JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

A Public Service Announcement —– Do not leave your dog unattended ever!

Do not leave your dog… your pets outside or in vehicles in this heat ever!!!

In light of reading multiple reports of dogs dying (slowly cooked from the inside out) by being left unattended in cars here is a public service announcements for all you mentally challenged and cruel morons… DON’T TAKE YOUR DOG (OR ANY OTHER LIVING CREATURE) WITH YOU IF YOU DON’T INTEND TO STAY RIGHT WITH YOUR DOG.

I don’t even let my dog outside in our big fenced in yard without supervising her, just exactly like you would a toddler.

What is it with people that bring their dogs along in a car and leave them? Are they nuts or just plain mean.

Dogs will even die if left outside too long in the heat God, don’t get a dog or kitty if you’re not going to care for him/her… they are not it’s; they are living beings.

 

 

The body temperature of the animal will increase to the point where it is effectively boiled alive from the inside  – Ch Supt Mike Flynn

Again, god how stupid are people? In just three minutes of googling I’ve seen over a hundred cases of dogs being left to die in the heat………..what in sam hell is going on with humanity?  What happened to common sense and love for our pets?

Don’t just leave your dog, watch them, they are about as intelligent as a two year old child at most – when my kids were two I had to be on them like glue).

I don’t leave my dog alone ever, I know exactly where she is at and what she is doing at all times.

Don’t get a dog if you’re not going to take really good care of him/her.
Boiling to death is a horrible, gruesome way to die.

Video:  Idiots Leave Dogs Unattended in Heat Wave

Source: ATS

Make sure there is plenty of cool water out for them in the house and outside in the shade.

Related:

Cruelty Alert: Pets Suffering from Heatstroke in Parked Cars

Temperatures Are Rising: Be a Dog Defender: Help Save Animals This Summer!  Cool Ideas for Hot Dogs -  Please be proactive and vocal… you could be saving a life and definitely saving animals of a lot of suffering!!

ASPCA’s Pets in Hot Cars flyer (pdf) in her glovebox to give out when appropriate. Please print and distribute these flyers (pdf) in your neighborhood to help educate people about the danger of leaving pets in hot cars.

A hot oven or a hot car... It's the same thing.

Please step up for abused and neglected pets and animals.  Help them and be their voice.  Call the authorities if you suspect a problem.  It is always better to err on the pet’s or animal’s (or child’s) side!  And always call animal services or the police if you see a pet locked in a car and/or out in a yard where it has no access to shade and water!  More animals die from ignorant, neglectful and cruel owners than from diseases!!

Posted by Ask Marion at JOMP – h/t to Jean Stoner

‘Dogs Have The Intelligence of a Human Toddler’

June 29, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, If Animlas Could Talk..., Pet Abuse, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Toughen Animal Abuse Laws and Sentences | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Are they barking mad? Japan’s smallest police dog is a Chihuahua called ‘Momo’

Meet Japan’s smallest police dog – all 6.6 lb of her.

Momo, a seven-year-old Chihuahua, poses during a police dog examination held at Koriyama, western Japan

In what is a world first, a long-haired Chihuahua named ‘Momo’ passed her exams to become a police dog in the western Japanese prefecture of Nara last fall.

The brown-and-white dog was one of 32 successful candidates out of 70 dogs, passing a search and rescue test by finding a person in five minutes after merely sniffing their cap.

‘Any breed of dog can be entered to become a police dog in the search and rescue division,’ said a Nara police spokesman.

But he admitted that news a Chihuahua had been entered may still come as a surprise to many.

‘It’s quite unusual,’ he said.

Television footage showed the seven-year-old Momo bounding across grass or sitting proudly, long hair blowing in the breeze.

Momo will be used for rescue operations in case of disasters such as earthquakes, in the hope that she may be able to squeeze her tiny frame into places too narrow for more usual rescue dogs, which tend to be German Shepherds.

The public response to the news of Momo’s selection took police by surprise, the spokesman said, adding: ‘The phone’s been ringing all afternoon.’

‘It’s quite rare for us to have a Chihuahua work as a police dog,’ the spokeswoman said.

Chihuahuas, named after a Mexican state, are the smallest breed of dog.

‘We would like it to work hard by taking advantage of its small size,’ a Nara police department official told the Sankei Shimbun daily.

Enlarge The brown-and-white Chihuahua, a first for Japan and perhaps the world, was one of 32 successful candidates out of 70 dogs

The brown-and-white Chihuahua, a first for Japan and perhaps the world, was one of 32 successful candidates out of 70 dogs

Enlarge Go get em girl: Momo takes part in a police dog examination, managing to find a person by merely sniffing a cap he had been wearing

Go get em girl: Momo takes part in a police dog examination, managing to find a person by merely sniffing a cap he had been wearing

Source:  The Daily Mail

June 29, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Chihuahua, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet and Animal Training, Service and Military Animals, Unusual Stories | , , , | Leave a comment

US Fisheries Service Announces Plan to Curb Sea Turtle Deaths After 900 Wash Ashore in the Gulf

US Fisheries Service Announces Plan to Curb Sea Turtle Deaths After 900 Wash Ashore in the Gulf

Environmentalists Denounce the Plan as ‘Too Little Too Late” Vowing Court Action
After the lifeless carcasses of over 900 endangered sea turtles have washed up on Gulf beaches from Texas to Florida in the past few months, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has finally decided to consider action,announcing plans today to begin a lengthy process to address the carnage.  This action comes after Turtle Island Restoration Network along with partner conservation groups, notified the agency May 31 of its intent to sue over the government’s failure to protect endangered sea turtles from entanglement and drowning in shrimp trawls.

Click here to download the NMFS plans for EIS scoping.
"With nearly a 1,000 dead sea turtles already washed up on Gulf beaches, NMFS actions to start a multi-month process while the slaughter continues is unconscionable," said Dr. Chris Pincetich of Turtle Island Restoration Network.
“The government knows that turtles die when there is shrimping activity, but they have delayed action for months,” said Carole Allen, Gulf Office Director of Sea Turtle Restoration Project.  “Even as scoping sessions are held, more turtles will die. This is too little, too late for hundreds of sea turtles.”  She continued,  “The government has always known that Turtle Excluder Devices (TEDs) are needed on all types of shrimp trawls,” said Allen. 
Documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act reveal that biologists at the federal agency were aware of the problem, but could not get decision-makers in their agency to act. An internal email between Fisheries biologists stated:

“A defeatist attitude has sunk in with regard to increasing/improving    enforcement efforts and thereby improving TED compliance in the fishery. Basically nothing would be done unless a mandate came down from Dr. Lubchenco stating that this would be an enforcement priority.”

Federal inspectors in Louisiana found only 3of 29 shrimping nets had legal TEDs, and 21 were found with TEDs which “would result in the capture and death of a sea turtle” including several of the escape hatches that were sewn shut. No fines or penalties were assessed by NMFS despite the obvious violations. Click here to download emails and TEDs inspection reports from the FOIA.
All five species of sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico are endangered; yet, virtually no action has been taken to protect them after record numbers of dead turtles have been reported this Spring. The over 900 dead turtles that have washed ashore this year represents nearly 18,000 drowned turtles, according to NMFS’ own formula that assumes only one in 20 dead turtles will wash ashore and are found.

A statement from James Lecky, Director of the NMFS Office of Protected Resources, states that NMFS will evaluate a “range of reasonable alternatives” to reduce sea turtle bycatch and mortality in the shrimp fishery of the southeastern United States.  They will consider requiring all skimmer trawls, pusher-head trawls and butterfly trawls in the Atlantic and Gulf area to use TEDs in both state and federal waters.

"After sea turtles in the Gulf were hammered by the BP oil spill, they need more protection, not less, yet the very agency (NMFS) responsible for their protection has announced a plan designed to cover their butts, instead of taking the obvious action necessary to end the carnage," said Todd Steiner, biologist and executive director of Turtle Island Restoration Network.

"NMFS has a legal obligation to close down shrimping until they can guarantee that they can enforce the law of the land– that every active shrimp net has a properly installed TED.  If they don’t act to stop the massacre immediately, we’ll see them in Court very soon” Pincetich concluded.

###

Turtle Island Restoration Network is an international marine conservation organization with offices in Texas and California whose 35,000 members and online activists work to protect sea turtles and marine biodiversity in the United States and around the world. For more information, visit www.SeaTurtles.org.

Sea Turtle Restoration Project • PO Box 370 • Forest Knolls, CA 94933, USA
Phone: +1 415 663 8590 • Fax: +1 415 663 9534 • info@seaturtles.org

June 28, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Just One More Pet, Political Change, Wild Animals | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Man rescues dogs seen on Fukushima plant’s webcam — TEPCO demands they be returned during “ghoulish and bizarre” conversation

June 27th, 2011 at 12:33 PM

Return our dogs, TEPCO demands, The Australian, June 28, 2011:

The Australian yesterday revealed the story of animal rescue “guerilla” Hiroshi Hoshi’s mission to the plant to grab two Japanese Shiba dogs spotted wandering around on a webcam trained on the facility.

Yesterday, Mr. Hoshi said one of [TEPCO]‘s managers, who called himself Mr Igarashi, made a “ghoulish and bizarre” phone call to him soon after he rescued the dogs, suggesting they had become company property.

“He sounded that those dogs actually belong to TEPCO, because they were found at privately owned area of the plant,” Mr. Hoshi told The Australian. […]

Return our dogs, TEPCO demands

A MAN who snatched two dogs to safety from the grounds of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has revealed the plant’s disgraced operator TEPCO later rang him to assert ownership over them.

The Australian yesterday revealed the story of animal rescue "guerilla" Hiroshi Hoshi’s mission to the plant to grab two Japanese Shiba dogs spotted wandering around on a webcam trained on the facility.

Yesterday, Mr. Hoshi said one of the plant’s managers, who called himself Mr. Igarashi, made a "ghoulish and bizarre" phone call to him soon after he rescued the dogs, suggesting they had become company property.

"He sounded that those dogs actually belong to TEPCO, because they were found at privately owned area of the plant," Mr. Hoshi told The Australian.

"We will never give them away — we are the guardians of those two dogs."

The dogs, thought to be sisters, were first seen at the plant earlier this month, three months after the nuclear accident, and were found to have absorbed significant amounts of radiation.

Nevertheless, they have been given a clean bill of health and were given to a couple in Yokohama.

Mr Hoshi, 55, has been making a series of unauthorized missions into the radioactive zone to rescue distressed animals. Yesterday, he received an offer to collaborate on rescue efforts from an NGO called Japan Earthquake Animal Rescue, comprising Japan’s best-known animal welfare organizations.

The organization has government permission to operate within the 20km perimeter around the nuclear plant, but Mr. Hoshi has been critical of the slowness of its members to act to ease the suffering of the thousands of animals in the area.

"I am still deciding whether I should accept this offer to join forces," he said.


JAPAN

Animal Lovers Raid Fukushima to Save Radioactive Dogs

Sam Biddle — There may be many lost animals of Fukushima, but you can strike two off that list: daring civilians spotted two pooches on a Fukushima livestream, then slipped behind nuclear lines to rescue the "atomic dogs." This, my friends, is heroism.

The pooch raiders, part of the Hachiko Coalition of Japanese animal welfare enthusiasts, infiltrated the evacuation dead zone (and the perimeter of the plant itself) in search of two dogs they caught on the plant’s live webcam, roaming without food, care, or protection from constant radiation.

According to the Hachiko crew (itself named after a beloved Japanese dog, legendary in the annals of canine history), these dogs were not only a tragic sight, but posed a threat to humans—what happened if they got dosed up on radiation and then wandered back to civilization? TEPCO and the Japanese government have been letting critters roam free this entire time, despite repeated calls for a thorough animal removal plan.

So they did it themselves. Donning hazmat suits, the volunteers drove to the plant, found the dogs, and sped out of there to a nearby veterinary hospital, where the two dogs were decontaminated and treated for their radiation exposure. The furry couple received two and three μSv of radiation respectively, which is low for humans, but for dogs—we’re not sure. We’ll keep track of the atomic duo for you, but for now, they appear to be happy, healthy and in (non-radioactive) hands.

This is probably the single happiest story to come out of Fukushima, so go ahead and soak it up. [via Hachiko Coalition]

Video: Fukushima 1F LIVE 20110602a

Gizmodo.com

Related:

Japanese Risk Radiation in Evacuation Zone to Rescue Stranded Dogs

Against All Odds:  Japanese Dog Found Weeks After Tsunami

June 28, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , , | 1 Comment

Little Boy and His Dog

Video:  Little Boy and His Dog

A two year old boy and his dog Toby spend the day together, being friends. It’s an amazing little video that highlights the bond between a boy and his dog.

This is a great a video.  Touches everyone’s heart, especially if you had a dog when you were younger.  But in reality, not all pet and child relationships work out this well.  Each story is different.  Not to be the wet blanket, but in general:

Dogs and Children (the other side of the coin)

Young children and dogs should never be left alone and unattended even for a moment. Young children generally do not have proper dog etiquette and dogs do not understand a child’s behavior. This can result in tragedy with any breed of dog. And many breeds are not recommended for homes with young children. Many breed’s and dog behavior can result in conflicts with small children. Small dogs are generally not good with children because children are too rough, too loud and too fast moving for them. But each dog and child relationship should be considered individually.  Remember the little boy and dog in this video are being supervised.  After all someone is filming…

It is great for a child to grow up with a pet, but always with supervision.  And unless you already have the pet when your child is born, it is better to wait until your child is old enough and calmer so they can relate to the needs of the pet and help take care of them. There are always exceptions to every rule.  Some breeds and individual dogs are extremely patient and great with kids… even young ones, like the one on this video.  And some kids love pets and have the perfect demeanor even at a young age.  Generally, however, it is better when the dogs are out of the puppy stage, so you are not dealing with 2 babies, and even better when the child is a bit older.

If you know your child has a tendency to be unkind or troubled… do not get them a pet; get them a psychologist! Let us remember that animals are live creatures and not toys or possessions.

And every parent needs to understand that somewhere along the way, your child is going to get nipped or scratched.  It is part of growing up with a pet.  Don’t over react!  A pet should be part of the family and no family member is perfect!

Kind of two opposite perspectives here…  But always better to be realistic!

June 27, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, animals, Dogs, Help Familie Keep Their Pets, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pancreatitis in Dogs

Update for all those who have asked  and sent their best wishes and prayers for Angelina… (06.27.11  8a.m.)

Thank you to all of you who have asked about her.  My husband Tim is on his way right now to pick her up at the Vet’s.  Her symptoms are better but the Vet says it takes a week before the the levels in the blood go down, so too early to test. The Vet was in the office at about 2a.m. last night and sometime between then and 7a.m. when the first of his staff come in, Angelina had managed to get out of her cone and remove her own IV.  (We warned him!) He said she didn’t like their food, the environment or the company…  Or lack thereof~  So, it was probably time to come get her. ;-)

We had to take the littlest of our four pups, Angelina, to the vet today.  Turns out she has pancreatitis. Who knows why but perhaps because we are temporarily in a situation where we can’t control everything she/they eat.

Angelina is the little chocolate brown and white one. (Photo by UCLA Shutterbug)

Poor thing had to stay at the hospital because she needed an infusion of fluids.  I felt so bad. She is used to having us around plus her doggie family and there was only one other dog at the hospital… and he was knocked out suffering from liver cancer.  We left her with an IV, a cone around her neck and a pain patch in a cage all by herself.  I wanted to cry and she was crying when we left. I tried to convince the vet to let me stay and watch over both of them… keeping him from having to run over in the middle of night to check on them, but no go because of liability issues.

She kept looking at me like… Mom are you leaving me?  How could you? Are you ever coming back?  And then I felt particularly bad because I hadn’t brought her a toy or a blanket that smelled like home; never thought she’d have to stay over.  (The blanket was a clean freshly washed one,)  It made me think of all the people who just abandon or dump their pets and makes me wonder even more than I always have… How could they?

The other 3 are all moping around and the Dad of the bunch keeps walking around like he is looking for her.

M~

What Is Pancreatitis?

Pancreatitis is simply an inflammation of the pancreas and is found in animals as well as humans.

So what’s a pancreas? It’s a little gland located near the stomach.

The pancreas has two main jobs. Its first job is to produce enzymes that help digest food. Its other job is to produce insulin, which regulates the blood sugar level.

And the cause of spontaneous pancreatitis in dogs is not well understood.

Types of Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis in dogs is usually divided into chronic and acute cases.

Symptoms of chronic pancreatitis are milder and are often mistaken for other illnesses.

While chronic pancreatitis is the milder form of the two, it’s a continuing inflammatory disease that’s often accompanied by slow, irreversible damage.

Acute pancreatitis is usually more severe, but when it’s over, there’s no remaining damage to organs.

So basically, pancreatitis can be acute and only occur once in a dog’s lifetime or it can become chronic and keep returning over and over again. It can be a rapidly life threatening illness or a mild attack of pain that resolves in a few hours or a day or so.

There’s another very severe form of this condition called necrotizing pancreatitis, in which the damage is so severe that portions of the pancreas are actually destroyed. Some authors refer to this as hemorrhagic pancreatitis.

This form of pancreatitis can be fatal and requires early intervention and aggressive treatment.

Causes of Pancreatitis in Dogs

In a large number of cases, the cause of pancreatitis remains unclear.  Like with colitis, we really don’t know what causes it.

However, there are certain things that we know are associated with the disease.

Genetics.  Many dogs are just born with it or if they have parents or grandparents that suffered with it they can inherit the propensity if not the disease itself.

There was a period where vets, who were trained through a training system that was affected by large donations from the commercial pet food industry, use to think and tell people who fed their pets human food, which is actually real food, was causing or at least sparking outbreaks of pancreatitis.  But just like with pre-packaged food for humans and commercial baby food, we are realizing that we have been had. Big Pharma has controlled the medical field for humans for years and works on the same concept and formula for babies and commercial pet foods.

Cooking for your pets or feeding them a raw diet is now being taught as the healthiest diets.  Back to the way grandma great-grandma fed her pets, kids and family is finally coming back into mode.

Dogs with diets high in fat, and dogs who have recently gotten into the trash or have been fed ‘greasy’ table scraps, seem to have a higher incidence of the disease.  Ham, bacon, meat fat from our plates that we won’t or shouldn’t eat, processed hot dogs, ice cream, and greasy junk foods can cause an out break of pancreatitis.  In fact, a single high fat meal can cause pancreatitis in a dog whose normal diet is moderate or low in fat.

That’s why there’s a rash of pancreatitis cases at vet clinics around Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter every year. People just can’t resist sharing their ‘high fat’ leftovers with the family dog.

Some other factors contributing to the development of pancreatitis in dogs include:

  • Obesity
  • Trauma
  • Liver disease
  • Lack of exercise
  • Certain medications
  • Cushing’s disease
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Recent abdominal surgery
  • Blood clotting disorders
  • Long-term use of corticosteroids
  • High calcium levels in the blood
  • High triglyceride and/or cholesterol levels in the blood

But for some dogs who are genetically pre-disposed to pancreatitis it can be none of the above.

Signs and Symptoms of Pancreatitis In Dogs

The most common symptoms of pancreatitis are:

  • fever
  • lack of appetite
  • depression
  • vomiting
  • signs of abdominal pain

Other pancreatitis symptoms include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Yellow, greasy stool
  • Dehydration
    • sunken eyes
    • dry mouth
    • dry skin
  • Lethargy
  • Depression
  • Weakness
  • Irritability
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Rapid breathing
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Redness of the gums
  • Signs of shock
Making a Diagnosis

Pancreatitis in dogs mimics several other conditions, making diagnosis difficult. Some of these most common “look alike” conditions are:

  • Acute gastroenteritis
  • Colitis
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Intestinal obstruction

While there is no definitive test for pancreatitis, your veterinarian will try to make a diagnosis through information obtained from:

  • Medical history (especially what your dog eats)
  • Physical exam
  • Laboratory tests
  • Radiographs (X-rays)
  • Abdominal ultrasound
  • CAT scan
  • Biopsy (occasionally)
Treatment For Pancreatitis In Dogs

The treatment your veterinarian selects will depend on the severity and duration of the illness. Dogs with a mild case of chronic pancreatitis may be treated at home, while those with a severe case of acute pancreatitis will require hospitalization and intensive care.

Resting the pancreas and gastrointestinal system is the most important key to your dog’s recovery.

That means no food or water by mouth for at least 24 hours to 48 hours.

The second major part of the treatment is the administration of large amounts of intravenous fluids.

Most dogs with pancreatitis are dehydrated from recurrent vomiting and diarrhea.

Other treatment measures include drugs to control vomiting, pain medications, and sometimes antibiotics to control or prevent bacterial infection.

Once the patient seems to feel better, he’s allowed to drink a bit of water. If he doesn’t vomit in the next 12 to 24 hours, he can graduate to solid food. He’ll probably be given small meals of a bland, easily digestible, low-fat food.

Over the course of a week or more, the amount of food can be gradually increased. Most dogs can go home once they’re able to eat and drink again.

Some dogs, if there was damage to the pancreas, may need supplemental treatment such as enzymes or insulin indefinitely.

Complications of Pancreatitis In Dogs

Dogs with severe pancreatitis can recover, but may also develop fatal complications, including:

  • Shock
  • Abnormal bleeding and clotting
  • Heart arrhythmias
  • Liver or kidney damage
  • Abdominal inflammation and fluid accumulation
  • Sepsis (internal infection from bacteria and toxins)
  • Breathing difficulties
How Can I Keep It From Happening Again?

Pancreatitis can be a very unpredictable disease. In most cases, if the attack was mild and the dog only had one episode, chances of full recovery are good. Simply avoiding high fat foods may be all that’s needed to prevent another attack and/or complications.

Most vets generally prescribe a low-fat, high-fiber diet for pancreatitis in dogs, to help speed recovery and to prevent future episodes. (Homemade chicken and rice is a great choice!)

Depending on your dog’s situation, the diet recommendations may require a change for life or he may be able to gradually return to his former food, if it’s low enough in fat and high enough in quality.

Although most dogs can eat an occasional high-fat meal without a problem, once a dog develops pancreatitis, a high-fat meal will often cause another episode.

And make sure he can’t get into the garbage!

Some vets will try to steer you toward special commercial food for dogs with pancreatitis. If you feed your pet commercially prepared food, it is probably healthier than what you are feeding now and if you feed your pets a mixture of pet food and real food, you might try this type right after the incident and see if they will eat it. But the best food you can feed your dog is homemade chicken and rice, veggies, barley and a variety of non-fatty meats, plus a high quality probiotic and a natural vitamin daily.  Natural chicken and duck type jerky strips and homemade biscuits are the best treats.

Sadly, veterinarians like MD’s know very little about nutrition.  Vet and Med schools only spend about 10-hours out of their entire training process on the subject.  Some, however, are beginning to educate themselves on this and other subjects, and once they do they all become proponents of feeding your pet real food, raw or homemade (non-greasy, non-junk) foods.  The idea that real food is human food and not good is proof of the great selling job big business and marketing firms have done and the myth they have sold the public as well as many veterinarians and vet schools.  Just look at what animals eat in the wild.  Americans are starting back on the road to common sense on this matter as well as on many others.

Holistic, natural or alternative vets are always the best choice.  They generally combine western veterinary medicine with nutritional therapy, acupuncture, chiropractic and other other holistic practices in order to treat the whole dog and the whole disease, including its root cause.

We have found that when our little Chiweenie (Chihuahua-Dachshund mix) has a flare-up from pancreatitis that a double dose of StemPets: For Dogs (and cats) helps her get back to her normal self better than anything we have found, prescription or natural, and giving it to her daily has kept her from having many flare-ups or kept them mild.

Who’s At Risk?

As with most diseases or conditions, certain dog breeds are more susceptible to pancreatitis than others. Miniature Schnauzers have a genetic susceptibility to the disease.

Other dogs that seem to be more predisposed to this condition are Yorkshire and Silky Terriers, Dachshunds, Miniature Poodles, and Cocker Spaniels.

The disease occurs usually in middle aged to older dogs, and overweight dogs are at a higher risk. It seems to affect females a little more frequently than males. Dogs with diabetes are also more at risk than others.

But it can strike any breed in any physical condition and at any age.

June 26, 2011 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Related Education, animals, Chiweenie, Dogs, Holistic Pet Health, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , | 24 Comments

BEHOLD YODA: CHINESE CRESTED-CHIHUAHUA MIX DEEMED ‘UGLIEST DOG’

AP

PETALUMA, California (AP) — Yoda’s short tufts of hair, protruding tongue, and long, seemingly hairless legs were enough to earn it the World’s Ugliest Dog title at a Northern California fair.

The 14-year-old Chinese crested and Chihuahua mix won the honor Friday night at the 23rd annual contest at the Sonoma Marin Fair.

Owner Terry Schumacher of Hanford, California, says the 2-pound (900-gram) dog has come a long way since she was found abandoned behind an apartment building. Schumacher says she first thought the pooch was a rat.

Yoda’s distinction comes a year after a one-eyed Chihuahua named Princess Abby claimed victory. A pedigree Chinese crested won in 2008 and another Chinese crested and Chihuahua mix was the ugliest in 2007.

Raw Video: the World’s ‘Ugliest Dog’

In past years, the winner’s owner has received a $1,000 check.

I’m a dog lover and say… Yoda is cute… in his own way!!

h/t to the Blaze

June 26, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, On The Lighter Side, Pet Events, pet fun, Pets, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Israel: ‘We didn’t kill the dog,’ as court denies ordering stoning of a dog to death

Published June 22nd, 2011 – 14:08 GMT via SyndiGate.info

The court secretariat has strongly denied reports which claimed that it had passed out orders for stoning a dog to death because the judges believed that it was the reincarnation of a lawyer who had been cursed for insulting Jews.

The secretariat has said that it was ‘bitter humor’, and all that happened was the local dogcatcher had removed the dog.

"The female dog found a seat in the corner of the court. And the children were delighted by it; there were hundreds outside the court. They are used to seeing stray cats but most have never seen a dog before. The only action we took was to dial the number of the Jerusalem Municipality to get the people in charge to take it away" the statement of the court said.

"There was no talk of reincarnation, a lawyer has never been mentioned, either now or 20 years ago, and there was no stoning" the statement said further.

The rabbinical court had reportedly passed the sentence after a large dog wandered into a court in Mea Shearim neighborhood of Jerusalem and frightened the judges.

Dogs are not often invited to sit in courtrooms-  in the witness stand, or jury box, or bench for that matter. But in this case in an Israeli courtroom a dog made an appearance but reportedly was not tried for any crimes.

Dogs are not often invited to sit in courtrooms- in the witness stand, or jury box, or bench for that matter. But in this case in an Israeli courtroom a dog made an appearance but reportedly was not tried for any crimes.

 

Related:

Dogs… Pets – Beyond Traditional Islam

Man’s Best Friend in Shariah’s Cruel Crosshairs

June 23, 2011 Posted by | animal behavior, Dogs, Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, Pets, Unusual Stories | , , | Leave a comment

New masks give pets a fighting chance against fires

San Diego, CA — San Diego animals now have a better chance of surviving fires thanks to the San Diego Fire Rescue Foundation.  An anonymous donation specifically earmarked to buy oxygen masks for pets allowed SDFRF to purchase 10 new sets of animal oxygen masks.  Each set contains a small, medium, and large oxygen mask, six foot tubing for each mask, a leash, a bright orange carry bag, and a sticker that shows which rig is carrying this lifesaving equipment.  “The nice thing is they can be sterilized and reused,” said Wendy Robinson, executive director of SDFRF.

While the donation was only for city of San Diego firefighters, it affects the whole region because San Diego firefighters assist regionally with wild fires and other major fires. 

Thousands of pets are killed yearly in house fires.  Most die due to asphyxiation.  These smaller oxygen masks are specifically designed to fit over the muzzle of a cat or dog, and that makes treatment more effective.

"Our firefighters put their lives on the line everyday to keep San Diego’s citizens, property, and yes, even animals, safe from fire and other emergencies.  Equipping our emergency first responders with enhanced service tools helps them better respond to the hundreds of emergency calls that occur daily in the San Diego area," said Robinson.

These new pet oxygen masks will enable San Diego firefighters to better respond to pet emergencies

These new pet oxygen masks will enable San Diego firefighters to better respond to pet emergencies

Photo Credits:  Courtesy of San Diego Fire Rescue Foundation

A San Diego firefighter demonstrates how the new pet oxygen masks work.

 

In this day and age, our pets are becoming more and more an integral part of our family.  It’s nice to know the San Diego Fire Department understands this and is taking steps to safeguard our pets.

By Vania Maldonado  -  Animal Rescue Examiner  – Vania Maldonado is a happily married cat rescuer. Over the past ten years, she’s lived in several different places and has helped stray and feral…

Cross-Posted at Just One More Pet

June 22, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Dogs, Fostering and Rescue, Just One More Pet, Unusual Stories | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Here Is A Toast to the Doggie (Pet) Dads… Both 2 Legged and 4 Legged

Very few dogs have the experience of being parents these days and especially seeing their litters through the process of weaning and then actually being able to remain part of a pack with at least part of their family.

Apachi is our Doggie Dad.  He is a Chiweenie and here he is is watching his brood being born with the help of their human Dad.  Angel, the mom, is a fawn faced Chihhuahua.

It was an amazing experience for us be part of and to observe the dog family go through this process was heartwarming, educational and touching on many levels.  Mom, Angel, would not let Apachi near the pups, which confused him, because he was a great dad and only wanted to watch over them.  (But we know that is not the case with many males dogs!  They often kill their offspring.)  Angel nursed the 4-puppies until they were 8-weeks-old and then partially for another 2-weeks as we weaned them off.  She was also a great mom, but from the day the pups were weaned, Dad took over playing with them and watching over them.  Angel had done her part!

Here Apachi is playing with and watching his pups at 31-days-old.  Once they were able to get out of the basket he would play with them whenever possible. But in the basket, they were off limits.

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The two boys went to great homes and we still hear from their new families.  One of the girls also went to good home, but came back because they could not keep her (long story), so we ended up with a Doggie family of 4… who are now 7, 5.5 and 2-grown-pups at 4-years-old.  Although a lot of work, it is an experience that few people as well as few dogs get to be part of.  It is worth every moment of extra work or minor inconvenience!!

Here is a pile up of Apachi, the Pups: Angelina, Magnum, Princess and Goji, with their human Dad

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Here they are now… the family of 4:

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Dad Apachi, Pup Princess, Pup Angelina and Mom Angel, huddling with Daddy Tim before a big game…

Hope You All Had A Great Father’s Day!!

Posted by Ask Marion, photos by the UCLA Shutterbug and Just One More Pet

June 20, 2011 Posted by | Adopt Just One More Pet, Animal and Pet Photos, animal behavior, Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Chihuahua, Chiweenie, Dogs, Holidays With Pets, If Animlas Could Talk..., Just One More Pet, Man's Best Friend, NO KILL NATION, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , | Leave a comment

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