JustOneMorePet

Every Pet Deserves A Good Home…

The Blue Dye in M&Ms Cures Spinal Injuries

I will choose to believe that they are working with mice who already are injured?!?  And let us hope that pet stores realize that cats and rats are not stuffed animals or toys!

Thanks to miracle compound BBG, mice turn blue, regain ability to walk

Awwwww:  University of Rochester

The next time someone tries to argue that all M&Ms are the same, no matter the color, you can tell them about the blue M&M. The candy (like Gatorade and other products) gets its color from a food dye similar to Brilliant Blue G (BBG) — a compound that, as it turns out, is medically useful. Building on earlier research, scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center have found that injections of BBG can relieve mice of secondary spinal cord injuries. In September, they will start conducting human clinical trials.

BBG works by inhibiting the function of P2X7, a molecule that pervades the spinal cord and assists another molecule, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), in killing off healthy motor neurons. Because quantities of ATP flow to the spinal cord post-injury, significant secondary injuries occur, which is why thwarting ATP’s activity is absolutely vital.

The U of R researchers were able to do just that, via injections of BBG. While rodents that hadn’t received the dose were never able to scurry around again following their injury, the mice that received the BBG regained their ability to walk (albeit with a limp).

The mice also turned temporarily blue, as a side-effect (the only one). The verdict here at Popsci.com is that it’s only a matter of time before pet stores start selling a rainbow of rats.

(And let us hope that pet stores realize that cats and rats are not stuffed animals or toys!)

By Anna Maria Jakubek - Posted 07.28.2009 at 3:01 pm – [Via CNN.com]

Source:  True Health Is True Wealth

Posted:  Just One More Pet

July 31, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rights And Awareness, Just One More Pet, Success Stories, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

NFL reinstates Michael Vick on conditional basis

Nearly two years after he pleaded guilty to a federal charge of bankrolling a dogfighting operation at a home he owned in Virginia, Michael Vick was reinstated to the National Football League on a conditional basis, according to an NFL statement Monday.

Vick “will be considered for full reinstatement and to play in regular-season games by Week 6 based on the progress he makes in his transition plan,” the statement said. Week 6 of the NFL season is in October.

Vick may participate in practices, workouts and meetings and may play in his club’s final two preseason games under the conditions of his reinstatement, the league said.

Vick, in a statement, thanked the league’s commissioner and former Indianapolis Colts coach Tony Dungy, who has served as his mentor.

“I would like to express my sincere gratitude and appreciation to Commissioner [Roger] Goodell for allowing me to be readmitted to the National Football League,” Vick said in a statement. “I fully understand that playing football in the NFL is a privilege, not a right, and I am truly thankful for the opportunity I have been given.”

Vick, 29, was freed from federal prison at Leavenworth, Kansas, on May 20 and returned to his home to serve the last two months of his 23-month sentence in home confinement.

Vick also said in his statement that he is re-evaluating his life after the “terrible mistakes” he made.

“As you can imagine, the last two years have given me time to re-evaluate my life, mature as an individual and fully understand the terrible mistakes I made in the past and what type of life I must lead moving forward,” Vick said in the statement. “Again, I would like to thank the commissioner for the chance to return to the game I love and the opportunity to become an example of positive change.”

The former Atlanta Falcons player is a free agent and has not been signed by any team. Goodell said he was not involved in any negotiations between Vick and a team.

Dungy has agreed to continue working with Vick as an adviser and mentor, the NFL statement said.

Goodell said Vick underwent tests after requests from animal rights groups, including a psychiatric evaluation.

We worked with animal rights activist groups, and we are clear,” he said. “We worked with their medical professionals about the aspects of our evaluations. Michael fully cooperated with all of those tests. Those tests did not indicate there was any reason he couldn’t make a transition forward.”

In a letter to Vick, Goodell wrote that his decision regarding full reinstatement “will be based on reports from outside professionals, your probation officer and others charged with supervising your activities, the quality of your work outside football” as well as factors such as the absence of any further law enforcement issues.iReport.com: Should Vick get a second chance?

“This step-by-step approach is not meant to be a further punishment and should not be viewed as such,” Goodell wrote, according to the NFL. “Instead, it is intended to maximize the prospect that you can successfully resume your career and your life. I believe that a transitional approach with a strong network of support will give you the best opportunity to manage effectively the various issues and pressures that you will inevitably face in the coming weeks and months and earn your full reinstatement.” Video Watch Goodell talk about his decision »

The league suspended Vick indefinitely in August 2007 after his guilty plea. Although he was released from federal custody July 20, he must serve three years of probation, the league said.

In reviewing Vick’s status, Goodell considered court records, submissions from Vick and others, reports from outside professionals and conversations with current and former players, among other items.

At a hearing July 22, Goodell spoke to Vick along with his representatives and others including NFL Players’ Association officials.

“As I emphasized to you when we met … it is actions that count,” Goodell wrote to Vick. “I accept that you are sincere when you say that you want to, and will, turn your life around and that you intend to be a positive role model for others. I am prepared to offer you that opportunity. Whether you succeed is entirely in your hands.”

Vick has also filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. At a hearing in that case, he told the judge that he earned 12 cents an hour as an overnight janitor while in prison.

“We take this as a very serious matter,” Goodell said. “We’re dealing with a young man’s life.”

He said Vick admitted lying to him about his involvement in dogfighting and apologized. Goodell said he accepts Vick’s apology.

He acknowledged that he does not like being lied to but said he intends to move forward.

The Humane Society of the United States has said Vick has offered to work with the organization on anti-dogfighting campaigns.

Wayne Pacelle, the organization’s president, has said Vick was to work on programs aimed at preventing youths from getting involved in dogfighting and on programs to assist young people who have been involved.

In testimony before the bankruptcy judge, Vick acknowledged committing a “heinous” act and said he should have acted more maturely.

“Your margin of error is extremely limited,” Goodell wrote to Vick. “I urge you to take full advantage of the resources available to support you and to dedicate yourself to rebuilding your life and your career. If you do this, the NFL will support you.”

Source: CNN

Let the past, be the past, and look into your furture. –BEM Foundation

Welcome back Michael Vick!!!!

Source:  BEM’s Foundation Blog

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Comments:

Announce a Partnership – Yesterday would have been the perfect day to announce a new partnershipbetween the NFL and a group such as the ASPCA  or the Humane Society (Vick did)

NFL Animal Cruelty Initiative – It has been over two years since the Vick incident occurred, and it was clear that decision day for the Commissioner would come.  The months leading up to yesterday should have seen a major campaign against animal cruelty from the League.

Related Resources:


July 28, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, Stop Animal Cruelty, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Some Dog Foods Deliver Toxic Doses of Poison

fluoride, dog food, dogs, cats, petsWith the memory of the melamine pet food scare still fresh in the minds of many, the Environmental Working Group is publicizing a new threat: potentially toxic doses of fluoride in dog food.

An EWG analysis found troubling levels of fluoride in 8 of 10 dog foods tested. The concentration of fluoride was up to 2.5 times higher than the safe level the EPA sets for drinking water. Some puppies may be exposed to five times this limit.

The fluoride in dog food originates in bone meal and animal by-products. EWG recommends choosing dog food brands free of bone meal and meat by-product ingredients like chicken by-product meal, poultry by-product meal, chicken meal and beef meal.

Sources:

The Daily Green June 30, 2009

Environmental Working Group June 26, 2009 [Full Report]

Related Resource: Dr. Mercola

Most pet owners consider their four-legged companions beloved members of their family. With everything else to keep track of, the diet of your pet can easily get tossed on the backburner. Unfortunately, your pet’s health is as dependent on the food you serve as the rest of your family.

Fluoride, it seems, may be a particular problem, as many pet foods contain some form of bone meal, which is believed to be the main source of fluoride in commercial pet foods.

The Power of Advertising is Just as Potent in the Pet Food Industry

As you probably know by now, the food industry spends millions of dollars each year influencing your dietary habits, and the pet food industry is no different. But despite advertising claims and pictures of happy puppies, the majority of commercial pet foods are far from optimally healthy.

Much of the so-called “healthy pet foods” on the market contain inferior meat meals, cheap grains like corn and soy, fillers, by-products, food coloring, pesticides, preservatives, and other contaminants, including fluoride.

Pet food has simply not gained the same amount of scrutiny as human foods, and only when widespread disaster struck did the quality of pet food ingredients become the talk of the town. You may remember the melamine mass-contamination that rocked the pet food industry last year. Since it led to thousands of sick and dead pets around the country it was impossible to ignore.

Fluoride, on the other hand, is more insidious, and likely will not cause sudden death. But it is a potent toxin that can have devastating long-term health effects, both in humans and in pets.

Dangerous Levels of Fluoride Detected in 80 Percent of Commercial Pet Food

When the Environmental Working Group (EWG) conducted a survey of ten national brands of dog food, they discovered that all but two contained “potentially dangerous” levels of fluoride.

Unfortunately, no one really knows what the safe levels of fluoride for animals might be and there are no standards for pet foods, but eight of the brands contained fluoride in amounts between 1.6 and 2.5 times higher than the Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum legal dose in drinking water.

We also know that 2 grams of fluoride is enough to kill an adult, and just 500 mg is enough to kill a child. To those of you not familiar with the metric system, a teaspoon is 5 grams. So less than one half teaspoon of fluoride will kill most adults and one tenth of a teaspoon will kill most children.

In the U.S., people have died, and many have become sick, when faltering fluoridation equipment has pumped excess fluoride into the water. And, since fluoride is used as anactive ingredient in a number of pesticides, we also know it’s definitely deadly to a number of smaller critters, in small amounts.

At an average of 8.9 mg of fluoride per kilogram of dog food, the sampled brands also contained far higher amounts of fluoride than what is associated with osteosarcoma, a form of bone cancer that typically occurs in young boys.

Posted: Just One More Pet

July 25, 2009 Posted by | animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pet Nutrition, pet products, Pets, responsible pet ownership | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Teen Who Killed Kitten Only to Serve One Year in Prison

HLE

The ASPCA applauds the conviction of Cheyenne Cherry, a 17-year-old Bronx, NY, resident who admitted to the heinous act of leaving her ex-roommate’s kitten, Tiger Lily, in an oven to burn to death. On June 3, she was arrested by ASPCA Humane Law Enforcement (HLE) Agents for aggravated animal cruelty, burglary, criminal mischief and arson.

On July 16, in Bronx Supreme Court, Cherry unapologetically pled guilty to charges of animal cruelty and burglary. Waiving her right to appeal, she agreed to serve one year in prison and not keep a pet for the next three years. Currently jailed on a probation violation, her formal sentencing is scheduled for July 31. Cherry’s accomplice, a 14-year-old girl who allegedly placed the kitten in the oven, is facing charges in family court because of her age.

The horrific death of eight-week-old Tiger Lily garnered the public’s attention this past June, and justifiably so, as a clear connection has been established between acts of cruelty toward animals and potential future violence directed at humans. “Cherry appeared to show no remorse for her role in allowing an eight-week-old kitten to cook to death in a 500-degree oven,” says Stacy Wolf, Vice President and Chief Legal Counsel for the ASPCA HLE department. The teen also has a history of violent crimes against both people and animals—in 2008, she was arrested for committing the armed theft of a Yorkshire Terrier.

“The lack of remorse shown by Cheyenne Cherry, along with the complicity of a younger child in the crime, is alarming,” says Sheryl Pipe, ASPCA Senior Director of Humane Education. “It is crucial that legal, mental health and education professionals identify kids at risk of committing such acts and learn how to appropriately intervene.”

What do you think? Tweet on this article. Include @aspca and #TeenConvict

Source:  ASPCA.com

Absolutely not enough considering the level of cruelty.  Cheyenne should have gotten 10 years in prison and should never be allowed to own a pet for the rest of her life!  Cheyenne was unapologetic and there is no rehabilitation in prison that will change her sociopathic tendencies or cruelty and the same goes for the 14-year-old accomplice.  This sentence is a crime!!  JOMP~

Posted: Just One More Pet

Related Articles:

July 25, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Vick Released from Federal Custody—ASPCA President Speaks Out

Woof “The question isn’t whether he deserves to earn a livelihood. The question is whether Mr. Vick should be able to re-join the ranks of elite athletes in the NFL.”—Ed Sayres, ASPCA President & CEO

On Monday, July 20, former Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick, once the highest-paid player in the National Football League (NFL), was released from federal custody after serving a 23-month sentence for dog fighting. The investigation into the horrific activities that took place at Vick’s Virginia dog fighting operation, Bad Newz Kennels, and his 2007 federal conviction not only led to a sullied public image, but to the star quarterback being let go by his team and indefinitely suspended from the NFL.

In light of the ASPCA’s integral role in the investigation—we collected forensic evidence for the court case and led a team of behaviorists in the evaluation of the dozens of dogs rescued from Vick’s property—Ed Sayres, ASPCA President & CEO, offers his unique perspective on the release of Michael Vick and the question on everyone’s mind: what will he do now?

——-

ASPCA Responds to Release of Suspended NFL Star & Convicted Dogfighter Michael Vick from Federal Custody

NEW YORK— The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) issued a statement from ASPCA President and CEO Ed Sayres prompted by suspended NFL star and convicted dogfighter Michael Vick’s release today from federal custody:

“I have spent over 35 years in animal welfare, and currently serve as President of an organization whose very mission it is to prevent animal cruelty. So I do not exaggerate when I say that my thoughts surrounding the future of Michael Vick test the very limits of my objectivity. I have dedicated my life to bringing an end to the very activities that Mr. Vick himself admitted to perpetrating—yet it is with the utmost level of objectivity that those of us in the animal welfare world must employ when discussing ‘What next?’ with Mr. Vick’s career in the NFL.

“Being as objective as possible, the facts are clear: Mr. Vick participated in a six-year pattern of illegal activity. His plea clearly stated that along with these activities, he savagely electrocuted and beat dogs to death after they lost their brutal fights. It is this barbarism that sets the crime apart. This was not a one-time transgression or crime of passion—this was a multi-year pattern of behavior that demonstrates a startling lack of moral character and judgment.

“Regardless, Mr. Vick most decidedly deserves to be employed. However, the question isn’t whether he deserves to earn a livelihood…. The question is whether Mr. Vick should be able to re-join the ranks of the elite athletes in the NFL. The NFL is not your average workplace—with stratospheric salaries, licensing agreements, corporate endorsements and tens of millions of adoring fans, the NFL represents, to many, the achievement of ‘The American Dream.’ These athletes are looked upon as our heroes… our role models… and with Mr. Vick in the enviable role of quarterback, they are viewed as leaders.

“Given the stature of what it means to be a part of the NFL, it is crucial that Mr. Vick first express remorse for what he has done—something that he has yet to do throughout his incarceration. It is also critical that Mr. Vick take advantage of the opportunity granted to him by Wayne Pacelle and the Humane Society of the United States. Through his association with HSUS, Mr. Vick has a tremendous opportunity to address those many years of horrific judgment and finally demonstrate responsible community behavior.

“It is this conscientious presence in their communities that truly made heroes of men like Walter Payton and Jack Kemp. These men had a sense of integrity, compassion and dedication that was apparent throughout their illustrious careers. It is these legacies that Mr. Vick should aspire to emulate.

“Most people will be seeking a cut-and-dried answer to the question of whether Mr. Vick should be allowed to return to the NFL. It is simply not my place to make such an assertion—instead, this is the challenge that awaits NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. But Mr. Goodell has amply demonstrated his capacity for leadership in the past, and as a representative of a community that truly has been tested by Mr. Vick’s ruthless actions, I ask that we give Mr. Goodell the time and space to deliberate on what will undoubtedly amount to a precedent-setting decision.”

Note: The ASPCA worked closely with federal authorities at every step of the case, first assisting in the investigation itself through the involvement of Dr. Melinda Merck, senior director of Veterinary Forensics with the ASPCA, and later when Dr. Stephen Zawistowski, CAAB, executive vice president of ASPCA Programs, led a team of several Certified Applied Animal Behaviorists in the behavior evaluations of the seized dogs.

Source:  ASPCA.org

Posted:  Just One More Pet

Related:  Resources:

July 25, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, animals, Just One More Pet, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , | 5 Comments

Yo Quiero Taco Bell

GidgetGidget, the Chihuahua best known for her Taco Bell ad campaign, died from a stroke the other night at age 15, People.com reported. “She made so many people happy,” said Gidget’s trainer Sue Chipperton .

The mostly retired actor lived out her days laying in the sun. “I like to joke that it’s like looking after a plant,” said Chipperton. “Gidget always knew where the camera was.”

Gidget also starred in Legally Blonde II: Red, White and Blue in the role of Bruiser’s mom and started a clamoring for purse size Chihuahua’s.

After being released from mascot duties by Taco Bell, Gidget was a guest on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, where she was allowed a choice of a Taco Bell Chalupa or some KFC chicken.  She chose the chicken.

According to Gidget’s trainer, Sue Chipperton, the dog spent her retirement days laying in the sun, which is what she did on her last day.  Gidget was with Chipperton watching television when she began making strange noises and suffered a stroke.  The dog “had a good day and was running around as normal,” said her owner, Karen McElhatton.  “We’re happy that she was very well off right until the end.”

Watch ¡Yo quiero Taco Bell! commercial below.

The advertising catch-phrase for the Taco Bell commercial was “¡Yo quiero Taco Bell!” (”I want Taco Bell!”). The voiceover work for these commercials was provided by voice actor Carlos Alazraqui.

Posted:  Just One More Pet

July 23, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, Just One More Pet, Pet Events | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Take Pup Out to the Ball Game

Dog Day Games Go to Ballparks Across the Country

Take Pup Out to the Ball GameAmerica’s two favorite pastimes are together at last. Baseball and dogs at the ballpark, throw in a hot dog and it might be heaven. Hooray for Dog Day Games! All across the country, dogs and their people can “root root root for the home team” live at the game. And since it’s doggie’s big day, your best friend can expect great things. Not only will he join you in the VIP (very important pup) dog seating section, but each ball club welcomes its furry fans with different doggie activities. From a pre-game parade on the field, to costume contests, pooch massages, special treats and games, even free health checkups; it’s a hot diggity dog day.

And now that the official baseball season has begun, don’t waste a second. Score two tickets for you and your dog to the Dog Day game in your city. Pup seats are limited and sell out quickly so don’t miss out. Check your team’s ticket office for dates, times and all the juicy details. Do make sure you get the Dog Day seats and not just general admission tickets to the game.

But first consider this: as much as you love baseball and your dog, not all dogs make good fans. If your pup is bothered by crowds, noise and commotion, or isn’t likely to mind his manners, the Dog Day Games are not for him. Only well-behaved pups with proof of vaccination and license may attend.

Check to see if your team has a Dog Day Game and get it on your calendar. Just go to mlb.com to get to your team’s website and click on their 2009 Promotional Schedule.

Tonight was Take Your Dog To the Ball Game Nite in Oakland vs. the Angels.

The San Francisco Giants’ Dog Day is on August 1st vs. the Phillies and the Cincinnati Reds will have their second Dog Day of the season on September 15th vs. Houston.  Other teams that had a Dog Day Games this (2009) season are the Atlanta Braves, the Florida Marlins, and the Chicago White Socks.  Each ballpark schedules different events and many sell doggie wear and items with the team logo.  Some teams who do not have a doggie day scheduled still sell pet wear:  www.sportydog.com/mlb.  Write or email your favorite team and request a ‘Take Your Dog to the Ballpark Day’ if they don’t have one scheduled for 2010.

Source: WoofReport.com

Posted: Just One More Pet

Thank you to Claudia and SF Giants fan Tanny for the photo.

July 18, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Daily Chart: Pet Theories About Health-Care Spending

Daily Chart: Pet Theories About Health-Care Spending

This chart by Cato’s AEI’s Andrew Biggs has been snaking its way around the blogosphere for the past week:

Pet spending

And it’s gotten approving [update: and skeptical!] chirps from Megan McArdle, Tyler Cowen,Jim Manzi, Arnold Kling and Greg Mankiw and others, a good deal of whom parrot the old line about how this shows that “The reason that we spend more [on healthcare] than our grandparents did is not waste, fraud and abuse, but advances in medical technology and growth in incomes.” If it were waste, fraud and abuse, wouldn’t you see the difference in the animal market?

But let’s not flap about this too much. The chart is hounded by some fatal problems. John Schwenkler gently badgered me into trying to make a new version of this chart that deals with some of them, and I’ve been monkeying around with the data for the past couple of days. But, for reasons I’ll grouse about after the jump, I can’t reproduce a better version of this chart. (Scott Winship and Zubin Jelveh have ferreted out some of the missing data.) What I can do is graph the growth of pet food spending over the same period, and then list some of the reasons why the original chart doesn’t prove much at all. (And cut out the dumb animal puns.)

Pet food

1. This data is drawn from the same source (the Consumer Expenditure Survey) as the original chart. The raw slope of the pet food spending line is actually higher than the raw slope of the veterinary spending line. The normalized slope of the veterinary care line is a bit higher, but both are higher than average economic growth over the same period. Does this mean there is something unique about the two health markets, or something unique about the two animal markets? Or neither? I have no idea.

2. As Schwenkler and Manzi and others have pointed out, the original chart does not have per capita data. But of course we only care about how much is being spent on health care per person or dog. If the population grows quickly, the overall level of spending will grow with it. (Incidentally, this is why I’m having trouble reproducing Biggs’ chart exactly: I can’t find the number of total pets per person in the country between 1984 and 2006. And, to be extra cautious about it, I’d also need to know something about how the population has changed — more ponies or parakeets or whatnot.)

3. Even if the chart made the same point on a per capita basis, I’m not sure why it would be surprising. You don’t really have insurance or adverse selection in the veterinary market. But you do have large information asymmetries (the vets know more), large demand uncertainties (the need for veterinary care springs up uncertainly), large supply constraints, and a whole series of new patent-protected treatments that can lead to market failures.

4. Even if none of the problems in # 3 turn out to exist, I’m not sure why the growth of veterinary spending is a point in favor of conservative theories about the growth of health-care spending. Two of the most commonly cited conservative reasons for the rise in health-care spending are (1) The tax exclusion for employer-sponsored health insurance; and (2) malpractice liability, which is supposed to lead to defensive medicine and higher costs. But neither of those things happen in the veterinary market! If the original chart is correct, then are these things not really problems?

My overwhelming suspicion is that the chart does not tell us much that is useful about the market for medical care. I spoke with Andrew Biggs yesterday, and he very kindly shared his data from the expediture survey (which is not publicly available). He also cautioned against taking any of this too seriously. 700 words and two charts later, I agree.

Permalink :: Trackback (0) :: Sphere It! ::

Share This

TRACKBACK URL FOR THIS ENTRY:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451c45669e20115720dae74970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference ‘Daily Chart: Pet Theories About Health-Care Spending

Source:  the Atlantic – The Daily Dish

Posted:  Just One More Pet

July 17, 2009 Posted by | Animal or Pet Related Stories, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Health, Pets, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Seems Michael Vick Snuck Out of Prison When Released to Avoid Media

Michael Vick snuck out of prison the morning of May 20th to avoid the onslaught of media that was awaiting for him. However YMSWWC’s super photographer did manage to snap this shot.

Obviously a photoshopped pic, but Mr. Vick should have to walk around in a faux coat like this as part of his probation in my opinion!!  M~

Originally Posted by Thomas the Terrible on May 20, 2009

FreeVick

July 16, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal or Pet Related Stories, Animal Rescues, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pets, Political Change, Stop Animal Cruelty, Unusual Stories, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Don’t think for a minute that dogs can survive in a hot car

Veterinarian Shawn Messonnier, with Rita, says that  "a matter of minutes, five or 10 minutes," is all it takes on a hot day for a dog to wind up organ-damaged or dead.

(Photo) Veterinarian Shawn Messonnier, with Rita, says that “a matter of minutes, five or 10 minutes,” is all it takes on a hot day for a dog to wind up organ-damaged or dead.

It’s 11 a.m., 75 degrees…

In the Safeway parking lot, two hairy dogs are panting and pacing in a car with windows cracked about 5 inches. They’re hot and unhappy, but not yet in distress, I think. I wait a couple of minutes, then call the humane society. I share the facts, including that one dog has just crammed itself under the steering wheel, evidently to get out of the blazing sunlight.

They believe the dogs will be OK until help can arrive — five minutes.

Animal-control guy rolls up in four, eyeballs the situation and decides to give the owner a few more minutes to emerge.

Owner blusters up just under the deadline, annoyed that people surround his car. Doors are flung open, water offered. Owner receives a stern lecture.

I hope it made an impact. Too many locked-in-cars dogs die horrible deaths every summer, their brains, their organs literally heated into mush.

I have to assume that most owners who take dogs in vehicles love those animals. And that until the awful moment of returning to a stifling car and discovering the tragic aftermath of a bad choice, they just didn’t fully understand (despite warnings from vets and humane organizations) how fast things go really bad.

So maybe this will help: a graphic description of exactly what occurs when a dog (and it’s almost always dogs, since few people take cats for rides) is closed in a hot car.

Plano, Texas, veterinarian Shawn Messonnier, who knows something about hideous heat and animals and who has written several books, including Unexpected Miracles: Hope and Holistic Healing for Pets, out next month, agreed to be brutally descriptive about the process and physiology of heat stroke.

First, he says, it’s important to understand that the temperature doesn’t have to be in the 90s for a car-bound animal to be in deep trouble. At much lower temperatures, particularly if the sky is cloudless, the humidity high or the car dark-colored, a vehicle becomes a sauna fast. And cracking windows a few inches accomplishes practically nothing (though many owners of now-dead pets thought it would).

In fact, researchers learned that when it’s a sunny 78 degrees, the temperature in a parked car with windows cracked rises at least 32 degrees in 30 minutes. So: 78 degrees to 110 in half an hour.

“A matter of minutes, five or 10 minutes” is all it takes on a hot day for a dog to wind up organ-damaged or dead, Messonnier says.

Here’s how it progresses: First, the dog pants hard, trying the only way it can to cool off. As the temperature rises and the dog realizes it’s in trouble, it becomes frantic, tries to get out, scratching at windows or digging at the seat or floor. It’s an awful moment, the dog’s moment of realization. “If you want to compare it to humans,” says Messonnier, “it would be this: The person is too hot, stifling, feeling trapped. But a person knows things can be done,” like smashing a window or blowing the horn for help. Dogs, of course, panic, since they can devise no strategies other than digging desperately. They often bloody themselves in this effort to survive. Some have heart attacks.

The panic doesn’t last long. Very quickly the dog goes prostrate, begins vomiting, having diarrhea and lapsing into unconsciousness. Organs are disintegrating. “All organs function properly within a certain temperature range, and when body temperature reaches a certain level, organ cells begin dying. There’s inflammation, white blood cells rush in … a cascade of things happens in minutes,” he says. Liver, brain, kidneys are dying.

“When you do an autopsy on a dog that died this way, the organs are soupy.”

If caught quickly enough, some dogs can be saved. It’s crucial to open car windows, turn on air conditioning and race to the nearest vet, dousing the dog in cool water if possible during the trip, putting something cool under each armpit and against the groin (“but don’t waste 20 minutes trying to gather up those last things,” Messonnier says, as it’s most important to get experts involved fast).

“If you’ve caught it early enough and you’re real lucky, there will be no permanent damage,” he says, though ascertaining that is a “waiting game” since some dogs that seem to have pulled through have liver or kidney damage that may not be obvious at first.

It’ll likely cost “several hundred dollars to several thousand dollars” to save a dog with heatstroke.

Not to mention the misery the animal has endured.

The reality is those “dashes” into the market while the dog waits in the car are rarely as quick as we expect. I know of an owner who ran into the bank, tripped while walking to the counter, knocked himself out, and by the time he regained sense (not long) and got someone to check on the dog in his car, it was too late. That’s the kind of thing that could happen, really, during any dash-in visit.

There’s also the person who left the car running with the air conditioner on to keep the dog cool. Car quit running. You can imagine the results.

And, by the way, snub-nosed dogs such as boxers and pugs have an even higher risk of overheating because they don’t cool efficiently.

I hate to be so grim.

But really, if it saves a dog …

Good Reminder!!  Thanks to Sharon L. Peters – Pet Talk, USA TODAY

Posted:  Just One More Pet

July 16, 2009 Posted by | animal abuse, Animal Rights And Awareness, animals, Just One More Pet, Pet Abuse, Pet Friendship and Love, Pets, Political Change, responsible pet ownership, We Are All God's Creatures | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 231 other followers