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Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

Feeding the Eagles

January of this year, 2010, the weather stayed so cold in St. Louis, Missouri and  Alton, Illinois that the bald eagles were cruising over houses in hopes of a quick meal.

They could not access fish that were at the bottom of the river and had gathered together. 

Some kind souls decided to feed the eagles so they would survive the cold spell.

They gathered fish and started feeding the group of eagles huddled on the shore.

The photos below show what happened. A former teaching colleague took these photos in front of his home.

Incredible!

Feeding the Eagles!

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A beautiful morning feeding the eagles, Jan. 2010


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Once the fish were thrown, the eagles did not seem to fear the good Samaritans and
word spread fast! 

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Eagles vying for the fish.  January, 2010.


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No zoom lens used here!  The photographer was this close! 


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Here are the men who were feeding them. So close!!

As you know, it was not too long ago that the American Bald Eagle, our nation’s mascot, was an endangered species.

 

The Amazing Bald Eagle

September 26, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Whale Shark: Close Encounters with The Gentle Giant

Ranging from four to fourteen meters long, whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) are the largest members of the cartilaginous fishes (Class Chondrichthynes), making them the world’s largest sharks and fish. Yes, the whale shark is a fish, not a whale as what its name implies. Its closest relatives are the rays and other species of sharks.

image source

The earth’s water portion is far larger than the land in terms of geography.  Just as land is home to many plants and animals, so are the seas and other bodies of water.  Among these fascinating varieties of living creatures live the fascinating gentle giant of the sea.

Ranging from four to fourteen meters long, whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) are the largest members of the cartilaginous fishes (Class Chondrichthynes), making them the world’s largest sharks and fish.  Yes, the whale shark is a fish, not a whale as what its name implies.  Its closest relatives are the rays and other species of sharks.

Read more in Marine Biology

« Dolphin Communication

The Blue Whale »

Image by jon hanson via Flickr

The whale shark has and enormous mouth that can reach a width of 1.4 meters, but its not designed to bite off people unlike those of the Great White sharks.  Its mouth is at the very front of its head unlike other sharks, which have their have their mouths on the underside of the head.  Its wide flat head has a rounded snout, small eyes, five large gill slits, two dorsal fins, and two pectoral fins.  Its tail has a top fin that is much larger than the lower fin.  Like in most sharks, female whale sharks are larger than the males.

Yellowish markings on very thick dark gray skin best distinguish the whale sharks from other sharks.  According to some biologists this skin feature serves as a camouflage for the whale shark when it preys on shoals of fish.  The camouflage spots on its skin, especially concentrated on its head, resemble a shoal of fish, thus attracting approaching fishes instead of scaring them away.

Whale sharks sieve enormous amounts of plankton, which they eat through their gills as they swim.  Thus, they are called filter feeders.  As they swim with their mouths open, masses of water filled with plankton and small fishes enter their mouths and pass through spongy tissues between their large gill arches.  After closing their mouths, whale sharks use gill rakes that filter the food from the water.  Anything that does not pass through the gills is eaten.  Gill rakes are bristly structures in their mouths that trap small organisms, which they then swallow.  Despite their enormous size, whale sharks’ diet comprise only of plankton, krill, small fish, squid, and other small invertebrates.  This is why they are fondly regarded as the “gentle giants of the sea.”

Image via Wikipedia

Whale sharks are solitary creatures.  They have been known to inhabit warm waters near the equator both along the coast and in the open seas, from Sabah, Malaysia to the Galapagos Islands.  Interestingly, congregations of whale sharks have also been observed to frequent Australia’s Ningaloo Reef, and in Donsol in the Bicol peninsula of the Philippines.  However, these regular visits by whale sharks to Donsol waters are no longer a surprise to local villagers, who have been aware of these massive but harmless fish species which they call “butanding.”

Image by ~MVI~ (in Bangkok 4 Climate Nego) via Flickr

Whale sharks are known to spend most of their time near the water surface.  This is also one of the reasons why they easily fall prey to unscrupulous fish catchers who hunt and butcher them.  Some might say that whale sharks are butchered anyway to provide humans with tons of meat and other raw materials for various commercial products.  However, people should consider the decreasing population of whale sharks.  In fact, the whale shark is already in the list of endangered species.  In the Philippines, it is now illegal to hunt and harvest these “butandings.”  Some non-government organizations, like the Haribon Foundation are active with their “save our endangered species” programs to protect the whale sharks as well as other endangered creatures.

Read more: http://scienceray.com/biology/marine-biology/whale-shark-close-encounters-with-the-gentle-giant/#ixzz10ZCWEYIL

September 25, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Videos: Pool Playing Dogs

Video:  Chihuahua Playing Pool

Video:  Halo the Pool Playing Dog

September 21, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Noah the Dove

Enjoy this. It is so sweet and expresses so much that we hold to as abiding under His wing.

This little heart in this bird which is only a fraction in size of ours has more tenderness, more compassion, even more love than a whole bunch of Humans   …Bob Garrison

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These little bunnies, about 6 days old, were attacked by a dog and orphaned. Two out of the litter of five did not survive, and these three were not doing very well.

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Noah is a non-releasable, one-legged homing pigeon/rock dove that is in the rehab centre. Noah kept going over to the bunny cage and looking in — even sleeping in front of the door to the cage.

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Then, suddenly, there were only two bunnies in the cage.  But when Noah moved a bit from the front of the cage to everyone’s surprise…there was the tiny bunny…under Noah’s wing…sound asleep! That little bunny rabbit had crawled through the cage, preferring a featherbed, no doubt to snuggling up with its littermates!

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Now, they are all together and the bunnies are doing GREAT. When the bunnies scoot underneath Noah’s feathers, he carefully extends his wings out to surround them and then they snuggle. When one of them moves and they start sticking out here and there, he gently pushes them back under him with his beak!  It is beautiful and amazing to see…

This is what God does with us when we need the warmth and love He offers. He gathers us under His loving wings to a warm cradle of protection. All we need do in return is give Him the thanks and praise for being with us.


Update on Noah the pigeon:

We are Bob and Georganne Lenham of Wild Rose Rescue Ranch in  Texas , home of Noah the Pigeon.

After finding many posts online featuring Noah and the bunnies and reading about the many lives he has touched (his story has been forwarded around the world) we thought we’d post a follow-up and a few new photos.

We knew there was something special about Noah the moment we saw him.

Although the bunnies seem to be his favorite, Noah helps out with many rescue babies here at the Wild Rose Rescue Ranch…

Noah’s first litter of bunnies, almost raised and  ready for release.

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Photo © Bob Lenham

Now, Noah helps out with many rescue babies here at the ranch…

How wonderful it is to have a full-time soft-feathered nurturer here at the rescue ranch! He cuddles with all the babies as they snuggle under his warm feathers…and he "coos" as if singing them to sleep with a lullaby.

Noah is truly, truly a God-send.

He will cover you with His feathers And under His wings you will find refuge. Psalm 91:4

Please look for the upcoming book "Noah and The Bunnies" to be released in Summer ’09 from "A String Of Pearls Tails." Each book in the series tells the story of a wildlife baby here at Wild Rose Rescue Ranch.

When you these amazing rescue and adoption stories like this by animals of all kinds and then think about all the cruelty that man has inflicted on animals, there is no choice but to admit that humans are the cruelest animals of them all and not nearly as smart as we give ourselves credit for.

His Eye Is On The Sparrow… or Swallow

Hummingbirds

Isn’t That Tweet?!?

Poly Our Greycheek

September 19, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Loving, intelligent – ‘Micropig’ is the new pet craze

Jane Croft,with a baby micropig

Vidya Ram

London, Sept. 18

Pigs – they’ve been the subject of many a children’s story, but somehow that “cute portrayal” has rarely translated into domestic life, with the prospect of a 200- kg giant traipsing round a home proving too daunting for even the most enthusiastic of animal lovers. Now, thanks to a new craze for “micropigs” sweeping across the United Kingdom, that could be about to change.

In the next couple of weeks, “This Little Piggy: A Celebration of the World’s Most Irresistible Pet,” launches in the UK, with serialisations in a couple of leading dailies, and television programmes, with detailed information on the history and care for these creatures, which can grow up to just 16 inches. Author and owner of the high profile Little Pig Farm, Jane Croft hopes that this will be the start. While a range of merchandise already exists, she’s hoping to take it into designer bags, a large visitors centre – and in the long term – branches in every country across the world.

Micro pigs, originally imported from Vietnam, have been around for a couple of decades, but interest had died down in recent years – rapidly reviving as a result of Croft’s farm, which has already attracted hundreds of buyers and franchisee requests from across the world since being set up in April 2009. Her hopes of building a global business have already begun to become reality: this year franchisee farms, run by trusted associates of Croft, will be set up in Japan, Korea, Canada and the US, as well as a number across Britain.

Intelligent than dogs

While the pig protagonists of books such as A.A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh, or E.B. White’s Charlotte’s Web (not to mention the film Babe) help the “family” appeal of pigs, they have other qualities that make them attractive pets, says Croft. Allergy-prone people are less susceptible to the hair of pigs than the fur of dogs and cats, for example. “They are also extremely intelligent…far more intelligent than dogs,” says Croft, who has several of the animals pottering around her kitchen and living room. Pigs’ intelligence has of course been picked up in literature, with characters such as the villainous Napoleon of George Orwell’s Animal Farm. However, this characteristic is something that troubles animal rights campaigners.

“It is important for people to be aware of the fact that pigs are highly intelligent and social animals,” says Helen Coen of the Royal Society for the Protection of Cruelty to Animals. “The fact that these micro pigs are being marketed as an “easy” option is worrying in itself…” However, Croft insists that while some rogue breeders may give the industry a bad name, she’s always careful to vet prospective owners (and has already turned down several)– ensuring that the homes must have large outdoor space and that pigs are left alone for excessive periods of time (working owners must have at least two to ensure that the animals have company).

Either way, the pigs don’t come cheaply, starting at £550 pounds, and going up to £1,200 for the smallest 14-inch “deluxe” pigs. For those hoping to start their own business – Croft’s pigs aren’t the solution, though – it’s only neutered males that are up for sale.  There’s also a waiting list of up to six months.

To some it’s a price worth paying. “They are the incredibly affectionate, easy to look after and the cheapest thing to maintain,” says Suzanna Bowman, owner and manager of a pub in the county of North Lincolnshire, with five micropigs on her five-acre plot of land (and home).  Whether such rosy experiences of the pigs will convince buyers across the world remains to be seen.

More Stories on : Lifestyle | Animals & Livestock

Posted:  Just One More Pet

September 19, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Baby Panda Sneezing… Too Cute!

Video:  Baby Panda Sneezing 

Original footage taken and being used with kind permission of LJM Productions Pty. Ltd.,/Wild Candy Pty. Ltd. Authentic t-shirts http://www.sneezingbabypanda.com

*The link in the video is at the request of the original owner of the footage.

Hat Tip to Dr. Mercola/Dr. Becker – http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2010/09/17/sneezing-baby-panda.aspx

September 18, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

From Shelter to Safety

MISSION VIEJO Phoenix rubbed his earless, scarred head against Tiffany Norton’s hand, pushing for a pat.

The emaciated German shepherd mix had just come out of a bath Tuesday to soothe his infected, flea-covered body. The dog was rescued Monday by Coastal German Shepherd Rescue, which took Phoenix out of a Downey shelter hours before he was scheduled to be euthanized, and brought him to the Alicia Pet Care Center.

Rescuers think Phoenix, about 5, was used as a bait dog – a submissive dog that is confined and attacked by fight dogs-in-training. He was found as a stray a few days ago, said Norton, the rescue group’s director.

That’s typical, according to officials with the Los Angeles Police Department’s Animal Cruelty Task Force.

“We usually see the dogs after they’ve been in fights and are discarded in trash bins or as stray dogs wandering in the alley,” officer Ramon Munez said. “We have some weeks where we’ll see a lot, and then it will ebb off. The (Los Angeles) district attorney has put out a hot line.”

Dogfighting is rare in Orange County, O.C. Animal Care Director Ryan Drabek said. The agency has not investigated a professional dogfighting ring in nine years, he said.

The Orange County Sheriff’s Department also rarely comes across such cases, said Capt. Don Barnes, who oversees the department’s South County operations.

“We had a few animal cruelty calls last year, but none of them were related to dogfighting,” he said.

Matthew Wheaton, the veterinarian at Alicia Pet Care who is helping Phoenix, said dogfights were regular events when he worked in emergency clinics in Los Angeles County.

“This is really over the top,” he said. “What makes it clear that he was a bait dog is that his ears were completely cut off. They’re not doctor-cropped. They’re gone.”

Wheaton said a bait dog’s ears, which can be easily injured in a fight, are cut off to eliminate the potential for wounds that would have to be treated.

Wheaton said Phoenix shows other features of being a bait dog, including evidence his jaw had been wired or bound shut to prevent him from hurting the fight dog. He is also submissive.

“While fighting dogs are well taken care of, bait dogs are the bottom of the barrel. It’s super-sad,” Wheaton said. “They are beaten down and scared.”

Wounds on Phoenix’s head suggest he probably fought within the past two weeks, Wheaton said.

Phoenix was set to be euthanized Monday, but a shelter volunteer asked for a day’s reprieve. She took his photo and sent messages to rescue groups.

Norton got hundreds of e-mails from people who know she rescues German shepherds.

“When I saw his photo, I knew I had to do something,” Norton said. “Tuesday morning I picked him up. He’s a leaner – he wants to be attached to you all the time. If you move, he moves with you.”

Norton said she hopes to find a home for Phoenix and raise funds for his medical care.

“We’re looking for a softhearted family who can look past his injuries and assure that he will have a good life,” she said. “He lights up when he sees friendly animals and is great with kids.”

For more information or to help, call 714-528-4730.

Earless Dog Used As Bait in Fights Rescued

Article Tab : Rescuers think Phoenix was used as a bait dog, essentially a dog that is confined and attacked by fight dogs that are training.

Rescuers think Phoenix was used as a bait dog, essentially a dog that is confined and attacked by fight dogs that are training.

KEN STEINHARDT, THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

MISSION VIEJO – Phoenix rubbed his earless, scarred head against Tiffany Norton’s hand, pushing for a pat.

The emaciated German shepherd-mix had just come out of a bath on Tuesday to soothe his infected, flea-covered body. The dog was rescued on Monday by Coastal German Shepherd Rescue from a shelter in Downey – hours before he was scheduled to be euthanized – and brought to Alicia Pet Care Center.

Rescuers believe Phoenix, about 5 years old, was used as a bait dog – essentially a submissive dog that is confined and attacked by fight dogs-in-training. He was found as a stray a few days ago, said Norton, the rescue’s director.

That’s typical, according to officials with the Los Angeles Police Department’s Animal Cruelty Task Force.

"We usually see the dogs after they’ve been in fights and are discarded in trash bins or as stray dogs wandering in the alley," Officer Ramon Muñez said. "We have some weeks where we’ll see a lot and then it will ebb off. The (Los Angeles) District Attorney has put out a hotline. We get tips from that, 911 and Animal Control."

Dog fighting is rare in Orange County, OC Animal Care Director Ryan Drabek said.. The agency has not investigated a professional dog-fighting ring in the last nine years, he said.

The Orange County Sheriff’s Department also rarely comes across such cases, said Capt. Don Barnes, who oversees the department’s South County Operations.

"We had a few animal cruelty calls last year, but none of them were related to dog fighting," he said.

Matthew Wheaton, the veterinarian at Alicia Pet Care who is helping Phoenix, said dog fights and their aftermath were regular events when he worked in emergency clinics in Los Angeles County.

"This is really over the top," he said. "What makes it clear that he was a bait dog is that his ears were completely cut off. They’re not doctor-cropped, they’re gone."

Wheaton said a bait dog’s ears – which can be easily injured in a fight – are cut off to eliminate the potential for wounds to them that would have to be treated.

Wheaton said Phoenix shows other features of being a bait dog, including evidence his jaw had been wired or bound shut to prevent him from hurting the fight dog. He is also extremely submissive.

"While fighting dogs are well-taken-care-of, bait dogs are the bottom of the barrel – it’s super sad," Wheaton said. "They are beaten down and scared."

Wounds on Phoenix’s head suggest he was probably fought within the last two weeks, Wheaton said.

Phoenix was set to be euthanized Monday, but a shelter volunteer asked for a day’s reprieve. She took his photo and sent out messages to rescue groups.

Norton was inundated with hundreds of e-mails from people who knew she rescues German shepherds.

"When I saw his photo, I knew I had to do something," Norton said. "Tuesday morning I picked him up. He’s a leaner; he wants to be attached to you all the time. If you move, he moves with you. He has a really soulful spirit, he’s wise beyond his years and he’s super cuddly. When he came here he just started cuddling up with a kitten. When you think of what he’s been through – he holds no grudges."

Norton said she hopes to find a home for Phoenix and to raise funds for his medical care.

"We’re looking for a soft-hearted family who can look past his injuries and assure that he will have a good life," she said. "He lights up when he sees friendly animals and is great with kids."

Video and More Photos Here

For more information or to help, call 714-528-4730. Coastal German Shepherd has 125 rescued puppies and dogs waiting for more homes.

To read about other rescues, click here.

Contact the writer: 949-454-7307 or eritchie@ocregister.com

Comment:

SWEETTROSE  -  3:36 PM on September 16, 2010

This story broke my heart. I hope and pray that Phoenix finds the love that he deserves and that the individuals who did this feel the same pain and suffering in their own lives!

Dogs are mans best friend, they are put on this earth to please us and want nothing in return but love. That’s a simple request, isn’t it?

The Lost Dogs: Michael Vick’s Dogs and Their Tale of Rescue and Redemption

Video:  The Lost Dogs

Animal lovers and sports fans were shocked when the story broke about NFL player Michael Vick’s brutal dog fighting operation. But what became of the dozens of dogs who survived? As acclaimed writer Jim Gorant discovered, their story is the truly newsworthy aspect of this case. Expanding on Gorant’s Sports Illustrated cover story, The Lost Dogs traces the effort to bring Vick to justice and turns the spotlight on these infamous pit bulls, which were saved from euthanasia by an outpouring of public appeals coupled with a court order that Vick pay nearly a million dollars in "restitution" to the dogs.

As an ASPCA-led team evaluated each one, they found a few hardened fighters, but many more lovable, friendly creatures desperate for compassion. In The Lost Dogs, we meet these amazing animals, a number of which are now living in loving homes, while some even work in therapy programs: Johnny Justice participates in Paws for Tales, which lets kids get comfortable with reading aloud by reading to dogs; Leo spends three hours a week with cancer patients and troubled teens. At the heart of the stories are the rescue workers who transformed the pups from victims of animal cruelty into healing caregivers themselves, unleashing priceless hope.

Learn more at http://bit.ly/9EXWtj

Related:

Top 5 Myths about Pit Bulls

American Pit Bull Terrier Dogs… In Memory of Ace

Former Posts:

Posted:  Just One More Pet

September 17, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | 2 Comments

STOP Los Angeles and Other Major Cities from the Unreasonable Pet Limit Laws and Restrictions

LA plans to restrict households to 3 pets total.. cats and dogs.  Nobody is suggested we allow or promoting hoarding, but a 3 pet limit, especially when we have major over-capacity in our shelters is cruel and unusual punishment for both animals and owners.

Pet ownership needs to be dealt with on a case by case basis if there is a problem, but many people can easily own 4, 5 or 6 pets or own a couple and foster pets without any problems.

Stop the killing… Stop the rules and restrictions… Stop Big Brother!!

For some people, one pet is too much.  For other people 6 are perfect.  It is a matter of time, money, desire and love.  Instead of the land of the free, we have become a land of restrictions and robots.  Adopting just one more pet is a blessing for the person who can do it and saves a life.  Temporarily fostering animals is blessing and saves many lives.  Restricting people and whole cities to 1, 2 or 3 pets for no real reason is a curse for everybody… humans and animals alike as well ad for the spirit of a country who has lost its heart!!!

Do pet-limit laws make sense?


Vinnie, a confident, social guy, would love a home, even if he had to share the space with other cats and dogs   Photo: Philip White

Many people are surprised to learn there’s a legal limit to the number of dogs and cats you can have in Los Angeles.  Whether you live in a multi-acre compound or a one bedroom apartment, by law you’re only allowed three dogs and three cats per residence.

Initially this might appear to make sense.  We’ve all seen upsetting video of animal seizures at the homes of hoarders who get in over their heads with fifty, a hundred, or even hundreds of animals.  Although hoarders may start out with good intentions, by the time authorities intervene often the dogs or cats are suffering from severe neglect.


Purebred Jack Russell Trooper would normally have been adopted quickly, but an accident left him with a limp, and without a home  Photo: Jackie Bass

The only problem with this justification for pet-limit laws is that most animal care and mental health professionals agree hoarding is a mental disorder.  People who suffer from mental disorders generally don’t curb their compulsions based on what the law allows.

The ones who are really hurt by pet-limit laws are the cats and dogs waiting for good homes, and responsible potential adopters who are unable to provide those homes because they’re afraid Animal Services will raid their home and seize their beloved pets.  What’s the use of giving an animal a home if the City can come at any time, even if the pet is well cared for, and take that animal away to a kill shelter (all L.A. City and County shelters are currently kill shelters)?


Kitty, both beautiful and very sweet, would do well in a home with other cats  Photo: Vanda Krefft

Some courageous caregivers adopt anyway, striving to keep a low profile so they can continue to provide safe homes for as many pets as they can properly provide for.  But these people, motivated by kindness and the willingness to do what it takes to give animals in need a loving home, live in constant fear of discovery – of what?  Their dedication to caring for dogs and cats?  Because they’re willing to devote their lives and money to helping homeless and often stereotypically “unadoptable” animals, they live in fear that those animals may be taken from them and killed.

I know of one family that gives a wonderful home to many handicapped and chronically ill cats.  These are nice, normal people who have accepted that they don’t get to take vacations like others do.  They aren’t going to have a hot new car, or a “media room” with the newest flat screen TV, because their money goes to cat food, medication and vet bills.  But they’re making the lives of many cats happy and love-filled who otherwise would very likely have been killed long ago.  The catch?  This family doesn’t dare tell anyone how many cats they have – not even friends and fellow rescuers.  They live their lives under a cloud, simply because they choose to do what we say we value in this culture, which is to be kind, unselfish, and giving to less fortunate creatures.

And cats are much easier to hide than dogs.  How many homeless dogs could be saved, instead of killed in City and County shelters, if every caregiver who had three dogs but had the willingness and resources to care for four or more were able to do so?  I know one woman who, damn the torpedoes, has four dogs, most of them seniors, and who is thinking about adopting a fifth special needs dog.  Her dogs are the cleanest, nicest, most well taken care of dogs you’ll ever meet, even though if she hadn’t adopted them many of them might still be languishing in shelters, or worse, given their ages and special needs.

I know some people will object that it’s “too difficult” to care for that many dogs or cats.  But it’s only too difficult if that’s not what you want to do.  For those with the time, resources and love to give, it would be nice if our City and County gave them the option to feel on secure legal footing while providing a loving family to the homeless dogs and cats of L.A.

Source – Los Angeles Pet Rescue – Examiner

Pet-Limit Laws Unconstitutional

Massachusetts Town Puts Limits on Cat Ownership

Adopt Just One More…MV Temporarily Reduced Adoption Fees

And here we thought Chicago’s attempt to pass a five-dog limit was controversial!

Homeless With Pets… Choosing Pets Over Shelter

Is Your Pet a Voiceless Victim of the Tanking Economy?

Chinese City’s “One Dog” Policy Has Residents Howling

Florida’s Idea of Cat Population Control

Humane Society list of pet financial aid-related organizations

Where there is a will…

I care not for a man’s religion whose dog and cat are not the better for it." -Abraham Lincoln

September 17, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | 10 Comments

Socializing Your Dog to Other Dogs

You have a new bag of dog food and a bunch of new toys. You planned to take a day off work just to make this trip just as you have been planning for weeks and waiting for the pup you picked out to be weaned. You placed a deposit on the animal six months ago, long before it was even born and the day has finally come. You’re bringing the new puppy home today. On the way home, one of the kids asks, "Dad do you think him and old Yeller will get along?" UH OH… Forgot to plan that one out, didn’t you? Now what? Well, it looks like you are going to get a socializing lesson for your dogs. So how hard can it be? It’s not really difficult at all if you follow these simple steps.

For the First tip, insure the Safety of Both Animals and Yourself. To start, make certain that the puppy will be safe. If the new dog is small enough, place the new pup in a pet container or some other sturdy structure that prohibits the dog from actually physically contacting the animal but still allows for both animals to see, smell and hear each other. This provides a way for both animals to acclimate to each other in a safe situation. In the case of larger dogs or two adult dogs, leashing both animals may be advisable and having an assistant on hand is recommended.

Secondly, rewards will work wonders at achieving a peaceful home life for your two pets. After the animals have both calmed a bit give them each a small reward, such as a morsel of some favorite food. Be sure to give the dogs lots of verbal praise and affection for not barking or trying to be aggressive towards each other as this will show the dogs that you are accepting of the other pet’s presence and you expect them to be also. Repeat this process several times until both animals seem fairly accustomed to the presence of the other and their aggressions seem to have subsided.

The third tip to socializing your animal is Get Help. This step will require an assistant to help with one of the animals. Have the assistant leash the dog and hold him firmly on a very short leash. After instructing the assistant to maintain control of the dog, open the pet carrier and bring the new pet out carefully or if both animals are on leashes, bring them together. Your dogs will likely move towards each other to explore the other animal so be sure the assistant has the dog held tightly and be careful not to let the new pet panic and escape your grasp. Gradually bring them closer together and let them calmly adapt to each others presence. The dogs may show a bit of an aggression towards each other and this is ok at first. They will learn a pecking order quickly and resolve any small dilemmas between themselves.

The final point to remember is that not everyone is going to get along. There will be days where the dogs are going to feud. Some animals were just never meant to live in harmony but with a lot of patience and a little direction you can make your household fairly peaceable most of the time. When things go sour, just take it in stride and put the animals in their separate areas for a bit and, given a cooling period, they will be friends again in no time.

Another great idea for socializing your dog to other dogs can be done long before you get a new pup. Take your dog to the park or some place with lots of dogs and let him explore the other animals. Perhaps even be the host of a Pooch Party and invite several playmates for your dog and their human companions to come over for a treat and some time together. This is a great way to teach your dog some manners and also gives you a great way to relax. With these simple tips you can be certain that life around your home will be much more peaceful and your pets will have companions for a lifetime.

Recommended Resource Dog Trainer Pro

Dog Article courtesy of I-Love-Dogs.com  -  Cross-Posted:  Just One More Pet

September 16, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Dog Poo Powers a Streetlight In Massachusetts Park

Park Spark via Fast Company

Good dog parents might think they’re doing their part by using biodegradable baggies to pick up after their pooches. But after Fido’s feces go in the trash can and to a landfill, they release methane gas, a significant contributor to the greenhouse effect. A dog park in Cambridge, Mass., has a solution: Add in a methane digester, and let your dog waste power the streetlights, tea cart and popcorn machine.

The Park Spark methane digester, unveiled this week, only powers a streetlight for now — no poop-powered popcorn yet. But it’s a neat concept: Replace trash cans with a public methane digester, and you demonstrate how simple it can be to turn waste into fuel.

“As long as people own pets in the city and throw away dog waste, the production of energy will be continuous and unlimited,” the project’s Web site says.

The project involves three basic steps: Throw your dog’s waste into the digester, where anaerobic bacteria are ready to break it down. Stir the mixture to help methane rise to the top, and burn the methane to generate light or electricity.

After picking up their dogs’ waste in biodegradable bags, visitors to the Park Spark digester can feed the waste through an above-ground tube, and stir it with a hand crank. The bacteria container is buried underground and the methane is piped through the ground to the streetlamp, which burns with an eternal flame. Eventually, the project leaders want to use dog-generated methane to power vendor carts selling human food.

Conceptual artist Matthew Mazzotta came up with the idea, which is partially funded by MIT.

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The Park Spark Project

Park Spark Project

Park Spark Project!

Anywhere people are walking dogs can be a source of heat and light by introducing a Methane Digester into the equation. As long as people are walking dogs and throwing away dog poo, a flame can burn.

The Park Spark Project is the transformation of dog waste (dog poo) into energy (methane) through a publicly fed methane digester as an interactive urban intervention that questions our current waste system, and at the same time creates an opportunity for others to participate in the (re)imaging of the byproduct energy (methane).

The Park Spark Project is a digester (see "HOW IT WORKS" section), which is mostly buried underground except for a tube and a hand-crank that is above ground, so that people can feed the digester and stir the mixture inside. The methane created is piped to gas burning lamppost and constantly burning like an ‘eternal flame’. This eternal flame will burn until someone or a group of people propose an idea to use the heat and light of the constantly burning flame and make a public project. (See "GET INVOLVED" section)

September 15, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

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