of Dogs……. SHEER INSANITY !!!!

It’s time to get serious about eliminating Sharia Law, and all Muslim idiocies, like this one, so contact and pressure Congress to get rid of all Muslims consulting government, military, Obama’s administration, universities!!!!  Europe has already political correctnessed themselves onto the road of oblivion.  There is no one blinder than he who will not see and will not learn from others!  Tony~

Dept. of Islamic Justice Bows Down to Muslims Irrational Hatred of D…

barenakedislam – Cross-Posted at TeaParty.org – h/t to Claudia Johnson

Because Muslims consider dogs to be filthy, the cases of pet dogs being poisoned in Europe and Turkey have skyrocketed. And now, this Muslim dog insanity is being submitted to by the Islamopandering Obama Regime, who have ruled that ‘Guide Horses’ must be allowed in shops, restaurants and even on airplanes.

logic from DOJ: Miniature horses are viable alternatives to dogs for individuals with allergies, or for those whose religious beliefs preclude the use of dogs,” the rules state. A recent Justice Department ruling that allows miniature horses to be used instead of dogs as service animals for the blind and handicapped, also mandates that shops, restaurants, hotels and even airlines be forced to allow service horses into their establishments or face lawsuits if they refuse to accommodate horses.
First, let me tell you why the use of horses as service animal is both stupid and cruel to the animals. Horses are NOT domestic animals as dogs and cats are. Horses are not physically compatible with an indoor life in a typical home. Horses, no matter how small, are grazing animals who require several hours a day of outside turnout where they can roam and graze at leisure. Horses cannot be housebroken which means these guide horses are fitted with a diaper – humiliating. To confine a horse to a house with only a limited amount of slow walking as exercise is cruel and unusual punishment.

Horses require a lot more room than dogs.. Dogs are fed and walked a couple of times a day, while horses eat hay and grass and produce waste throughout the day. Even the smallest mini needs an 8-by-10-foot stall and room to run around for exercise. Walking slowly in a harness does not constitute exercise for a horse. A horse is meant to be in an environment where he can move about, small or not, eat throughout the day and be with his buddies.
Horses don’t get fleas, but they do get parasites, ticks and attract flies.
Now that the Department of ‘Islamic’ Justice has ruled that service horses must be allowed in all retail establishments, there will be a run on people getting mini service horses, knowing that they can sue any business or restaurant that refuses to allow them in. I can see CAIR sponsoring a program to give horses to Muslims, just so they can sue even more businesses for ‘Islamophobic’ discrimination.
But just as fast as people may rush to get in on the newest fad, once they find out how difficult it is to properly care for horses, they will abandon them, leaving the animals homeless if it doesn’t work out. It’s not unusual, unfortunately, for them to end up on the slaughterhouse floor because there’s no home for them.
Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) is trying to have this stupid mandate overturned. As he stated:

“What I object to,” said Chaffetz, “is the Department of Justice forcing businesses and restaurants…. think about airplanes. Look, even the Miniature Horse Association has come out and said, look, you can’t potty train, for instance, a horse to the same degree you can a canine. And so it just seems like the federal government, the Department of Justice, is going overboard in issuing a rule. Sure enough, they issued a rule, March 14th, and within a week, restaurants being sued in California for not allowing horses into their restaurant. It just seems absurd, just over the top.
This reflects a fundamental misunderstanding of what the ADA regulations require. Those regulations specifically define "service animals" to include dogs only. As the regulations specifically say, "[o]ther species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of this definition." 28 C.F.R. 36.104. A business is required to accommodate service animals — dogs — except where "[t]he animal is out of control and the animal’s handler does not take effective action to control it" or "[t]he animal is not housebroken." 28 C.F.R. 36.302(c). So, even if we’re dealing with a service dog, if it’s not housebroken, a business does not have to let it in.
FOX NEWS Already there is a lawsuit in Los Angeles by Jose Estrada, the plaintiff in the case filed this month in Los Angeles court. His attorney, Morse Mehrban, told FoxNews.com that a dog "doesn’t have the sufficient strength to pull him in his wheelchair."
So Estrada, a paraplegic, uses a 29-inch-high miniature horse named Princess. According to the complaint, the two retail stores being sued "refused to permit said animal" inside along with Estrada last month. The suit says Princess "is housebroken" and would not "compromise" the safety of those two stores. Estrada is suing for "no less than" $4,000 in damages.
The federal rules state that businesses should allow in the horses as long as they’re trained, considering such factors as the size of the horse, whether it’s under control, whether it’s "housebroken," and whether its presence would compromise "legitimate safety requirements."
Amador says the horses cannot be housebroken.
The Guide Horse Foundation, though, says on its website that the horses "learn exactly the same behaviors as a guide dog," and that they "never bite or kick except when attacked." (That is crap! Horses will bite or kick for many reasons. But the biggest problem is horses, by nature, will spook and run away from a myriad of seemingly non-scary objects. I know from many years with horses, that they will spook at a plastic bag blowing in the wind, a piece of white paper on the ground, a loud noise, a dog that runs up to it, rustling leaves, and more. Nearly anything can and will spook a horse at one time or another. And because the horse’s natural instinct is to run away, that is what they will do every time)
The organization could not be reached for comment.
The American Miniature Horse Association does not condone the use of miniature horses for that purpose. Association President Harry Elder applauded those who have received "ADA certification" to train animals but questioned the use of miniature horses. "Although the American Miniature Horse is bred to be intelligent, curious, gentle, sensible, willing to cooperate and easy to train, it remains in all respects physically and instinctively a true horse. The American Miniature Horse can be readily trained to be lead or driven but, in most cases, it would not make a suitable replacement for an animal such as a guide dog," he said in a statement.

Guide Horse NO! Why Miniature Horses should NOT be used as Guide Animals for the Blind. In fact, they are a DANGEROUS alternative to a Guide Dog.
Not that it will do you any good, but you can contact the DOJ here:
Eric Holder
202-353-1555 
http://www.justice.gov/

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PAKISTANI BLOGGER SLAMS ISLAMIC FEAST OF EID: ‘CALL ME AN INFIDEL’ BUT I CAN‘T ’MAKE MERRY‘ AT ’MASS-MURDERING’ CUTE ANIMALS

June 30, 2012 Posted by | animal abuse, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet and Animal Training, Political Change, Service and Military Animals, Stop Animal Cruelty, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures, Working and Military Dogs and Related | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 15 Comments

Do Vaccinations Affect the Health of our Pets?

Story at-a-glance

  • The AHVMA Foundation is an effort by the AHVMA organization and holistic veterinarians to make a difference in their profession by finding ways to support research into the theory and practice of complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM), and to expand CAVM education into more veterinary schools across the U.S.
  • The foundation’s goal is to find financial support from unbiased individuals and organizations with no agenda other than to learn what works and what doesn’t in CAVM. They want to support CAVM techniques by developing better evidence.
  • Another foundation goal is to develop a wholly independent, certified PhD program in veterinary nutrition based on documented scientific evidence of the benefits of species-appropriate diets.
  • The foundation also plans to tackle the problem of over-vaccination of pets and the larger issue of how traditional veterinary medicine can create or contribute to illness, when the goal should be to create wellness.
  • Between now and July 2, 2012, every $1 donated to the AHVMA Foundation toward the “Be One in a Million” campaign will be automatically doubled. That’s right – MercolaHealthyPets.com will contribute $2 for every $1 donation to the foundation from June 25th through July 2nd.

    Video:  Do Vaccinations Affect the Health of our Pets?

    In this video, Dr. Karen Becker interviews Dr. Barbara Royal, founding member of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA), about an exciting new campaign the foundation is kicking off.

    By Dr. Becker

    Today I have a very special guest, Dr. Barbara Royal. Dr. Royal is one of the founding members of the AHVMA Foundation.

    I’m very excited about this interview because the AHVMA (American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association) Foundation is very close to my heart, and I want all of you watching here today to understand why I’m so passionate about this organization.

    A Little about the Foundation

    The AHVMA Foundation has been in existence for quite some time, but Dr. Royal and other board members are steering it in a new, exciting direction. I asked Dr. Royal to explain a little about the foundation.

    The foundation has two co-directors, three board members including Dr. Royal, and an executive director. This structure is fairly recent. As mentioned, the foundation has been in existence for quite some time — funding scholarships and other small projects, and working quietly behind the scenes to encourage holistically-oriented curriculums in veterinary schools.

    More recently, the members decided the foundation has an opportunity to have a much greater impact on the practice and teaching of complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM), and that’s the direction they’re headed in now.

    I asked Dr. Royal to talk about the goals of the foundation. She explained that it is an effort by the AHVMA organization and holistic veterinarians to make a difference in their profession by finding ways to support research into the theory and practice of CAVM, and to expand CAVM education into more veterinary schools across the U.S.

    As Dr. Royal points out, most of the research done in veterinary medicine is funded by government agencies, large corporations and pharmaceutical companies that have a stake in the results. The research is undertaken specifically to promote a certain type of processed pet food, a new drug, a piece of surgical equipment, or some other profit-making product.

    But when someone wants to research a natural ingredient for pets, for example, or a nutraceutical – something low-profile that doesn’t carry a patent or trademark – there’s little or no funding available.

    The Goal: Independently Funded Research into Alternative Veterinary Medicine

    What the AHVMA Foundation wants to do is raise the money necessary to facilitate research into alternative veterinary therapies, and to provide more CAVM coursework in veterinary schools. And their goal is to find financial support from unbiased individuals and organizations with no agenda other than to learn what works and what doesn’t. They want to assist the entry of CAVM techniques into evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine is defined as:

    “The judicious use of the best current available scientific research in making decisions about the care of patients. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is intended to integrate clinical expertise with the research evidence and patient values.” (MedicineNet.com)

    In order to conduct independent research not backed by special interests like pet food manufacturers or veterinary pharmaceutical companies, the funding has to come from private citizens and groups.

    And as Dr. Royal explains, veterinarians must also to come together as a group to impact the direction of future research. DVMs have to make a conscious, collective decision not to simply take whatever data is offered by Big Pharma and large pet food companies and call it a day. They have to have interest in finding out what’s real and what’s not for themselves.

    Dr. Royal believes the AHVMA Foundation has the ability to bring in money to start funding research and education projects that will provide scientific evidence of the value of alternative veterinary therapies. This research will support what holistic and integrative vets already know about what works and what doesn’t in CAVM. It will also provide evidence of the benefits of integrating Western and alternative medicine techniques to make a much bigger positive impact on the health of animals.

    Lack of Research Means Lack of DVMs Willing to Explore Alternative Therapies

    Dr. Royal and I and most holistic/integrative practitioners have had experiences with colleagues in the traditional veterinary community in which we’ve found ourselves defending our integrative approach.

    Part of the reason for their viewpoint is the lack of scientific research into the modalities used in CAVM. There is some human-directed research available using rats and primates, but dog and cat research just isn’t there. And many vets seem to use the lack of research as an excuse to ignore alternative methods of healing, which isn’t necessarily correct

    Because there is more research into integrative medicine for humans than animals, we often find ourselves experimenting with human model treatments to see what works for our animal patients.

    Both Dr. Royal and I have had a great deal of success integrating alternative therapies into our treatment plans, but because there’s so little scientific evidence pertaining to animals to back up what we’re doing, our traditionally trained colleagues remain skeptical.

    We simply have no research we can point to for many of the things we do in our practices – we just know they work because we’ve used them successfully. Having actual research to point to would pull many more traditional vets toward learning about CAVM and incorporating it into their practices. And that would be a win for everyone.

    In evidence-based medicine, a doctor or vet can treat a patient with a new therapy that appears to work, but if he or she doesn’t publish the work, then that information doesn’t technically exist. No veterinary school or researcher can know about it.

    When doctors and DVMs want to find new treatments, they search the medical literature. If no study is published then there is no evidence of a potential healing tool to help your pet or a human family member. Only through properly done research and publication can new tools and potential healing therapies gain wider awareness and use. Research and education are essential in addressing the gap in knowledge between clinicians with special training in CAVM and those in traditional veterinary schools.

    Another Goal: A PhD Program in Pet Food, Based on Species-Appropriate Nutrition

    Dr. Royal believes the AHVMA Foundation should also create a PhD program in animal nutrition – a program not funded by commercial food companies. Obviously, a veterinary nutrition education program developed by a pet food company has built-in conflict of interest issues.

    In fact, when Dr. Royal was in veterinary school, nutrition class consisted of visits by corporate employees to talk about their products. And hers isn’t an isolated case. This is the extent of the “objective” education many vet students receive in pet nutrition. Some veterinary schools don’t offer a nutrition program at all.

    Holistic practitioners learn about nutrition outside their formal DVM education. Dr. Royal picked up much of her knowledge when she worked in zoo medicine. She learned what happens to animals when they aren’t able to eat food appropriate for their species. This is the kind of truly objective information every vet student needs.

    So another of Dr. Royal’s goals for the foundation is to create a certified PhD program in veterinary nutrition that is based on documented scientific evidence of the benefits of species-appropriate diets.

    In my view, this one groundbreaking program could do more to improve the health and vitality of pets than almost anything else.

    How Dr. Royal Gravitated to Integrative Veterinary Medicine

    Next I asked Dr. Royal when she decided to broaden her traditional veterinary skills to incorporate alternative medicine techniques.

    She responded it actually sort of took her by surprise. As a vet student, if anyone had asked her if she planned to be an alternative practitioner, she says she would have laughed.

    Dr. Royal explained that when she graduated from vet school she was very serious about practicing Western veterinary medicine. She also had experience with zoo medicine and felt confident about her knowledge of different species. But she soon discovered she wasn’t able to help a lot of her very sensitive patients or exotic animals using the Westernized drugs-and-surgery medical model she learned in school.

    At the time she had a lot of racing greyhound patients. Greyhounds are an extremely sensitive breed and can’t tolerate many of the drugs used in veterinary medicine. So these poor dogs would come in, in pain, and Dr. Royal would have to send them away untreated. It felt awful not to be able to help those patients.

    So she decided to learn acupuncture. On her first day of class, the instructor stood up and said, “This is going to change your life.” And Dr. Royal thought to herself, “Oh, please.” And then, of course, it did indeed change her life.

    Her acupuncture training not only gave her the skills to perform the procedure, it also made a big difference in how she came to view the practice of medicine. There is more than one way to promote healing, and the body can teach us things. Primarily what Dr. Royal took away from the training was the importance of nutrition as the foundation of good health. The decisions we make about what to put in our dog’s or cat’s food bowl are the most important health choices we make for them.

    When Dr. Royal attended Tufts University for extra coursework in herbal medicine and nutrition, she became even more passionate about alternative therapies.

    From my viewpoint, the AHVMA is an interesting organization because its members are veterinarians who aren’t satisfied to practice just one method of treating patients. Holistic practitioners seek to fill their toolboxes with resources so they can help a wide variety of animals with a wide variety of health challenges.

    When a holistic vet doesn’t see progress using a certain medical technique, he or she goes looking for a different tool in the toolbox. Holistic vets are never satisfied with saying, “There’s nothing more we can do.”

    Vaccinations: How Many Does a Dog or Cat Really Need?

    The foundation is actively involved in supporting the Rabies Challenge Fund, a research project intended to show the rabies vaccine actually provides protection for at least five to seven years, and perhaps for a lifetime.

    The Rabies Challenge Fund involves ongoing FDA-level research that Dr. Royal believes will ultimately change the way veterinary medicine is practiced. Repetitive vaccinations are not only unnecessary in the vast majority of cases, they also carry significant risk of adverse reactions and establishment of permanent, chronic disease.

    Many traditional vet practices are set up around the idea of yearly vaccinations. That’s how they get clients to bring their pets in for checkups, and they assume it’s the only way to get those pets in there. But there is another way to encourage vet visits, and it is to keep pets healthy.

    It’s a shift from the “disease model” the traditional vet community uses, to a wellness model that helps owners understand the importance of creating vitality and wellness so their pets can live in good health into old age.

    In my view, that kind of shift takes a lot of education. Dr. Royal agrees.

    She explained that clients accustomed to the Western medicine model have a hard time believing alternative treatments can often halt or reverse a disease process in their pet. They’ve accepted the idea that their dog just has chronic ear infections or their cat just throws up a lot, but in holistically-oriented vet practices, we don’t accept health imbalances as “normal.” We deal with them by identifying the root cause and working to resolve it.

    Dr. Royal explained that once animals have a foundation of good health established, they can come in for annual exams and their owners will end up spending much less money than they would with a traditional vet practice. According to veterinary insurance statistics, the average pet has 6 to 8 vet visits per year. That’s quite a high number. And from the perspective of holistic vets, it almost always means the DVM is treating symptoms of disease rather than creating wellness.

    The Value of a Proactive Approach

    Holistic and integrative vets aren’t fighting fires all the time like many traditional vets who wait for disease to occur. Our approach is proactive and focused on maintaining health. The goal of proactive wellness medicine is to create healthy, resilient animals whose bodies are able to handle the pathogens they encounter.

    Nature creates most animal bodies with the capacity to heal themselves. Holistic medicine works with that natural healing ability; Western medicine most often works against it.

    In Dr. Royal’s opinion, the Western medicine approach has created an appalling state of health for pets across the country – obesity, diabetes, Cushing’s disease, chronic allergies, seizures, arthritis, and more. We’ve come to accept as “normal” that most 8 year-old large breed dogs are severely arthritic. But that’s not normal – we’ve created the problem through mismanagement of the health of animals.

    We’ve created all kinds of degenerative diseases, not to mention cancer.

    Dr. Royal and I agree the amount of pet cancer we’re seeing, coupled with the limitations of treatment and the poor prognosis many animals have even with treatment, could be one thing that encourages more traditional veterinarians in the direction of alternative medicine.

    The vast majority of vets are wonderful people who truly want to help their patients. They are disheartened and frustrated when they can’t. As the number of cancer cases continues to increase, it’s possible more traditional vets will open their minds to the idea of creating health vs. treating disease. As a profession we need to take a closer look at what we’re doing that could be causing the diseases we see so often in today’s pets.

    Rather than accepting as “normal” that 25 percent of all pets will get cancer, or 50 percent will be obese, we need to take a step back and question why this is happening.

    Why are animals in the wild not suffering the same types of disorders pets and captive animals deal with? What’s different about their lifestyles? What factors are contributing to illness in animals dependent on people vs. animals dependent on their natural instincts to survive?

    And organizations like the AHVMA Foundation can help promote the notion that “No, this level of illness in animals is anything BUT normal.” These trends can be reversed. There are tools available. Holistic and integrative practitioners use them everyday in their practices.

    Pet owners not content to accept the new “normal” can also motivate traditional vets to pursue alternative therapies with greater interest.

    How to Help Support the Efforts of the Foundation

    I asked Dr. Royal where people can go who are interested in getting involved with the AHVMA Foundation.

    She refers everyone to the website at foundation.ahvma.org. The site is still under construction in some areas, but there are several ways to donate, including making a gift toward a specific research area. You can also read inspiring stories about pets who’ve been helped by integrative veterinary medicine. And the foundation would love you to submit your story. Simply write it up and send it to them with a letter from your veterinarian supporting the facts.

    The AHVMA Foundation is the only entity of its kind, in that it is a national organization supporting unbiased integrative veterinary medicine, and finding funding for research into the theory and practice of complementary and alternative medicine.

    As we discussed earlier, part of the work of the foundation has been to help veterinary students interested in holistic medicine further their studies in CAVM so they have a more integrative educational foundation by the time they graduate.

    It would be wonderful if one day every vet student, in addition to working through an ophthalmology rotation, a cardiology rotation, etc., would also have the opportunity to work through an integrative medicine rotation.

    What the foundation needs to get the ball rolling is a big infusion of initial funding. After that, financial support becomes self-perpetuating because the research and educational programs that result touch so many lives.

    Right now the only way most vet students in the U.S. can acquire integrative medicine training is to attend AHVMA conferences. The conferences, which are partly funded by the foundation, are fabulous tools, but the foundation’s larger mission must be to get CAVM training into veterinary schools across the country.

    I’d like to thank Dr. Barbara Royal, founding member of the AHVMA Foundation, for joining me today. I look forward to collaborating with her in the future.

    You Can Make a Difference

    I’m tremendously excited to announce that now through July 2, 2012, all donations will be automatically doubled. That’s right! For every $1 donated, MercolaHealthyPets.com will donate an additional $2. So please, take a moment right now to make a donation to the AHVMA Foundation.

    Donate Today!

    Video:  Blue Turns Sweet 16

    Blue, a Sheltie/Blue Heeler mix, lived well past the 30 days she was given after being diagnosed with a terminal illness. Blue’s owners attribute her longevity and quality of life to holistic veterinary care.

    June 29, 2012 Posted by | animals, Holistic Pet Health, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

    London 2012 Olympics: Mitt Romney’s wife’s horse Rafalca heading for Games

    The Republican candidate to become the next American president, Mitt Romney, will be heading to the London Olympics to watch the opening ceremony – and he has a special interest in the Games now, after his wife’s horse earned a berth on the US dressage team.

    London 2012 Olympics: Mitt Romney’s wife’s horse Rafalca heading for Games

    London 2012 Olympics: Mitt Romney's wife's horse Rafalca and tutor Jan Ebeling qualify for Games in US dressage team

    Going to the Games: Mitt Romney and wife Ann have a special interest in the Olympics after Rafalca, Mrs. Romney’s horse, qualified for the dressage team Photo: GETTY IMAGES

    Jan Ebeling, Ann Romney’s riding tutor, and his horse Rafalca, which she co-owns qualified for next month’s Olympics on Saturday.

    The 53-year-old Ebeling has been close to Games selection a decade, but his first Olympics will be in London after a third-place finish at the United States Equestrian Team Foundation headquarters in Gladstone, Florida.

    While Romney was continuing his campaign to defeat President Barack Obama on a bus tour of swing states, his wife watched the dressage action from a VIP tent as Ebeling managed to impress in his run with Rafalca.

    “I only looked at the scoreboard one time, and it looked good, and I thought, don’t look again,” Ebeling, who entered the four-day competition ranked ninth in the United States, said.

    Ann Romney has proved a deep-pocketed dressage patron, and thanks to her husband being in the public eye, she has single-handedly gained the sport more attention than it has ever received in America, in spite of celebrating its centenary in the Olympics.

    Both Romneys have said that they will be attending the opening ceremony, and perhaps they will now find a way to buy some dressage tickets, too.

    AnnDRomney Ann Romney It’s great to be part of the Olympics again. We are so proud of Jan and Team USA. Now let’s bring home the gold! http://t.co/wArZ7mAsAbout one week ago via web FavoriteRetweet Reply`

    http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/thevillagesdailysun.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/e0/0e07aaf8-b059-11e1-af05-0019bb2963f4/4fd02e27aa6a2.image.jpg

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    June 27, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet and Animal Training, Pet Events | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

    Decide what type of pet is best suited for your family’s personality and lifestyle

     

    domestic-pet-grp2

    Choose the right pet for you and your family

    1. Dogs require more attention, time and energy than cats do, so if you don’t enjoy walks or hikes in the outdoors, or can’t imagine getting up on cold winter mornings to take your pet out to potty, a cat may be more your style.

    Breed characteristics differ, so if you’re looking for a lapdog, you should look into a less-active breed. If you or other members of your family are very active outdoors and plan to bring a pet along, a hardier, more active breed is a better fit.

    Some pets require daily brushing and grooming, others don’t require nearly as much.

    Your chances of having a long-lasting wonderful relationship with a pet increase dramatically when you give serious thought to the type of animal that best suits you, and choose accordingly.

    Train your dog for a lifetime of obedience

    2.  Behavior problems are the number one reason dogs are relinquished to animal shelters, the number one reason they don’t find new forever homes, and as a result, the number one reason dogs are euthanized.

    From the day you bring your puppy or adult dog home, you should begin teaching her commands such as come, sit, stay, and down. A puppy should begin formal training at eight weeks, and if you adopt an adult dog that has received no obedience training, you should enroll her in a class right away.

    It’s also good idea to take your dog through a refresher course every few years, or when you need help with the inevitable behavioral glitch that will pop up as she ages.

    Apply house rules consistently

    3. As I discussed in my video What You Need to Know Before Bringing Home a New Pet, it’s very important for each member of the family to be on the same page when it comes to what your pet is and isn’t allowed to do in your home.

    If one family member lets the dog bark at outside noises, but another family member corrects the behavior, you confuse the dog. If you don’t mind the kitty drinking from the bathroom sink but your husband does, decide which way it’s going to be and stick with it.
    When your pet knows what to expect from his behavior, he will be much more inclined to do more of what you approve of and less of what you don’t.

    Limit treats to training rewards

    4. This is an excellent way to make sure your dog views treats as special rather than expected. It’s also helpful in keeping your pet from becoming overweight or obese.

    Feed a species-appropriate diet, and partner with a holistic or integrative vet to maintain your pet’s well-being.

    Socialize your pet

    5. This is especially important for puppies. Again — behavior problems are the number one reason dogs don’t stay with their families and don’t get adopted by new families.

    Lack of proper socialization can result in inappropriate fears, aggressive behavior, general timidity, and a host of other behavior problems that are difficult to extinguish once a dog is mature.

    The ideal time for socialization is between three and 12 weeks for dogs; between two and eight weeks for cats.

    Help your pet be as active as nature intended

    6. Exercise and play time are necessary for your pet’s mental and physical well-being. If you don’t give your dog opportunities to be physically active, or if you don’t encourage exercise for your kitty and find ways to make it happen, you may well end up with a bored, destructive, overweight pet whose health will spiral downward throughout her lifetime.

    Find ways to enrich your pet’s environment

    7. Your dog or cat needs your help to stay mentally stimulated. This is important not only to discourage destructive behavior in younger pets, but also to keep your older pet’s brain sharp.

    Make sure your pet is in good company

    8. Pets get lonely and depressed just like people do when they spend too much time alone. Cats are generally better on their own, but dogs and especially puppies don’t do well left to their own devices for extended periods of time.

    If you’re regularly away from home 10 or 12 hours a day or you travel out of town weekly for work, a dog might not be the best choice for a pet. If you already have a dog and find yourself away from home for extended periods, make arrangements with a friendly neighbor, relative, dog-sitter or a pet daycare center to give your pup the time and attention you’re not able to.

    Keep a pet-friendly home

    9. Keep a pet-friendly home. Your dog or cat is a part of the family. If she’s a kitty, she needs her own litter box in a quiet, out-of-the way corner, a scratching post or tree, her own toys, and a nice cozy spot for napping.
    Your dog needs his own cozy spot as well, preferably a crate, a comfy bed that’s his alone and a selection of appropriate toys.

    Understand that in households with pets, accidents will happen. Have the right cleaning supplies on hand, and learn the best techniques for removing pet stains.

    Help your pet be the best pet he can be

    10. Train your pet by setting him up to succeed. There’s a reason for everything your dog or cat does, and the reason rarely if ever involves being deliberately disobedient.

    You should never physically punish your pet. It brings the animal pain and fear, and it gains you nothing. It’s a lose-lose situation. Please don’t do it.

    Your job as a mistake-proof pet parent is to figure out the reason behind the behavior, learn how to encourage what you want to see more of and how to discourage inappropriate behavior.

    With dogs, this usually involves additional training or behavior modification. With kitties, it involves arranging your environment to discourage behavior you want to extinguish.

    Dr. Becker

      June 27, 2012 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, animal behavior, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , | Leave a comment

      Riding as Therapy

      True Health Is True Wealth:

      Equine therapy is catching on as a fun and helpful activity for many MS patients.

      One to three times a week a growing group of MS patients across the country saddle up to relieve some of their symptoms and to boost their self-esteem. Equine therapy is used to treat a variety of diseases and disorders besides MS, including mental illness, cerebral palsy, and brain injury. According to the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association Inc. (NARHA) in Denver, Colorado, more than 26,000 riders with disabilities benefit from therapeutic horseback riding activities at NARHA centers.

      Hippotherapy, which means "treatment with the help of a horse," has been widely practiced in this country since the 1960′s. In 1952 at the Helsinki Olympic Games, Liz Hartel of Denmark garnered the silver medal for dressage (The execution by a trained horse of complex movements in response to barely perceptible signals from its rider.) despite being paralyzed from polio. Her victory helped focus the world on using horses to improve the health of those with various disabilities. As the experts investigated various ways for horses to help patients, they found that not all people can be aided in the same way.

      "Hippotherapy is using the horse strictly as a modality for therapy, where the riders are not influencing the horse at all," explains Occupational Therapist Erin Hurley, director of the Unicorn Handicapped Riding Association in Medford, NJ. "Equestrian therapy is more of a global term. It combines therapy and recreation. That’s what most people with MS do. I think they get more out of it if they are an active partner in the process."

      According to the NARHA, research shows that all therapeutic riding participants can experience physical, emotional, and mental rewards. Because horseback riding gently and rhythmically moves the rider’s body in a manner similar to a human gait, riders with physical disabilities often show improvement in flexibility, balance, and muscle strength. For those with mental or emotional problems, the unique relationship formed with the horse can lead to boosted confidence, patience, and self-esteem. All who ride also receive the benefit of a special sense of independence which comes from riding.

      Equine therapy can provide certain benefits to MS patients. "The benefits from the therapy depend on the disability. With MS, it’s a physical disability in which case there are a lot of different benefits. For example, if you have an MS patient in a wheelchair, he (or she) is not getting a lot of stimulation to the spine," Ms. Hurley says. "The horse’s movement stimulates the human movement in the way the horse walks. If you’re sitting on the horse’s back, you’re getting those benefits of side to side movement and rotation movement each time the horse steps forward. Just the sensory input helps to stimulate the muscles in different ways. At the other end of the spectrum with spascity, equestrian therapy helps to loosen tight muscles especially through the hip area, lower extremities, and through the trunk."

      The MS patients who ride at Ms. Hurley’s center come either once or twice a week. They ride for 30 minutes with the help of two side walkers, a person who leads the horse, and an instructor. By having the four people work alongside the rider, safety is ensured. Since these helpers are trained to work with MS patients who have weakness and balance problems, no one should be afraid to give horse therapy a try, say the experts.

      "Each person works on different goals as we walk through the woods or inside our indoor arena depending on the weather," she says. "One woman with MS who started with us this year was having trouble walking. After a ride she says she can walk much better."

      The experts and MS patients say that equestrian therapy offers much more to MS patients then symptom relief. "It raises their self-esteem and gives them something to do for recreation. They love it and really look forward to it," says Ms. Hurley.

      Just getting out in the fresh air and doing something physical can do wonders for MS patients say the experts. "One of the most frustrating aspects of chronic illness or disability is the effect it has on leisure-time activities. Just when a person would benefit most from the relaxation, enjoyment, and socialization that come from recreation, he is limited in what he can do. It is important, however, despite what limitations may exist, to maintain existing or find new interests," write Dr. Robert Shuman and Dr. Janice Schwartz in their book, Understanding Multiple Sclerosis: A Handbook for Families (Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1988). "There is a network of horseback riding programs for the physically challenged. Many people with MS find that riding builds back abdominal muscles, strengthens weak legs, and is a terrific source of self-confidence."

      "Don’t defy the diagnosis, try to defy the verdict." - Norman Cousins

      For Rita McGinley, 44, of Westmont, NJ, equestrian therapy helped many of her symptoms and also raised her spirits. She rode every week for about a year at the Pegasus Riding Academy in Philadelphia. Diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS four years ago, the registered nurse was forced to quit her job and later counseled patients at MSAA headquarters in Cherry Hill. Now undergoing intense physical therapy, she plans to return to equestrian therapy at the end of her current regimen. "It is so enjoyable. I ride bareback where there’s just a blanket between me and the horse. I feel every movement of those four hooves, and I can feel the muscles in my pelvic floor moving. I have problems with my bladder, and after I ride I can feel much improvement," she says. "It’s also great for strengthening and balance. There’s a general feeling of well-being on a horse and that another living being is helping me. I love it."

      Members of the Montville, NJ MS Support Group have saddled up for a therapeutic ride at the Handicapped Riding Center at West Orange, NJ, part of the Montclair Riding Academy, for the past nine years. Dedicated to the development of horseback riding as a therapeutic, recreational, and social activity for people with disabilities, the academy hosts these MS patients every Wednesday morning at its gorgeous grounds.

      "We really don’t know how it works. But from talking with different people, it seems that the horse helps them to move some of their muscles that they cannot move on their own. Most of the people with MS who come here think they are getting some benefit out of it. Some people insist on riding bareback so they have closer contact with the horse, but most people use the western saddle because it’s safer and easier to use," says John Sinico, a spokesperson for center. "They love it. They swear by it. They also tell us that mentally it’s a nice relief from their everyday worries. Instead of sitting home and feeling sorry for themselves they are out doing something. It’s active, not passive. All in all, it’s very beneficial."

      Montville MS Support Group Leader Tom Hinkey says that some of the group members receive some relief from their spascity through riding, but they all get emotional benefits from it. By getting out and socializing and focusing on the horse, he says, they can forget about their problems and enjoy the day.

      "If you don’t have a fear of horses, it can probably help some of your symptoms. It’s a lot of fun," says Ms. McGinley. "Whenever I rode, I would come home with a ‘horse healthy high.’ I miss it and can’t wait to do it again once my current physical therapy is over."
      - Christine Norris

      PROMOTING A SAFE RIDE

      The North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA) was founded in 1969 to promote and support therapeutic horseback riding programs throughout the U.S. and Canada. Comprised of more than 500 riding centers, the NARHA helps ensure safe instruction by administering a certification program for riding instructors. NARHA also offers an accreditation program to riding centers to promote excellence in providing therapeutically-valid services. The association provides riding centers with guidelines for selecting riders who are suitable and appropriate for therapeutic riding activities.

      Multiple Sclerosis-Afflicted Neil Cavuto Slams MSNBC’s Attacks on Ann Romney: ‘Horse’s Asses’…

      Uneducated Slander:

      Earlier this week MSNBC’s continuous string of near slander against Mitt Romney has just spawned yet another aggressive bit of push-back, this time from Neil Cavuto of Fox News. You may recall that MSNBC anchor Lawrence O‘Donnell recently slammed Mitt Romney’s wife, Ann Romney, for claiming that she participates in the sport of dressage as therapy for her multiple sclerosis. According to O’Donnell, “There are a lot of things you can do to try to deal with MS. But come on, dressage does not appear in any of the more traditional courses of treatment.”

      Turns out that that assertion is breathtakingly wrong, as Cavuto pointed out while citing multiple clinical organizations that treat multiple sclerosis and consider horse therapy a very traditional, and often very effective form of therapy. Watch his takedown here:

      Cavuto Video to MsNBC: “Lean Forward – Bend Over! You… ‘Horses Asses’…

      As you can plainly see, Cavuto doesn’t pull punches in this clip. “You’ve got a disease in your name – maybe you should stop calling names,” he starts the segment.

      He then proceeds to go right for the jugular, while still remaining preternaturally calm, calling MSNBC a collection of “horse’s asses“ and slamming them as ”condescending, sanctimonious“ people with ”incredible ignorance” of multiple sclerosis treatments. He then points out that the horse riding therapy – known as “hippotherapy,” according to Cavuto – is used to treat walking conditions associated with multiple sclerosis. Quoting from the “industry bible” on neurology, Cavuto says straight out that “this is a legitimate therapy.”

      Cavuto’s stern correction only serves to confirm the generally low opinion of MSNBC which is beginning to percolate amongst the rest of the media. Glenn Beck, for instance, hammered the network over its smear tactics on his radio show today after savaging their most recent factual errors:

      “You have no credibility at all,” Beck thundered. “The ratings are going to tank on MSNBC, because Americans are fair.”

      On a side note, setting aside the numerous factual errors on the network, Cavuto‘s takedown misses a blistering example of hypocrisy on the part of Lawrence O’Donnell. To complain about how particular therapies don’t appear on the “traditional” list, when the Left has pushed for numerous untested medical ideas, such as embryonic stem cell research and assisted suicide. Neither of these is in any way “traditional,” and O’Donnell is not on record opposing either of them, so why the selectiveness?

      Hear and see Beck radio takedown of MSNBC video to fit their agenda: Here

      http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/thevillagesdailysun.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/e0/0e07aaf8-b059-11e1-af05-0019bb2963f4/4fd02e27aa6a2.image.jpg

      "If they (the liberal bias media) is that egregious at lying on that issue, what else are they lying about?"

      Dim Bulb: Lawrence O’Donnell | WashingtonExaminer.com

      Ann Romney’s Horse Comes in Third in Olympic Qualifying Event …

      London 2012 Olympics: Mitt Romney’s wife’s horse Rafalca heading for Games

      What is Therapeutic Riding?

      To learn more about therapeutic riding or for a list of centers in your area, contact NAHRA at:

      PO Box 33150
      Denver, CO 80233

      (800) 369-7433

      (303) 452-1212

      You may also visit NARHA on the world wide web at: http://www.NARHA.org.

      June 24, 2012 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Friendship and Love | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

      If Your Dog is Itchy or Your Cat is Wheezy, You Need to Read This

      Story at-a-glance
      • According to a recent survey, over half of pet owners aren’t aware their dog or cat can also be miserable with seasonal allergies in the spring and summer months.
      • Allergies are extremely common in today’s cats and dogs, and take the form of either food or environmental allergies, including seasonal allergies. Some unlucky pets develop allergies in both categories.
      • Symptoms of seasonal allergies in dogs and cats are most frequently skin-related and include itchiness, inflammation, and hot spots. Allergic animals can also have ear problems and respiratory issues.
      • Seasonal allergies can turn into a year-round problem if steps aren’t taken to prevent exposure, aggressively manage symptoms, and insure your pet’s immune system is strong and resilient.
      • There are many things you as a pet owner can do to help diminish the effects of your pet’s allergic condition.

      By Dr. Becker

      Did you know your dog or cat can suffer from seasonal allergies just as you do?

      According to a survey conducted by Novartis Animal Health, over half of pet owners aren’t aware their fuzzy family members can also spend the spring season feeling miserable thanks to pollens and other environmental allergens.

      Two Categories of Pet Allergies

      There are primarily two types of allergies: food allergies and environmental allergies. If your pet gets itchy during spring, summer or fall, she’s probably reacting to seasonal, environmental allergens. But if her symptoms continue year-round, it’s more likely her sensitivity is to something more constant in her environment, or to something in her diet.

      There are a couple of exceptions to this rule, however. If you live in an area that doesn’t have a hard freeze in the winter, environmental allergens can build up and cause year-round issues for your pet. In addition, seasonal allergies can progress to year-round allergies, which I’ll discuss shortly.

      Signs Your Pet Has Seasonal Allergies

      Unlike humans whose allergy symptoms usually involve the respiratory tract, allergies in dogs and cats more often take the form of skin irritation or inflammation – a condition called allergic dermatitis.

      If your pet has allergies, her skill will become very itchy. She’ll start scratching excessively, and might bite or chew at certain areas of her body. She may rub herself against vertical surfaces like furniture, or she may rub her face against the carpet. She’s trying to relieve the miserable itchiness by any means possible.

      As the itch-scratch cycle continues, her skin will become inflamed and tender to the touch. Other signs of allergic dermatitis include areas of hair loss, open sores on the skin, and scabbing.

      Hot spots can develop as well in dogs (hot spots are rarely seen in cats). A hot spot is inflamed, infected skin that occurs when your dog’s natural bacteria overwhelms an area of his skin. Typically the skin will be very red, and often there is bleeding and hair loss.

      Other Signs to Watch For

      Pets with allergies also often have problems with their ears – especially dogs. The ear canals may be itchy and inflamed as part of a generalized allergic response, or they may grow infected with yeast or bacteria.

      Signs your pet’s ears are giving him problems include scratching at the ears, head shaking, and hair loss around the ears. If infection is present there will often be odor and a discharge from the ears.

      While respiratory symptoms aren’t common in pets with allergies, they do occur. A running nose, watery eyes, coughing and sneezing are typical allergic symptoms in both two- and four-legged allergy sufferers.

      Typically pets with seasonal allergies to ragweed, grasses, pollens, molds and trees, also develop sensitivity to other allergens inhaled through the nose and mouth. Animals with weaknesses in their lung fields can develop sinusitis and bronchitis, just as people do.

      Another sign to watch for if you suspect your pet has allergies is generalized redness. Allergic pets often have puffy red eyes, red oral tissue, a red chin, red paws and even a red anus.

      How Seasonal Allergies Can Turn Into Year-Round Allergies

      Allergic reactions are produced by your pet’s immune system, and the way his immune system functions is a result of both nature (his genetics) and nurture (his environment).

      I often see the following history with allergic pets who visit my practice:

      • A young pup or kitten, maybe 4 to 6 months old, begins with a little red tummy, itchy ears, and maybe a mild infection in one ear. His regular vet treats the pup symptomatically to provide him some relief.
      • The following year as soon as the weather warms up, the pet is brought back to his regular vet with very itchy feet, another ear infection, and a hotspot or two. Again, the vet treats the symptoms (hopefully not with steroids) until the weather turns cold and the symptoms disappear.
      • Year three, the same pet suffers from May through September with red, inflamed skin, maybe some hair loss, more hotspots, frequent ear and skin infections, and a tendency to chew his paws or scratch until he bleeds.
      • By year five, all the symptoms have grown significantly worse and the animal’s suffering is now year-round.

      This is what usually happens with seasonal environmental allergies. The more your pet is exposed to the allergens he’s sensitive to, the more intense and long-lasting his allergic response becomes.

      With my regular patients (those who start out life as patients of my practice), I begin addressing potential root causes at the first sign of an allergic response, which is usually around six months of age. I do this to reduce the risk of an escalating response year after year.

      Helping a Pet with Seasonal Allergies

      Since the allergen load your environmentally sensitive pet is most susceptible to is much heavier outdoors, two essential steps in managing her condition are regular foot soaks and baths during the warmer months when all those triggers are in bloom.

      Dermatologists recommend this common sense approach for human allergy sufferers. If you have hypersensitivities, your doctor will tell you to shower at night and in the morning to remove allergens from the surface of your body. I recommend you do the same for your dog or cat.

      • Frequent baths give complete, immediate relief to an itchy pet and wash away the allergens on the coat and skin. Make sure to use a grain free (oatmeal free) shampoo.
      • Foot soaks are also a great way to reduce the amount of allergens your pet tracks into the house and spreads all over her indoor environment.
      • Keep the areas of your home where your pet spends most of her time as allergen-free as possible. Vacuum and clean floors and pet bedding frequently using simple, non-toxic cleaning agents rather than household cleaners containing chemicals.
      • Because allergies are an immune system response, it’s important to keep your pet’s immune function optimal. This means avoiding unnecessary vaccinations and drugs. And I do not recommend you vaccinate your pet during a systemic inflammatory response. Vaccines stimulate the immune system, which is the last thing your pet with seasonal environmental allergies needs. Talk to your holistic vet about titers to measure your pet’s immunity to core diseases as an alternative to automatically vaccinating.
      • If you haven’t already, move your pet to an anti-inflammatory diet. Foods that create or worsen inflammation are high in carbohydrates. Your allergic pet’s diet should be very low in grain content.
      • Research has shown that ‘leaky gut,’ or dysbiosis, is a root cause of immune system overreactions, so addressing this issue with a holistic vet is an important aspect of reducing allergic reactions over time.

      Allergy-Fighting Supplements

      Quercetin. Quercetin is a bioflavonoid with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. I call it ‘nature’s Benadryl’ because it does a great job suppressing histamine release from mast cells and basophiles.

      Histamine is what causes much of the inflammation, redness and irritation characteristic of an allergic response. By turning off histamine production with a quercetin supplement, we can suppress or at least moderate the effects of inflammation.

      Quercetin also has some other wonderful properties. It inhibits 5-lipooxygenase, an enzyme that upregulates the inflammatory cascade. Quercetin inhibits the production of leukotrienes, another way the body creates inflammation, thereby decreasing the level of bronchoconstriction. Bronchoconstriction occurs in the lung fields as a symptom of asthma. Quercetin can actually suppress how much constriction occurs.

      Bromelain and papain. Bromelain and papain are proteolytic enzymes that increase the absorption of quercetin, making it work more effectively. They also suppress histamine production.

      One of the reasons I use quercetin, bromelain and papain together is they also suppress prostaglandin release. Prostaglandins are another pathway by which inflammation can occur. By suppressing prostaglandins, we can decrease the pain and inflammation associated with irritated mucous membranes and body parts. Using the three substances in combination provides some natural pain and inflammation control.

      Omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids help decrease inflammation throughout the body. Adding them into the diet of all pets — particularly pets struggling with seasonal environmental allergies – is very beneficial. The best sources of omega 3s are krill oil, salmon oil, tuna oil, anchovy oil and other fish body oils.

      Coconut oil. I also recommend coconut oil for allergic pets. Coconut oil contains lauric acid, which helps decrease the production of yeast. Using a fish body oil with coconut oil before inflammation flares up in your pet’s body can help moderate or even suppress the inflammatory response.

      Advanced Allergy Therapy (AAT) for pets

      Many holistic vets have added AAT to there medical bag.  Advanced Allergy Therapeutics (AAT) is a non-invasive treatment that provides fast, long-term relief from the many symptoms associated with allergies and sensitivities, used for humans as well as animals.

      Related:

      Allergies and Springtime Ailments in Pets

      Free Homemade Dog Food Recipes

      June 22, 2012 Posted by | Animal Related Education, animals, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets | , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

      Summer Fun With the Dogs

      Summer is here… and so is the fun!

      Walking Around Horse Thief Lake

      Weenies Sunning on the Deck 08.09.11

      Is This Like School

      Good Spots 3

      OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

      Walking Around Horse Thief Lake 3

      June 21, 2012 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Dogs, Just One More Pet, pet fun, Pets | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

      School of deep-sea diving: Breathtaking underwater photos capture exotic marine life in remote parts of the world

      The Daily Mail –  – By Emma Reynolds – h/t to Patricia Gillenwater

      Daring diver in his 60s goes to remote parts of the world to take beautiful pictures by a marine life photographer in the wildest parts of the planet.

      David Doubilet’s awe-inspiring images were taken in far-flung parts of the Antarctic and around exotic islands.

      The vibrant photographs range from cute Australian sea lions peering inquisitively into the lens to a terrifying Great White Shark opening its jaws in South Africa.

      Sea life through a lens: An Australian sea lion peers playfully into the camera off Hopkins Island South Australia

      Sea life through a lens: An Australian sea lion peers playfully into the camera off Hopkins Island South Australia

      I said, no pictures! A great white shark makes a less friendly subject as it tries to bite the camera in Gansbaai, South Africa

      I said, no pictures! A great white shark makes a less friendly subject as it tries to bite the camera in Gansbaai, South Africa

      Even a black and white scene is utterly beautiful, showing a group of southern stingrays floating above the seabed of the Cayman Islands with sun rays falling from above.

       

      Another fascinating photo shows a chance encounter between a parrot fish and a school of grey grunts in Galapagos.

      Intrepid Mr Doubilet is now in his mid-60s but remains unafraid to come face-to-face with predators of the deep.

      He has also enlisted fellow adventurers to appear in his photos, with one showing diver Dinah Halstead surrounded by a circle of barracuda in Papua New Guinea.

      Happy feet: Chinstrap penguins survey their surroundings from the top of a 'bergy bit', or small ice floe, off Danko Island in the Antarctic Peninsula

      Happy feet: Chinstrap penguins survey their surroundings from the top of a ‘bergy bit’, or small ice floe, off Danko Island in the Antarctic Peninsula

      In the spotlight: Barracuda encircle daredevil diver Dinah Halstead as intrepid photographr David Doubilet captures the moment in the clear waters of Papua New Guinea

      In the spotlight: Barracuda encircle daredevil diver Dinah Halstead as intrepid photographr David Doubilet captures the moment in the clear waters of Papua New Guinea

      Shimmering surface: A Papuan fisherman stands in his wooden outrigger above schools of flashing baitfish in Raja Ampat, Indonesia

      Shimmering surface: A Papuan fisherman stands in his wooden outrigger above schools of flashing baitfish in Raja Ampat, Indonesia

      chromodoris nudibranch raising its mantle to detect its environment

      Spine cheeked anemone premnas biaculeatus in bleached anemone entacmaea quadricolor from Milne Bay Papua New Guinea

      Vibrant characters: A chromodoris nudibranch raises its mantle to detect its environment in a white studio, while a spine cheeked clownfish nestles in bleached anemone in a more natural setting of Milne Bay, Papua New Guinea

      All smiles: A parrotfish seems to grin in its sleep near Heron Island, Great barrier Reef

      All smiles: A parrotfish seems to grin in its sleep near Heron Island, Great barrier Reef

      Sad face: The talented photographer picks out incredible detail in this close-up of a funny-looking shortnose batfish, or Ogcocephalus nasutus

      Sad face: The talented photographer picks out incredible detail in this close-up of a funny-looking shortnose batfish, or Ogcocephalus nasutus

      He said: ‘People forget that there are more humans that eat sharks than sharks that eat humans and in some areas the shark population is down by 90 per cent.

      ‘For example in China they eat shark soup as a way of proving wealth and success.’

      The New York photographer has spent hundreds of hours travelling the world to see the ever more intriguing secrets of the ocean.

      He is one of the greatest underwater photographers in the world, and his work in both fresh and salt water has been elevated to new heights with the advent of the digital age.

      Between sea and sky: A southern stingray glides across the waved raked sands of North Sound bay, Grand Cayman island

      Between sea and sky: A southern stingray glides across the waved raked sands of North Sound bay, Grand Cayman island

      Light and shade: The beautiful pictures have great impact, even in black and white

      Light and shade: The beautiful pictures have great impact, even in black and white

      Maori (humphead) wrasse Chelinus undulatus at Opal Reef Great Barrier Reef Australia

      A male tomato clownfish gaurds his clutch of developing eggs, Anilao, Philippines. The eggs hatch in one week and are well tended and fiercely guarded by the male parent

      Fish-eye: A Maori humphead wrasse at Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, left, and a male tomato clownfish, right, guarding his clutch of eggs – which hatch in a week

      Amazing aerial view: A De Havilland Beaver Biplane delivers scuba divers to Hook and Hardy Reef on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

      Amazing aerial view: A De Havilland Beaver Biplane delivers scuba divers to Hook and Hardy Reef on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

      Vast and blue: A red Waco biplane over Key West and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary - the birth place of the Gulf Stream

      Vast and blue: A red Waco biplane over Key West and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary – the birth place of the Gulf Stream

      He said: ‘That Cartier-Bresson moment that is hard to achieve on land is 10 times harder to achieve underwater, because you’re swimming around with a large housing with arms as long as 24 inches long and attached to the end of the arms are your strobes.

      ‘Sometimes you’re using six or seven strobes or large surface-powered HMI movie lights.’

      One picture shows a male tomato clownfish guarding his clutch of developing eggs in the Philippines, while another captures a weedy sea dragon patrolling a Tasmanian kelp forest.

      Mr Doubilet said: ‘There are always moments that are dangerous. I wouldn’t say I have ever been scared as such but I can’t deny I have certainly put myself in many dangerous situations.

      Unearthly imagery: A weedy sea dragon, Phyllopteryx taeniolatus, patrols a kelp forest at Waterfall Bay, Tasmania, Australia

      Unearthly imagery: A weedy sea dragon, Phyllopteryx taeniolatus, patrols a kelp forest at Waterfall Bay, Tasmania, Australia

      Green menace: A baby Nile crocodile hides in a veil of algae in the Ncamasere Channel of the Pan handle region of the Okavango Delta, Botswana, Africa

      Green menace: A baby Nile crocodile hides in a veil of algae in the Ncamasere Channel of the Pan handle region of the Okavango Delta, Botswana, Africa

      Nice to sea you: A parrot fish confronts a school of grey grunts in the Galapagos Islands

      Nice to sea you: A parrot fish confronts a school of grey grunts in the Galapagos Islands

      ‘One that sticks in my head is when we were doing night dives in a river in Okavango Deta, northern Botswana.

      ‘The water was full of crocodiles and hippos and because they follow sound and movement we couldn’t go back to shoot in the same place twice.

      ‘There was a mother and baby hippo close by and they can be very defensive in that situation. Not to mention the crocodile eyes glowing all around us.

      ‘Being faced with something like that is much more intimidating than a shark.’

      Hidden world: A stack of mating loggerhead turtles in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Key Largo Florida

      Hidden world: A stack of mating loggerhead turtles in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Key Largo Florida

      Picturesque: Australian sea lions play in a sea grass meadow off Hopkins Island, South Australia

      Picturesque: Australian sea lions play in a sea grass meadow off Hopkins Island, South Australia

      June 20, 2012 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, animals, Just One More Pet, Wild Animals | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

      Daring Mouse Likes to Cuddle

      Video:  Daring Mouse Likes to Cuddle

      Watch this adorable little mouse cuddle with a sleeping cat!

      h/t to Dr. Becker

      June 19, 2012 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, animals, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, On The Lighter Side, Pet Friendship and Love, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , | Leave a comment

      Happy Father’s Day From the Pets…

      “As a Father’s Day treat, we put aside our sibling rivalry and found something we both like to do. Can we borrow the keys”

      Hmmm… Now the 4-legged kids want the keys too?!?

      Wishing you all a Happy Father’s Day!!

      June 17, 2012 Posted by | Animal and Pet Photos, Holidays With Pets, Just One More Pet, pet fun, Pets, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , | Leave a comment

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